Go Back   Team-BHP > Buckle Up > Travelogues


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 20th April 2012, 22:58   #1
BHPian
 
wanderer4x4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Guwahati
Posts: 308
Thanked: 388 Times
Default On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis

Now, hold on!! And before you jump up onto your desk and fearfully look around, at the mention of the man eater, let me remind you that she has been dead for the last 83 years. And in these intervening years, we humans have managed to exterminate most of her relatives as well, so much so that not a single one probably is around those areas. So, relax, sit back and accompany me on the trail of the tigress. And let me warn you, this is going to be a rambling running commentary.
Like many other young people, I too was a Jim Corbett buff in school days (I still am and re-read his books time and again) and always wanted to retrace his footsteps around the places that he had mentioned. Places little known even to this day like Kanda, Panar, Thak etc always had held unfathomable, curious attraction for me just from reading the books. So when, after the grind of the financial year end in March, a little breathing window appeared at work, I promptly decided that this time itíd be Mukteshwar with a brief stop at Kaladhungi. And so, with anticipation rising high, we flew down to Delhi for the journey into the mountains.

On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00001.jpg

The plan was to spend few days in Delhi first to finish off with some personal work and then proceed to Mukteshwar. For this travel, I had two choices- either drive down from Delhi or take the Ranikhet Express to Kathgodam and then hire a taxi. After thinking about it, I decided to book the train considering that it saves time because both onward and return journeys are overnight ones, giving two full free days, whereas if you drive throughout the night you are bound to be exhausted for the next day. Also, with a one year old infant, a drive would have been too strenuous. Asked around some people, who informed that taxis are easily available at Kathgodam and Haldwani for travel to any place in Kumaon.
Well, letís not bore you anymore with all the planning and thinking stories, lest you lose appetite for the actual mountains. So, letís board the train and tomorrow.....Kathgodam.

The train reached Kathgodam on schedule and the early morning chill mountain air greeted us. Mukteshwar is around 72 kms from here and sedate driving takes around 2 hours to reach it. As soon as we got down from the train, the taxi guys came around offering us to drop at Nainital or any other place. We spoke to a guy and fixed an Alto for the drop to Mukteshwar KMVN tourist rest house. The drive was through the Bhimtal, Bhowali route and was uneventful. On the way, we could see the HMT plant and the staff quarters which are in derelict condition now with only few workers remaining. Finally at around 8 am we reached the KMVN.
Though there are many resorts, the best spots are occupied by the KMVN and the PWD IB in Mukteshwar which are side by side. The rest house is in close proximity to the IVRI trails, the famous Chauli ki Jali and the temple. All the private resorts are quite far in places like Bhateliya and Sagarkhet which without own car are not easy to reach from the above spots. Booking of the KMVN was hassle free and was done at their Delhi office. The rest house was okay with carpeted floors, hot running water and TV set. Breakfast and dinner was complementary. As we reached early and the previous occupants had not yet vacated the room, we waited around the terraced sitting area. The staffs were courteous and helpful and offered us the use of a vacant room to freshen up. Paratha and excellent curd was served for breakfast. We planned on relaxing a bit before walking around in the afternoon.

On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00589.jpg
The PWD IB with the KMVN Rest House in the background

On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00586at.jpg
The courtyard in front of the IB offers great views

The courtyard in front of the PWB IB is itself a tourist spot offering the finest views of the snow capped Himalayas. All the major peaks including the Trishul, Nandadevi, Nandakot and the Pancha Chuli group are cleanly visible on nice, clear days. But, April is not a season for peak viewing as haze from dust and the forest fires obscure the view. But, still I was hoping against hope for a glimpse of the mountains and was disappointed that no peaks were visible. But, few other tourists who were about to leave the rest house, told us that they had partial views of the peaks in the early morning on that very day. This kept up my hope of viewing the famous peaks. Sometimes rains also make the dust settle and reduce the atmospheric disturbance to make the peaks visible even in this season.

On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00256a.jpg
On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00264b.jpg
On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00265d.jpg

After sometime, the room got ready and we went up to the 4 bed super deluxe room that we had booked. The room itself provided quite nice views from the windows. Went out to the balcony and heard the whistling sound of the pine forest in the wind which gradually developed into a full scale howling dry storm. Having nothing better to do, crept under the covers to relax and hoping that the winds also bring in the rains otherwise whatever chance we had of the Himalayan views will be destroyed by the fresh dust and haze thrown up by the winds. Which way would it beÖgod only knows.

On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00262c.jpg
Views from the room. In favourable conditions the peaks are visible in the distance. Not today though.

Woke up in the afternoon to find that the wind is howling away unabated but there are no rain clouds in the sky. Looked towards the Himalayas to find even greater haze so much so that even the nearer hills were obscure under the grey haze. Disappointed, went down to have lunch with chicken curry prepared in the rest house kitchen.

After lunch as I stood thinking what to do in this weather, suddenly the winds stopped abruptly as if someone had turned off a switch. Immediately a welcome silence filled the area with the sounds of crickets and some birds filling the void. I decided that it would be a good time to trek up the trail that goes behind the rest house towards Chauli ki jali and then upwards to the temple. The trail is nothing more than a narrow walkway through the pine and rhododendron forests and in places hewn though underfoot rocks. As I was walking on it, my minds eye visualized the tigers and felt their steely unblinking stare. In the solitude and silence of the place, (we were the only people at that time on the trail) a creepy feeling is there everytime there is a sudden rustle and noise from the langurs.

The trail leading from the KMVN Rest House
On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00272f.jpg
On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00273g.jpg
On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00470.jpg
The langurs look on curiously

After walking around 500 meters upwards, we came onto the famous Chauli ki Jali view point. Here, the rock face of the hill is jutting onto the sky at bizarre angles with sheer drop of many hundred feet to the valley floor below. As per some, the rock face has been sculpted and eroded like that by the winds for thousands of years to the present shape. And true to this, the howling winds started once again as soon as we reached the place. Here, there are some facilities for rappelling on the rocks.

On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00474k.jpg
On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00506am.jpg
On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00529m.jpg
On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00312o.jpg

Last edited by wanderer4x4 : 20th April 2012 at 23:24.
wanderer4x4 is offline   (2) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 21st April 2012, 09:49   #2
Senior - BHPian
 
Maverick5490's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Thane
Posts: 1,254
Thanked: 610 Times
Default Re: On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis

Captivating title, crisp writing and beautiful photographs! The place looks very charming and peaceful, hoping you got to see the magnificent Himalaya's.
Maverick5490 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 21st April 2012, 10:51   #3
Distinguished - BHPian
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: MUMBAI
Posts: 3,059
Thanked: 4,658 Times
Default Re: On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis

Dear Wanderer 4*4 - your first picture vividly reminds me of the "Jim Corbett Special Stage" of the Himalayan Rally 1983. It was very early morning of 29 October 1983, the road was exactly like this, we were driving absolutely flat out, literally flying. The Special Stage ended in Nainital, with Parc Ferme next to the lake on the basketball courts. Starting at number 73, I was number 12 at Nainital. The view of the mountains was awesome.

Best regards,

Behram Dhabhar
DHABHAR.BEHRAM is offline   (1) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 22nd April 2012, 17:15   #4
BHPian
 
wanderer4x4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Guwahati
Posts: 308
Thanked: 388 Times
Default Re: On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis

Quote:
Originally Posted by Maverick5490 View Post
Captivating title, crisp writing and beautiful photographs! The place looks very charming and peaceful, hoping you got to see the magnificent Himalaya's.
Thanks Maverick. The place indeed is very peaceful and is great for leisurely walks and treks. Regarding the Himalayas...well, read on.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DHABHAR.BEHRAM View Post
The Special Stage ended in Nainital, with Parc Ferme next to the lake on the basketball courts. Starting at number 73, I was number 12 at Nainital. The view of the mountains was awesome.
Hi Mr. Dhabhar. The area next to the courts look something like this now a days, with the whole place being turned into a huge parking place. Though I can imagine the views way back in 1983.
On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00806.jpg

Now coming back to the travelogue.

Slightly to the lower left of Chauli ki Jali and on the extreme end of the hill, there is an old abandoned cottage with many stone chimneys. The look itself of the house was creepy and I was wondering how itíd have felt like to spend a night those years ago in that desolate, windy place with not a single house or settlement nearby. With man eaters and leopards roaming around, it must have been a frightful experience for anyone who needed to venture out at night. No wonder it was abandoned.

On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00540an.jpg
The lone house on the edge of the cliff

After spending some more time around there, we started the walk upwards through the predominantly pine forest towards the Mukteshwar temple which is situated on the highest spot on that hill. The trail from Chauli ki Jali takes one towards the back of the temple. The small stone temple is dedicated to Lord Shiva with a Hanuman temple and Devi temple within the premises. Lots of small bells adorn the wooden gate and the pine branches around and these made nice tinkling sounds in the wind. With not a single soul in sight in that twilight hour except the lone mantra chanting purohit, my mind again went back to 83 years ago and wondered how the then purohit must have braved the man eater to perform his duties in those days.

On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00319p.jpg
The trail leading towards the Mukteshwar temple which is towards the rear of the temple. There are steps from the front side main road as well.

On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00324q.jpg
Lots of these tiny bells adorns the temples surroundings

On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00332s.jpg
The main temple

On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00328r.jpg
Another view of the Chauli ki jali from the temple which is situated higher than the cliffs.

On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00334t.jpg
The steps leading to the main road

On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00336u.jpg
The main gate of the temple

There are stone steps leading down from the temple to the motorable main road and we came down these to reach the KMVN and the PWD IB thus making a circle around the hill. As it was sunset time, I decided to try some sun set shots at the famous IB view point. Sun sets/sun rise in the mountains are quite different from the ones in plains. In plains, sunrise/sunset is uniform and gradual across the landscape whereas in the mountains one part may be in dusk and a distant part will still have sunlight shining on it due to the unevenness of the terrain. Clouds and trees also play a part in this. This gives rise to fantastic hues and colours at different points in the landscape and thus offering different shades and colours in the same frame for the camera. Also, the same object gets portrayed in different colours in different lighting conditions.

On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00350u.jpg

On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00371y.jpg
The setting sun painted the spring time forest in different colours.

On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00354w.jpg

On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00355x.jpg
Tried my hand at a panorama shot

On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00365z.jpg
This tree became a reference point for many of my photographs. I kind of like it in the frame.

On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00367ab.jpg

On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00368ac.jpg
Only thing left was a view of the peaks. Would have made the photographs magical.

After braving the fierce winds for sometime and seeing some distant lightning and thunder, I finally called it quits and retracted to the rooms to relax and hoping that the night brings heavy rains to make the Himalayas appear from the gloom.
wanderer4x4 is offline   (2) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 23rd April 2012, 11:23   #5
Senior - BHPian
 
motomaverick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Bangalore
Posts: 1,838
Thanked: 864 Times
Default Re: On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis

Great pictures, especially the first one looks really good. About the guest house, can we book that online or something or you have to go their office to book a room?
motomaverick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23rd April 2012, 14:26   #6
BHPian
 
Thamizha's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Chennai
Posts: 69
Thanked: 12 Times
Default Re: On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis

Awesome pics. The sunset looks fabulous.
Thamizha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23rd April 2012, 23:04   #7
BHPian
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Alappuzha
Posts: 249
Thanked: 66 Times
Default Re: On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis

Dear Wanderer, your pics took me to the place where my boyhood( and now also)hero Jim Corbett braved the man eaters in the good old days. Thank you very much. I will take a trip to these places before the time when these quiet and beautiful places are totally destroyed by the so called"development"
Ashley Nair is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24th April 2012, 11:50   #8
BHPian
 
wanderer4x4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Guwahati
Posts: 308
Thanked: 388 Times
Default Re: On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis

Quote:
Originally Posted by motomaverick View Post
Great pictures, especially the first one looks really good. About the guest house, can we book that online or something or you have to go their office to book a room?
The guest house can be booked online through www.kmvn.org. KMVN also has offices in Delhi, B'lore, Mumbai, Kolkata, Ahmedabad etc. I had booked through their Delhi office at Barakhamba Road.

Do not expect any 5 star luxury though. But, having said that, it is okay considering the remoteness. Any shortcomings are more than made up for by the location of the property.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thamizha View Post
Awesome pics. The sunset looks fabulous.
Thanks, mate!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ashley Nair View Post
Dear Wanderer, your pics took me to the place where my boyhood( and now also)hero Jim Corbett braved the man eaters in the good old days. Thank you very much. I will take a trip to these places before the time when these quiet and beautiful places are totally destroyed by the so called"development"
Well, do take a trip soon. As you rightly said, time is not far when "development" is going to kill these places and make it like any other crowded hill station. Throughout the drive upto Mukteshwar, you'd find cottages, resorts that have come up haphazardly all over the hillsides with some multistoried apartments as well (and new construction going on continuously). The actual Mukteshwar proper around the IVRI is still frozen in time though as most of the land is owned by the IVRI.

Will continue with the travelogue in the evening.
wanderer4x4 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24th April 2012, 12:06   #9
BHPian
 
lordofgondor's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: UP 16
Posts: 936
Thanked: 155 Times
Default Re: On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis

Me's feeling so nostalgic reading this log! Thanks for sharing. The first pic is making me yearn so much to make a run to the mountains. Catching a good view of the upper Himalaya range, with those snowy peaks is indeed a matter of luck. During several visits to Kumaon, I got to see them only once @ Binsar.

Awaiting for the rest of the log to unfold.

Quote:
Originally Posted by motomaverick View Post
... About the guest house, can we book that online or something or you have to go their office to book a room?
You can book KMVN guest houses online too at kmvn dot org.
lordofgondor is offline   (1) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 24th April 2012, 14:26   #10
Senior - BHPian
 
nilanjanray's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Bangalore
Posts: 1,826
Thanked: 2,386 Times
Default Re: On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis

Great narration and pictures! Kumaon is one of my favourite places, and I am a big fan of Corbett. I wish to do a Corbett, Mukteshwar and Eastern Kumaon roadtrip someday.
nilanjanray is offline   (1) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 25th April 2012, 00:02   #11
BHPian
 
wanderer4x4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Guwahati
Posts: 308
Thanked: 388 Times
Default Re: On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis

ÖÖ..command one of the best views to be had anywhere of the Himalayan snowy range. This range, and all the hills that lie between it and the plains of India, run east and west, and from a commanding point on any of the hills an uninterrupted view can be obtained not only of the snows to the north but also of the hills and valleys to the east and to the west as far as the eye can see. People who have lived at Muktesar claim that it is the most beautiful spot in Kumaon, and that its climate has no equal. Ė Jim Corbett, The Muktesar Man-Eater

Jim Corbett had thus paid glowing tribute to the beauty of Mukteshwar all those years ago. Himalayan view or no view, it is indeed a very beautiful, peaceful place. Having read and heard about the beauty of the mountain views, and having failed to view anything the previous day, I woke up quite early on this day and parted the curtains to find that not a drop of rain had fallen and the mountains were still shrouded in haze. All the lighting and thunder had been for nothing then. So went back to sleep again and woke up to a leisurely breakfast of Paratha- Dahi Ė Achaar (the menu is limited) and then went towards the main Mukteshwar centre point where the bank, post office and the IVRI main gate is there along with a handful of small shops.
The place seemed like it has remained frozen in time, since Corbettís days except that in the distant hills on the other side of the valley, cottages and apartments have come up for sale. Otherwise, its very peaceful and quiet with not many people or vehicles around. The IVRI campus is huge and covers major parts of the hillside on the northern side and has many walking trails and pathways. But nowadays tourists are not allowed inside through the main gate (but people still walk on the numerous pathways through the pine forests). On that day, while walking around the place, we seemed to be the only tourists around and the lazy quietness felt superb.

There are many trails and pathways through pine forests like these

Attachment 919999
Attachment 919993

Another view of Chauli ki jali from the opposite side

Attachment 919994

A nice house on the edge of the hill. Owners must enjoy a permanent holiday home.
Attachment 919995

These cute snowballs looked on.
Attachment 919996
Attachment 919997

Many such terraced fields and orchards adorn the hillside
Attachment 919998

The main centre point
Attachment 920000

The bank is also located at a nice place.
Attachment 920001

Came back exhausted from these walks, had lunch and took a nap, planning to visit Chauli ki jali again for sunset view.

Do you remember the old, abandoned house? My mind again went back to it, and I asked one local around the KMVN who told me that it was a cottage from British times and has been abandoned for many many years now. Reaching chauli ki jali, today I decided to climb down to the house on the hill face and just explore. There was no visible track or road to the house and I had to climb through rocks and small ravine to reach it. The house was surrounded by old overgrown wild rose plants and some of the doors and windows were broken and creaking in the wind like in the horror movies.

On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00540an.jpg
On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00543.jpg
On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00556ap.jpg

As I passed the doors of the house, an eerie feeling passed over me. It was not fear but it was definitely creepy with the house being taken over by nature. Then suddenly I saw a metal plate with something written fixed on the stone wall near the roof on the rear side of the building.

On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00545.jpg

PWD Coolies No 2. And suddenly, the purpose and the location of the house became somewhat clear to me. It must have been a quarter for the native labours (coolies) employed by the PWD and as they were mere coolies the British colonial hierarchy must have segregated them from near the British settlement to this desolate place. It definitely gives a glimpse of the British times. (If it was really a house from the Raj era and I might be wrong in my assumptions as well.)

Though I absolutely despise people who deface monuments and walls with the A + B formula surrounded by the outlines of a leaf to profess their love, Chauli ki jali throws up some interesting tit bits to the discerning eyes. Among the profusion of these, here one can find many name carvings dating to 1920ís and 30ís with many European (presumably British) names which have stood the test of weather on these rocks.

On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00525nnm.jpg

I saw one group of western names with the prefix USN dated the 1930ís. If USN were to stand for US Navy, I wonder what they were doing in Mukteshwar in 1930ís.

The image below, speaks a story of its own.

On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00527cvbcv.jpg

Mehta and Timothy. The names are carved together in same handwriting dated 1946. One is Indian, the other British. They must have been friends to carve their names together despite the vast differences between the two races in those times and their friendship has weathered the test of time till date on the rock face. I wonder what had happened to them after independence and whether they had remained friends.


On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00558aq.jpg
The actual Chauli ki Jali (hole) through which many childless women pass through on Shivaratri in the hope of having a child.


Sunlight playing hide and seek in the twilight hour
On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00500vxv.jpg
On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00569ar.jpg

After reminiscing about the bygone times and the abandoned house, I suddenly remembered the man eater and realized that it was almost dark and so trudged back through the jungle to the rest house lest the man eatersí spirit strangles me by its tail.

Thinking of man eaters and tigers, I realized that Royal Bengal Tigers, whom we think to be animals of the plains of Corbett and Kaziranga and swamps of Sunderbans, were also there near the snow line or snowy hills (in winters) abundantly. This is one example of how habitat destruction and interference by man can permanently alter the balance of nature. Anyways, before going more OT, letís get back to the Tílog.

After dinner, I pleasantly realized that the sounds outside that I had started to hear were not the rustling of the pine trees; rather they were the falling rains. With two days spent without no views, this is the last chance I had of having a view of the mountains at sunrise. With high hopes again, went to sleep early promising to myself to wake up before sunrise to try and get some shots of the mighty Himalayas.
Attached Thumbnails
On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00391ae.jpg  

On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00396ag.jpg  


Last edited by wanderer4x4 : 25th April 2012 at 00:09.
wanderer4x4 is offline   (2) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 25th April 2012, 23:29   #12
BHPian
 
wanderer4x4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Guwahati
Posts: 308
Thanked: 388 Times
Default Re: On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis

Woke up in the morning early, held my breath and parted the windows and....this is what greeted me at last!
On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00593df.jpg
I was still in shadows, but the sunlight had hit the peaks and were glowing orange. Almora is still blissfully sleeping under the mountains shadows. The tallest twin peaks towards the right of the frame are the Nandadevi and Nandadevi East.

At long last, the rains had done the trick and the peaks became visible to a large extent. I took off with my camera to capture whatever of the landscape I could. Some images from that beautiful morning.

Close up of Trishul East and the Nandadevi twins.
On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00601sddv.jpg

Nanda Ghunti peak
On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00602.jpg

Nanda Devi once again
On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00604xcvxcv.jpg

Nanda Kot and the Pancha Chuli group
On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00605cvcx.jpg

The entire range sans the Pancha Chuli group
On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00606.jpg

Trishul East eastern face
On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00619.jpg

Tried to capture the entire vista
On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00655hghjk.jpg

The gradually rising sun played hide and seek with the mountains and provided some colourful photographs.
On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00610aw.jpg
On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00649.jpg

It seemed finally that the mountain gods reluctantly removed the shroud to reveal the peaks to allow me take these photographs and then gradually with the rising sun and increased haze, the peaks became hidden once again.

After having a glimpse of the second highest peak in India with her siblings, it was time to make the final leg of the journey to retrace the steps of Jim Corbett to Nainital and Kaladhungi, two places Corbett called home in India.
For this purpose I booked a cab and started towards Nainital. It seemed that the gods took my prayers of the last few days for rain too seriously and soon it was raining cats and dogs. Of course, heavy rains in the mountains, with the pine forests on both sides making whistling noise in the wind, has a unique charm, but it also meant that I could not take out my camera for much of the way. The road which was quite deserted was another beautiful sight to the eyes. The rains and the winds shook the fine mature pine needles free from the branches and the road was carpeted in these reddish brown needles. To the eyes, it seemed as if someone had placed an undulating rust-brown carpet across the forests.

On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00714nbnmn.jpg
On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis-dsc00716mb.jpg

To be contd....
wanderer4x4 is offline   (4) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 29th April 2012, 00:18   #13
BHPian
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Chennai
Posts: 365
Thanked: 135 Times
Default Re: On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis

Beautiful pictures and equally captivating narration. Hope we do not destroy all this with "development". Rated 5 stars too
chennai-indian is offline   (1) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 29th April 2012, 12:57   #14
BHPian
 
joshuakeys's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Hyderabad/Pune
Posts: 177
Thanked: 47 Times
Infractions: 0/1 (5)
Default Re: On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis

Waiting for more. Thanks for sharing.
joshuakeys is offline   (1) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 29th April 2012, 14:24   #15
BHPian
 
wanderer4x4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Guwahati
Posts: 308
Thanked: 388 Times
Default Re: On the trail of the Mukteshwar man eater and her nemesis

Quote:
Originally Posted by chennai-indian View Post
Beautiful pictures and equally captivating narration. Hope we do not destroy all this with "development". Rated 5 stars too
Quote:
Originally Posted by joshuakeys View Post
Waiting for more. Thanks for sharing.
Thanks a lot, chennai-indian and joshuakeys, for your kind words and appreciation.

Right now I am travelling. Will update the travelogue once I am back. Thank you everyone once again for going through this.

Last edited by wanderer4x4 : 29th April 2012 at 14:25.
wanderer4x4 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Delhi to Mukteshwar souravdebiswas Route / Travel Queries 45 6th October 2015 13:45
Searching for Nirvana @ Naukuciatal & Majestic Mukteshwar! lordofgondor Travelogues 18 27th January 2011 13:08
The Range Rover - Bowler Nemesis blueraven316 Int'l Motorsport 2 17th October 2007 20:43
BEHOLD The Nemesis accord masters Modifications & Accessories 107 16th October 2007 08:54
need help moding the nemesis (accord v6) accord masters Modifications & Accessories 2 10th December 2006 13:49


All times are GMT +5.5. The time now is 10:16.

Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Team-BHP.com
Proudly powered by E2E Networks