Go Back   Team-BHP > Buckle Up > Travelogues


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 2nd June 2012, 23:49   #1
BHPian
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Delhi
Posts: 25
Thanked: 14 Times
Default Travelogue: Drive to Joshimath and Kuari Pass Trek in End April 2012

Folks,

Have just joined the forum a few days back and it is with great anticipation and excitement that I write my first post. I hope it is useful (and entertaining) for fellow BHPians.

My first post should actually be my Verna ownership review but I want to take some more time to work on it before I post; so here is my first post - travelogue on a long anticipated driving and trekking trip in the Garhwal region.

For me, trekking has been that one thing that I have wanted to do much more than I have been able to in real life. Though this is true for a lot of other things like driving around the globe, playing the guitar, taking looong drives, playing Angry Birds the whole day, flying a plane etc etc, the yearning (and practicality) of being able to undertake trekking has been much greater.

And here I was, in between jobs, with a break that I could use as I chose to! I had one week before I had to join my new job on the 7th of May. I frantically began to search for trekking options. My criteria was clear; the trek had to be
- a 4-5 day trek (excluding travel ex-Delhi to and from trek start point)
- must include camping and not have any civilized places to stay at overnight
- must be beyond an altitude of 3000m at least
- start from a place which was a sufficiently long drive away from Delhi

While the first condition was dictated by the time constraint I had, the 2nd was more because I had never done a trek that involved camping. As a child, visiting grandparents in Nainital had seeded in me a very deep liking for the mountains and the several small treks I had done as a child fuelled my passion to keep going back to them even after my grandparents long expired. The third condition was to ensure there was enough challenge. This meant that I looked for only the “moderate” category treks. The fourth condition needs no explanation!

Hundreds of hours of googling and very much more productive tens of hours on team-BHP (and another forum - indiamike) had me narrowing down to The Kuari Pass trek and Sundardungha valley trek. Somehow, for reasons I do not remember or perhaps sheer gut feel, Kuari Pass made the cut finally.

Being the discerning “value for money” buyer that I am, I did not leave any stone unturned in finding out the best and most economical guide / porter service providers in Joshimath – the base for the Kuari Pass trek. After speaking / writing emails to some over the course of 1 week, I narrowed down to Himalayan Snow Runners who are recommended by Lonely Planet.

I must clarify though that I was specifically against taking some sort of a “luxury” trek where one would be accompanied by several mules and porters and blah and blah spoiling the whole fun. I consciously wanted to make it a barebone trek ensuring that I had only the bare essentials which would be indispensible. Two reasons for this – one, and more important, I wanted the trek to be as close to nature, as raw, as challenging as possible and two, I am a VFM buyer to the point of being obsessive about it! *

Let me start the day-wise account from here:

Day 1 (28th April 2012); Kotdwar, here I come! : During my planning for the trip, I spent several hours vacillating over whether I should try to cover the Delhi-Joshimath distance in one day. While it would have been a good kick, I also wanted to ensure that I was fit enough to start my trek the next day. Good advise from my wife led me to decide that I would take a night halt in between. *So while my trek was to start on 30th May, I planned to leave from Delhi on 28th April. Had to attend my brother’s daugther’s birthday party and hence was able to leave only around 415pm instead of the desirable time of 2pm. My target was to cross UP border before nightfall having been advised about potential risk of driving late on the roads of UP. And being the iconoclast that I have always been, I chose to take the route less taken – the one via Meerut-Bijnor-Najibabad-Kotdwar-Srinagar-Rudraprayag-Joshimath. And maybe, another reason I took this route was to at least cross through the place I was born in – Bijnor – to which I had never been after being born there.

So my target was to lay my head in Kotdwar which lies just inside the border of Uttarakhand. That effectively meant that I drove continuously without break from Delhi to Kotdwar hitting the latter at 915 sharp. Was quite pleased with myself and my darling Verna for having done the stretch in 5 hours which I guess is at the lower end of the range. Was lucky to not find too much traffic and surprisingly, the roads were awesome. While Delhi-Meerut is always bad, from Meerut, right upto Kotdwar, the roads were smooth as butter! My little tigress glided over the stretch with ease and pride!*

The last stretch from Najibabad to Kotdwar was a little scary since I was almost completely alone on it (even at ~8pm) with no activity / human beings / cars around. I must clarify though that the “scary” was not in any way due to any threat that I overtly faced – for all I know, this road is one of the safest in the country, but just the sight of an empty road at night kind of gives you the creeps.

Road to Kotdwar

Travelogue: Drive to Joshimath and Kuari Pass Trek in End April 2012-img2012042800044.jpg

There are a few twists and turns on the otherwise straight road which are not so well marked (especially near the cities) – on one such instance, I was at a T-point close to Najibabad with a non-descript board with the arrow for Bijnor and Kotdwar pointed in the same direction!! Now, that was obviously incorrect, so I looked around for someone to ask and all I could find after roaming around a bit (this was just outside of the main city of Najibabad), was three motorcycle borne youth, who looked from all angles characters from a movie like Gangajal! Now, as I realized later, I was clearly paranoid in seeing those simple young folks in this light. But nevertheless, the dark lonely stretch does do things to your imagination; since I had no one else to ask, I pulled over next to these dudes and asked them; one of them got off the motorcycle and started to explain when the other guy turned the motorcycle headlight right onto my face through the car window (and this guy looked completely like what us city-bred, Bollywood-kitsch-watching snobs have been made to believe are goondas) and in a rough voice he said “aap to galat aa gaye”; “chalo mere peeche!!” I turned the car and started accelerating and when they turned to the right from where I had originally come, for some silly reason, I turned away; the poor guys shouted at the top of their voice to guide me back on the right path but Aman Khanna was convinced that these guys were going to kidnap him!! Nevertheless, I lost them, went back into the city, asked and found out that those guys were right and sheepishly went along on that route; very soon, I could see them in front of me, but this time we were in a busy market; being embarrassed about what I had done, I rushed past them, apologizing to them aloud in my car.

Well, nothing more eventful than that happened in the rest of the journey and soon I was on the main street of Kotdwar asking for GMVN’s tourist rest house (heard these are good, sturdy, trustworthy though basic hotels albeit at the best places in the town); unfortunately could not find it and, on the recommendation of a local, drove upto a place called “Dev Vani”, just off the main highway where I got into an AC room and crashed for the night; had to leave at 5am the next morning for the longer stretch of 10 hours up to Joshimath. Thankfully, had brought along a packed dinner which I relished before settling for the night. Also realized that I had forgotten* to bring the adapter for my phone charger which meant me having no connectivity (read no google maps) the next day. The hotel had good parking space where I slid my little one in to sleep peacefully and get revved up for the longer stretch tomorrow) and the reception guy was very nice and helpful.

Day 2 (29th April 2012); Hilly roads, take me to Joshimath!: The alarm on my Blackberry dutifully did its chime repeatedly until I was wide awake at 445am. Took a quick bath and was ready within minutes to go forth. After some shouting to* call the reception guy (who had locked the main gate), was able to roll out of Dev Vani at 515am. Took full advantage of little / no traffic and drove continuously till 800am by when I was in a rare and extremely dangerous condition – kadak-adrak-tea deficiency!! Did not stop before this partly because the ride was so smooth, partly because the tarmac in front of me was so inviting and partly because I am a sucker when it comes to stopping driving!! Was also hungry but as luck would have it, the place where I stopped (I think it was just before Pauri though I do not remember exactly – can anyone guess from the pic?) only had light snacks (what they called “fan” and looked like wafers). After two cups of tea, some stretching, taking pics and having the “fan”, I was on my way again – the stop being only about 10 minutes.

the chai stop

Travelogue: Drive to Joshimath and Kuari Pass Trek in End April 2012-img_0704.jpg

The road from Kotdwar had been very good, though as all hilly roads, did require good concentration. After Satpuli, there are two roads that lead upto Pauri (as shown by google maps) one of which is shorter and goes via Mohar and the other goes via Pathisan. I looked for the former but somehow still landed up on the latter but had no regrets since the road was good (though in the latter half of the stretch, the road is narrow and one must have good hill driving experience to navigate it). While there was not much traffic, one could find the occasional Sumo shared taxi.

One such Sumo had a particularly eager driver and for some reason had a fancy for racing. He was inching closer to me from behind but even though I gave him a pass on a couple of occasions, he was unable to overtake – this went on for 10-15 minutes when the guy got very impatient and overtook me in a manner that could not be called even remotely safe. When he was in front of me, I was relieved and for a large part of the rest of the journey just kept tailing him. Tailing someone who is fast can be really helpful on hilly roads – the person in front pretty much clears up the road for you and is in the first line of fire in case something untoward happens – really like a shield, so I did not mind tailing this eager beaver. Incidentally, when he crossed me, I could not help notice a bold sticker on the rear window – “Ziddi Boy…”. “Yeah, right, I know, good for you (and me!)” I muttered. J

Pauri is a busy town and the main junction from where one almost take s U-turn to go towards Srinagar had a broken road which took some precious time but was overall ok. My next stop was Rudraprayag at about 1130 by which time I was starving to death. Had parathas on a roadside dhaba with 2 cups of tea, took some pictures and was on my way again within 20 minutes!

About 50kms before Joshimath, it started raining cats and dogs which made driving even more taxing but was fun and also multiplied the enjoyment of driving. I rolled into Joshimath town at 315pm – a complete 10 hours from the time I left; again I gave myself a pat on the back for making it near perfect time. Now there are two GMVN hotels in Joshimath – one in the Main Market and the other one which is called “New”. The “New” one’s access road was blocked so after some back and forth (thankfully the market had no traffic) on the road, I reached the one in the main market, where I took a “deluxe” room – which was very basic but had what was required. *My first task was to charge my phone and camera battery* for which I immediately went out and bought an adapter; also bought some mineral water and snacks. Almost as soon as I plugged my phone into the charger, Ajay Bhatt of Himalayan Snow Runners called and offered to come and talk with me along with my guide to explain the 4-day trek itinerary. I found the proactiveness of these guys refreshing. He came soon enough with the guide – Dinesh Bhatt – who was extremely reticent (I was to discover later that he was actually one of the most talkative persons I have met!). I agreed to carry some of my own load which would perhaps not amount to more than 8kgs. I had the choice of offloading a majority of it to the porter who would be carrying everything else – sleeping bags, our 3 days ration, tents etc. but I reserved that choice until my fatigue would surpass my concern for the porter’s welfare. And also, I wanted to “test” myself – after all in a real real trek (which I hope to do someday) one should carry everything that one needs oneself. We were to start at 930am tomorrow but I made Ajay agree to start earlier at least at 9 – the weather was inclement with every afternoon becoming cloudy and wet, and I wanted to ensure that I could move a good distance on day 1 without letting weather play spoilsport. And of course one could catch the scenic beauty much better before the clouds would drape them in the afternoon.

Rest of the evening was spent walking the main market and seeing, on Ajay’s advise – a temple of the Shankaracharya. GMVN does not serve non-veg so dinner was in a hotel behind GMVN – Shailja where I had butter chicken that was worth dying for (in the process also perhaps taking in all the calories I was going to burn on the 4-day trek!)

Shankaracharya temple in Joshimath

Travelogue: Drive to Joshimath and Kuari Pass Trek in End April 2012-img_0730.jpg

Joshimath main street

Travelogue: Drive to Joshimath and Kuari Pass Trek in End April 2012-img2012050300056.jpg

Day 3 (30th April 2012); Oh, for the love of the Himalayas!: Slept like a log and was at Ajay’s office at 830am after a quick breakfast of omlete and chai at GMVN. Within minutes, we were set to go with the porter (who was a Nepali and fondly called “Dhai”) me and Dinesh and all our stuff in a car on the way to Auli from where the trek would start. The road to Auli was narrow and steep and offered some really good views. On reaching Auli, I found that there was another large group of Marathis also intending to do this trek (albeit in 6 days). The group was full of auntyjis and unclejis and bachchajis yapping away in chaste Marathi. Nice set of folks but I was not particularly amused about having to trek with a crowd.

Various people kept telling us that the weather was particularly bad this year with a lot of snow being there at the peaks and on the way. I had already been told that climbing Pangarchulla (the highest peak near Kuari Pass) would be next to impossible but I had a glimmer of hope that we would be able to do it. In this scenario I was half-hoping that this crowd would give up halfway or just camp midway and spend the rest of their holidays there (which is what really happened later)

Dinesh’s reticence disappeared soon enough and he began telling me of his adventures – apparently he has experience of 15 years as a guide – which I did not have much reason to disbelieve given his rich knowledge (being the sceptic I am, I cross checked some of the things he said and he was almost always right!) and several war stories he told me. He proudly told me that Sonu Nigam would be coming for the same trek after me and that he would be his guide and that Sonu was a Garhwali and how great Garhwalis are. For me, all mountain people are great, so I did not disagree.

Auli has a beautiful ski resort and Dinesh told me that the slopes we were puffing and panting upon are filled with snow in winters and provide the best skiing ground. He is a ski instructor himself and told me of his shop where he rents out skiing equipment. The guy had good cross-selling skills – he offered for me to come with family to try out skiing.*

Starting off!

Travelogue: Drive to Joshimath and Kuari Pass Trek in End April 2012-img_0741.jpg

Like in every trek undertaken after a long break, the first few steps were tough and I was panting like a steam engine and taking frequent breaks but thankfully, the trekker in me caught up with me soon and I started getting comfortable with the climb; though the large crowd was a constant source of irritation.

Picked some flowers on the way – Dinesh was quick to point out that the flowers on this trek were no less than those seen at The Valley of Flowers – and took a tea break after just 20 minutes of walking before moving on towards Gorson Bugyal. *Dinesh claimed good knowledge of the flowers and kept blurting out their names as and when we saw them.

Within about 2 hours of our walk we came to Gorson Bugyal where I saw several campsites. I thought that this would be just a 10 minute stopover after which we would proceed. To my utter surprise, Dinesh came back to me (after chatting with some of his peers) that we would camp there tonight. I was flabbergasted – how could we camp just 2.5 hours after we started at 1145am? I had just about warmed up for a long haul… Like a stubborn kid, I cajoled Dinesh to take us further; he was guarded as clouds were starting to gather (and the supposedly great view from Gorson Bugyal was also fast getting covered up) and the porter also wanted to let off some load (the food that we would eat that day) before moving on. But somehow I could not swallow doing such a short walk when I had been all geared up for at least a 5 hour trek and for reaching a greater height. So, despite my guide’s best advise, we started onwards after a cup of tea and some pictures. I asked Dinesh one last question before we proceeded – “Bhai jaan ka khatra to nahin hai na?”; he replied “Nahin, par risky hai, hume to sab dekhna padta hai na; kya aapko chalega if all your clothes and sleeping bags get wet and we have to shiver through the night in snowfall?”; I said “Yes! As long as jaan ka khatra nahin hai, chalega!”

As feared, very soon it started snowing incessantly and the narrow hill track that one needs to cross to get to Tali became wet and slippery. We were sloshing through the snow and I was shivering to the bone but despite the hardship I had the childlike thrill of taking the challenge. Dinesh had exaggerated the difficulty and length upto Tali (or perhaps underestimated my speed) in telling me that it would take 4-5 hours to reach Tali. I therefore plodded on with all my strength and, to my surprise, we were at Tali within 3 hours! Though it snowed heavily and the narrow path was wet etc etc, frankly, it was not half as dangerous or risky as it was made out to be. So, all in all, I was very happy with myself for pushing Dinesh to bring us on. We also lost the Marathi group in the process and now were on our own.

Narrow slippery mountain "pagdandi"

Travelogue: Drive to Joshimath and Kuari Pass Trek in End April 2012-img_0767.jpg

Tali lake

Travelogue: Drive to Joshimath and Kuari Pass Trek in End April 2012-img_0779.jpg

Tali lake, as anyone who has done this trek will agree, cannot be described in words. It is a phenomenally beautiful small lake surrounded by snow capped mountains that takes forever to take in. We must have stayed there for 30 minutes but I felt like I had been there only a minute when Dinesh said we should move on to our camp site a little further ahead, at Chitrakantha.

With great effort and will power, I pulled myself away from the lake, turning back almost every half a second as it grew further and further away and we walked deeper and deeper into the woods. Once we were sufficiently deep into the jungle, Dinesh began hunting for a suitable campsite. He was to tell me later that the exact location where one should set up camp is determined by several factors and cannot be a casual decision – the direction of the entrance to the tent, level of the site, proximity to (running) water source etc etc were all important. Apparently the reason we could not camp at Tali lake itself (much as I would have liked to) was that the water was still and hence not good for consumption besides the fact that the site being open from all sides would be much colder than inside the jungle. We encountered a couple of friendly people already camping on the way – we exchanged some pleasantries and moved on.
Finally after walking somewhat aimlessly for a while, Dinesh stopped and declared that this was where we would camp tonight. It was a neat little clearing in the jungle. Dinesh and ‘dhai’ set down to set up the tents – they had one tent for the two of them and one smaller tent about 50 meters away for me further into the clearing. They meticulously set up my tent and placed the sleeping bag in it and then went about setting up our little ‘kitchen’. It must have been around 3pm when we were all done – with a cup of steaming hot tea in hand, sitting next to a crackling bright fire (which ‘dhai’ set up after gathering dry wood from around the site; gathering dry wood when it had just snowed was challenging to say the least but the two dudes with me managed it very well) followed by two bowlfulls of Maggi, I was a man content and warm. The latter feeling did not last long, as it began to snow again, light and flaky at first but heavier as time passed. I was enjoying the snowfall so much that I did not realise when the fire went out, when the two dudes disappeared Into their tents and most importantly, when my lower jaw lost all control and began to ram up repeatedly against my upper jaw! Dinesh shouted from inside his tent “sir, thand mean kyon khade ho… Apne tent mean jao”. Very sound advise, that….given that my arms were also losing control over themselves and my whoe body had started to shiver feverishly by then! The temperature must have dropped very sharply and quickly – too fast for me to realise the effect it was having on me. I scampered into my tent, unpacked my sleeping bag with violently shaking hands and slipped into it swiftly. It was only after a full 15 minutes that I began to feel warm. The eager beaver in me compelled me to almost immediately step out of the tent and behold the sight of our now whiter and perceptibly more pristine surroundings.*

Travelogue: Drive to Joshimath and Kuari Pass Trek in End April 2012-img_0809.jpg

Several more photographs later, it was time for dinner @ around 630pm. This was not before at least an hour of sitting close to the fire listening to Dinesh’s stories one after another built around his experiences with several people whom he had guided on their treks.*
Had daal Chawal for dinner and proceeded to hit the sack after attending to nature’s call somewhere in the dark woods (never spent lesser time doing this than today)

The night was not as uncomfortable as I thought (it being my first night ever in a jungle inside a 6 foot tent). I was waking up every hour or so only to doze back off after imagining sounds and movements near my tent of animals and ghosts. Its amazing how fatigue can conquer fear in such times! On every occasion that I woke up I could feel the only part of my body that was not covered by anything – my nose – numb and cold.*

Day 4 (1st May*2012); Global warming? Sez who?:*It must have been about 6 when I woke up and stepping out of the tent saw that the two dudes were already up and about. ‘dhai’ was collecting wood for the fire and Dinesh was just coming around to the state of being awake. “Tea?”, he said. “absolutely!”, I said. Before this, Dinesh broke news that apparently a fox stole our eggs that *he had been carrying and he had kept just outside his tent. I wasn’t particularly pleased about the fact that I would be deprived of my omelette. Wondered if Dinesh with all his experience shouldn’t have known better than to keep the eggs outside… Had to contend with corn flakes for breakfast which were so excessively sweet, I could hardly swallow them. My main nutrition that morning was a pack of rusks.*
After multiple cups of tea and more stories around the fireplace by Dinesh, we packed up and set out for the next milestone – Khullara Pass. Today’s walk was going to be short and easy in Dinesh’s words. Given that he was typically prone to exaggerations, I figured today’s trek would really be like a walk in the park, which in fact it turned out to be. *Before I could even get into the rhythm of walking, we emerged from the woods, almost suddenly, into a wide open meadow surrounded by snow capped peaks all around giving a clear 360 degree view.*
We found one lone soul sitting with a pile of foodstuff packed into steel suitcases under a tent under an overhanging rock. Dinesh informed that this guy had been sitting here for the last 2 days waiting for the Marathi group. Dinesh reckoned that they would have hardly reached Tali by then. The guy told Dinesh a bear had come really close to him the night before, perhaps attracted by the smell of all the food; but apparently the fire lit by the guy had driven the bear away – sleeping alone in the tent that night began to look like a much more challenging prospect after I heard this; my fertile imagination had found another centerpiece around which it would build all sorts of scary scenarios tonight!*
I would have thought this was the perfect campsite but Dinesh proceeded further downward to another smaller clearing and announced that that would be our campsite. Slightly disappointed with the rather limited view for this vantage point, I was inquisitive about why we could not camp at the larger site. Was told that it was more open and hence more cold and also that the ground was wetter there. I decided that the other site was also pretty good and gave majestic views of the Dronagiri, haathi ghoda and several other peaks. The tents were set up quickly with the same dexterity and we were sipping tea next to a nice crackling fireplace soon enough.*
This site had another tent the inhabitants of which were a Gujarati NRI and his guide. Apparently they had left from Joshimath one day before we did and on account of bad weather, had abandoned their original plan of crossing Kuari Pass over to the other side and perhaps visiting some villages there. I was crestfallen because I feared I might have to face the same fate. Let stone climbing Pangharchulla (the highest peak up from Kuari Pass), even going up to Kuari Pass began to look iffy In my head. While I was determined to make an attempt, I was paranoid that Dinesh would veto it. So on every little occasion, I would bring up the topic during conversation trying to get out of Dinesh that were, in fact, going to Kuari Pass tomorrow. He did not decline but kept making oblique references to the weather. My fingers were firmly crossed and a prayer for the weather god was constantly on in my head.*
Sometime during the day we saw a fox roam around the campsite. It drew my ire for depriving us of our eggs, not that there was any overt way in which I expressed that ire…
We lazed around the place – and what a perfect place to laze around it was! I must have taken a hundred photographs from different angles when I decided to start listening to some music.*
There is something about listening to your favourite music while staring into a scenic valley feeling the cool hill breeze rush against your face. Something that is indescribable in any way or any language. Supplement this with a ciggie watching smoke swirl out as you hold it between your fingers and look at the red glow brighten up with every breath you take in and you have got a setting that would surely rival heaven. And then, add light and increasingly heavy snowfall to this setting and you surely have something that far surpasses heaven. That is what exactly happened that afternoon. I was listening to some of my favourite songs (Wishlist and Given to Fly by Pearl Jam, November Rain by GNR, some Alanis and U2 along with Cold Play and REM) and could not resist lighting a cigarette, when it started to snow, first very small light flakes lazily swirling down and settling on my jacket and then faster larger flakes piling up incessantly all over the landscape. Everyone got into their tents but I was standing, arms outstretched, like a man in a trance taking snow right on my face, the feeling was beyond comprehension – it was sheer joy! From the corner of my eye, I saw the NRI scamper past me towards his tent, a confused and amused smile on his face. I lay myself down on a flat rock and for several minutes just let the snow fall on me… When it got unbearably cold, I came back to real life and ran into the tent in which Dinesh, “dhai” and the NRI’s guide were chatting away. *We must have spent 2-3 hours chatting, listening to their stories and sipping multiple cups of tea all the while it was continuously snowing outside. Even the most experienced amongst the three – Dinesh – admitted that such snow was unseen at this time of the year ever. My heart sank a few floors further. But something told me that tomorrow would be a clear day and that I would not return disappointed.*

Enjoying the snowfall

Travelogue: Drive to Joshimath and Kuari Pass Trek in End April 2012-img_0859.jpg

The green peeping from behind the white...

Travelogue: Drive to Joshimath and Kuari Pass Trek in End April 2012-img_0874.jpg

Stepping out of the tent, we beheld a sight that was one of the most beautiful I have ever seen. The green of the landscape was now sparse and peeped from behind a thin layer of white.
The fireplace was lit again (god only knows from where they managed dry wood; though a lot of it was actually wet wood assisted in being lit by kerosene that had been brought for cooking). The fire used to not only warm us up but also very effectively dry up our shoes besides, later being used as the key source for cooking food (when we started running out of kerosene).*

"dhai" next to the fireplace

Travelogue: Drive to Joshimath and Kuari Pass Trek in End April 2012-img_0876.jpg

We had a nice (though extremely cold) evening around the fireplace chatting away. Dinner was roti and daal which, given how hungry I was, had never tasted better. Since I had been cribbing about there being no eggs, Dinesh arranged for his friend (the NRI’s guide) to prepare egg curry for me.*
All the unconventional and unconventionally cooked food I was having had taken its toll on my tummy; the resultant repeated visits to attend to nature’s call deeper in the forest along with the dreaded washing of hands with icy cold water (which set to naught all the effort spent in warming them at the fireplace) was not adding any comfort.*
I left for my tent (which was almost *a 100 meters away from Dinesh’s tent now – perhaps because i had insisted that my tent be setup in a place where i could wake up to the sight of the rising sun) at about 930 and slid into the sleeping bag but just could not control my shivering. My hands and legs were extremely cold and nothing I did warmed them up through the night. It was a rather uncomfortable night with me waking up all almost every half an hour or so because of the cold and on several occasions imagining a bear circling my tent! I wasn’t much bothered about the bear as I knew (and it was confirmed by Dinesh the next day) that the poor animal would be more scared of me than the other way round particularly because I snore exceptionally loudly in my sleep! But the cold was what kept me up much of the night.*

Sunrise behind dronagiri

Travelogue: Drive to Joshimath and Kuari Pass Trek in End April 2012-img_0909.jpg

Day 5 (2nd May*2012); Climbing atop the Virgin (Kuari)!:*I opened my tent as soon as there was some light and witnessed the beautiful sight of a rising sun from behind Dronagiri mountain.*
Today was going to be the day of the big climb and I was thrilled to see a clear sky. I was keen to start early lest the weather gets worse again and was able to push Dinesh to start moving with me by 745am. We had a breakfast of toast and packed parathas to have at the peak.*
The climb was steep and with all the snow quite slippery. It was also very rocky in the beginning making it tough and requiring much concentration. In hindsight, it was only this stretch (Khullara to Kuari pass which could really be called a real good trek; upto Khullara is really picnic in comparison**)*
Puffing and panting along the way, I kept following Dinesh and stepped almost precisely into the foot prints left by him. The snow was soon knee high and where one stepped precisely began to matter more and more as the entire slope was covered with snow with no way for the novice to know where it was at what depth. I took frequent breaks but was up soon enough goaded by the thought of potentially deteriorating weather playing spoilsport. Took a lot of pix and played around a bit in the snow. On several occasions, slipped and had to dig my hands into the snow to pull myself. I had gloves on but the dude Dinesh seemed to have hands of steel! Our shoes were completely wet and my feet were almost completely numb as we moved closer to the pass. The destination is really a ridge preceeded by a couple of slightly lower ridges, each of which offer magnificent views – the most magnificent obviously seen from the one overlooking Kuari Pass itself. The very last stretch was particularly rocky and very steep. The highlight of the last stretch was the slivers of ice hanging from the rocks which created a very attractive sight. Once at the top, the calmness of the place, the sheer tranquility contrasted with the colossal mountains that formed the 360 degree view created a surreal experience. To have reached there in that weather and soft snow gave me a bigger kick than just climbing it on a routine trek would have. We had our packed parathas some bread butter, bananas and took in the view around us for a long time. I was told that Pangarchulla would not be climb-able since the snow was very soft and it would be risky. We could witness it standing taller than everything else commanding respect. On both sides of the ridge that we sat on were steep inclines covered in snow; the inclines would fall and then rise to form the next adjacent ridge. In the distance, one could see the entire mountain range; Dinesh rattled out their names as I looked on in deep amazement.*
Clouds were slowly floating in from the West which made Dinesh insist that we start our descent soon. So we started our descent along the side that had no snow by was significantly steeper than the side we climbed on. Something I had feared happened – my left knee had been troubling me for sometime but I had completely ignored it. I bore the brunt of doing that starting now. Every step I was taking downward with my left foot sent missiles of pain shooting up from my knee. This slowed me down considerably. I promised myself I would get my knee checked soon lest I have my trekking dreams shattered.*
The return was also much more tiring as the adrenalin that had come with the anticipation of the climb was vanishing fast. My feet were extremely cold and wet and the pain in my knee was killing me. I fell far behind Dinesh and had to shout out to him to go slow which he did. But none of this kept the child in me from taking pictures from every possible angle and stop to admire my surroundings repeatedly. Much unlike most people, we took almost as much (or perhaps more) time to come down than we had taken to climb. *The sight of the camp was a huge relief and as it drew closer, my spirits rose (not that they were much low despite the pain and fatigue having just beheld some of the most amazing sights in my life).*

footsteps in the snow

Travelogue: Drive to Joshimath and Kuari Pass Trek in End April 2012-img_0986.jpg

Dont miss the great trekker in the foreground!

Travelogue: Drive to Joshimath and Kuari Pass Trek in End April 2012-picture_149.jpg

We were back at the camp by 230pm and settled down to some tea and biscuits. The sun was still shining bright though occasionally covered by the clouds. ‘dhai’ had cleaned up while we were away and my wet clothes were all dry now. The NRI had left and we were the only ones left at Khullara since the Marathi group had not arrived and the guy waiting with their stuff had also left. Dinesh later pointed out to me a clearing visible from where we were where we could see that group camping.*
The rest of the afternoon and evening were uneventful with the only ‘event’ worth mentioning was that of watching a shepherd guiding his flock along the hillside.*
The clouds did not let me click the famous sunset at Khullara. It started getting colder and we all bundled up in the larger tent having tea and chatting. I decided to sleep in this tent with Dinesh and ‘dhai’ as it was better protected from the winds and would also be warmer by virtue of the greater number of people in it!*
By dinner time exhaustion had had the better of me and I was 80% asleep when I was called out by the fireside for it. *Had roti daal and also subzi in a trance and crashed into the tent almost immediately.*

Day 6 (3rd May*2012); Going down on her:*Today was going to be a tough day for me – one, because I was starting my journey away from the mountains and that had always given me a deep depressing and sinking feeling and two, because today was going to be a steep downward trek which would wreck my left knee!*
But the enthu cutlet that I am, before proceeding back, I wanted to go and spend sometime at the higher meadow which we had left behind on our way to the campsite. I and to capture the views from there. So soon after a breakfast of toast, tea and corn flakes, I went up there and spent around 25 minutes ; the day was clear again and I got some really good shots. Climbing down was hell for my knee and made me dread the ~10km downward trek. The dudes packed up quickly and we proceeded towards the route via the village Dhak. This apparently is the third option for going back (beside the well known Tapovan and Gorson Bugyal routes) and was supposedly more scenic. While going down was painful and made me extremely slow, the meadows on the way, the flowers and the constant shadow of the mountains that walked under made it enjoyable.*

My heart went out to Dinesh – he had hoped to be able to reach down quickly so that he could spend time with his family and having seen my speed climbing, he had assumed that going down would be faster and easier. His dreams were dashed when he saw me limping down and we actually ended up taking way more time than one would normally have. On one occasion, when we were closer to the base, a village woman looked at me from top to bottom limping my way down and asked, disbelief written large on her face, “Kya aap sach main Kuari Pass ja ke aye hai?” she could not fathom how this man limping his way down could climb all the way up. “haan”, I said sheepishly going on to explain that my knee decided to get worked up only on the way down.
This route was particularly scenic as it offered meadows, flowers and thick forest from the clearings in which we would be exposed to the mountain range from different angles as we kept walking. We could also see Tapovan from the route. We emerged from the forest into a large valley which had 4 villages on each side. We walked through a couple of villages, chatting and greeting village folk as we walked. Encountered young kids walking several kilometres up back from school and could help thinking how fortunate I was in being born in a time and place where school buses left no distance to be covered on foot. However, the villages were not particularly backward with an Airtel or Dish TV connection on almost every roof. Dinesh also pointed out a “Homestay” in one of the villages.
Finally, when we were a kilometre away from the main road from where Ajay would come to pick us up, my strength was leaving me and I had to start taking very frequent breaks. So finally we reached the place where Ajay was waiting only around 230 (as against 1230 which waste normal expected time). Had a cup of tea and asked Ajay if my family would recognise me – I was so badly sunburnt that my face (and particularly the nose) was blazing red in *with skin beginning got peel off at several places. The sunglasses had ensured that the top half of my nose was its original color while the bottom half was red and dry with severe sunburn, making me look like a clown. He laughed and assured me that they would.*
I was dropped at my hotel where I took a bath and shaved to regain some semblance of a civilised look. Evening was spent shopping for the family and generally looking around besides some research to figure out my return itinerary. Had chicken dinner at Food Plaza, the most ‘hep’ place in Joshimath before heading back to the hotel. Called up family to inform I had indeed done my first camping trek and returned in one piece.*
My car was parked way behind in the GMVN parking lot with at least 3-4 cards piled up in front. Given that I wanted to leave early, I spoke to each one of the drivers to get an assurance that they would move their cars in the morning. Slept like a log to be woken up by the alarm on my phone at 445am

Day 7 (4th May*2012); Is it already over? Naaaah!:*I was on my way by 515am. There was little traffic and I covered good distance initially. My plan was to stopover at Lansdowne for the night since it would not be much of a detour and would give me another chance to romance the mountains before I went back down to the plains. I wasn’t as lucky as I was on the way up and at one place even somehow lost my way. On multiple occasions, I found myself up against a truck having to backup on a narrow mountain road, navigating a cliff on one side and a deep crevice in the road on the other. NH58 was closed just before Srinagar and I had to take a detour which had a huge pileup of vehicles – it took at least 30 minutes of additional time in my trip.*

My baby's resting as she watches over the river

Travelogue: Drive to Joshimath and Kuari Pass Trek in End April 2012-img_0714.jpg

I reached Lansdowne at about 330pm – had been driving without break except for taking some pictures for over 10 hours; was famished and hungrier than a bear at Khullara*

Nice winding road coming back

Travelogue: Drive to Joshimath and Kuari Pass Trek in End April 2012-img_0711.jpg

Settled into a machaan at GMVN and feasted on parathas and tea. GMVN at Lansdowne is at the best possible location – right next to the highest point – Tip’n'top. There was some confusion on finding it since there is another GMVN in the main market which I reached first and was sent away. The view from my Machaan was fabulous though obviously it paled in front of what I had seen only yesterday. I walked down to the viewpoint at Tip’n'top and spent some time taking photographs along with the tourists.

"machaan" at Lansdowne GMVN
Travelogue: Drive to Joshimath and Kuari Pass Trek in End April 2012-img_1269.jpg

Even though my legs were aching with all the driving and trekking, I decided not to take a cab to the main market and walked down about 2.5kms to it. Besides the desire to see the city, I had to go down also to collect cash from the ATM to pay GMVN. I did not regret walking because I saw all that is to be seen in Lansdowne on the way and took some great pix. First came the church, then the main market and on the way back, Bhulla Tal. I sauntnered into the Garhwali mess, where the guard mistook me for some nada sahib and gave me a huge salute. I could only sheepishly nod in response. On the way back, when I crossed the guard, I kept my eyes firmly down peering into my mobile phone to avoid another embarrassment.*
As luck would have it, the ATM in the Main Market was dispensing cash. This meant I had to walk another kilometre down to Alaknanada to the other ATM. I was declined a lift by an army jawan because he did not have a spare helmet*for which they are apparently very strict on Lansdowne.*

Reaching the ATM in Alaknanda, I was crestfallen to see a long winding queue of army jawans all waiting to get cash. Had no choice but to get in line with my aching legs and inch closer to the machine over at least 20 minutes. But somehow being with the locals chatting with them as we waited for our turn gave me a good feeling. Any opportunity to connect with the locals and live like them rather than being a tourist always gives me a good feeling when I visit a new place. Finally got my cash and briskly walked back up to the hotel.*
Lansdowne has this distinct feeling of a hill station yet unspoiled by excessive tourism. The walk down and back up was refreshing and gave me a taste of the city within the space of 2-3 hours. The serenity of Lansdowne draws you into it and I was finding it difficult to tell myself that I would be leaving tomorrow morning.*
Had a hearty dinner and dozed off watching TV around 1030pm. Had no intention of leaving at 5 tomorrow, given that the longer part of the 15 hour drive was already behind me; the rough targeted leave was 730am.

Day 8 (5th May*2012); Plains, ahoy! :*woke up at 630, caught a few pictures of the sunrise and started to pack. Had two cups of tea and two butter toasts for breakfast and after settling my dues, was on my way. The road down from Lansdowne is not particularly wide and even with less traffic, requires good concentration. It is equally scenic and inviting and made me stop several times to take pictures. Even when one reaches close to the plains, the road winds along the river making the ride distinctly more enjoyable than some of the other hilly roads I have driven on in Kumaon and Himachal. My drive back was good until Meerut after which the painful Meerut – Delhi road with trucks blocking you along the way make your blood pressure rise. Reached home at about 230 to the open arms of a keenly waiting family. My face had skin peeling off at several places and though my wife was kind enough to control her laughter, my baby’s maid could not *help smiling on my face at seeing her Saab turn into a monkey in 1 week of absence.

All in all a memorable trip that will surely be remembered for a long time. May there be more such! And until that happens, I will labor day and night in my next job with a hopeful belief that someday the enjoyment that such a trip brings can be matched by the work I do on a daily basis

View from Tiffin Top in Lansdowne

Travelogue: Drive to Joshimath and Kuari Pass Trek in End April 2012-img_1265.jpg

Other random clicks along the way....
Attached Thumbnails
Travelogue: Drive to Joshimath and Kuari Pass Trek in End April 2012-img_0979.jpg  

Travelogue: Drive to Joshimath and Kuari Pass Trek in End April 2012-img_1014.jpg  

Travelogue: Drive to Joshimath and Kuari Pass Trek in End April 2012-picture_167.jpg  

Travelogue: Drive to Joshimath and Kuari Pass Trek in End April 2012-img_0978.jpg  

Travelogue: Drive to Joshimath and Kuari Pass Trek in End April 2012-img_1073.jpg  

Travelogue: Drive to Joshimath and Kuari Pass Trek in End April 2012-img_1040.jpg  

Travelogue: Drive to Joshimath and Kuari Pass Trek in End April 2012-img_1091.jpg  

Travelogue: Drive to Joshimath and Kuari Pass Trek in End April 2012-img_1154.jpg  

Travelogue: Drive to Joshimath and Kuari Pass Trek in End April 2012-img_1217.jpg  

Travelogue: Drive to Joshimath and Kuari Pass Trek in End April 2012-img_1251.jpg  

Travelogue: Drive to Joshimath and Kuari Pass Trek in End April 2012-img_1249.jpg  

Travelogue: Drive to Joshimath and Kuari Pass Trek in End April 2012-img_1267.jpg  


Last edited by Amankhanna76 : 9th June 2012 at 20:31. Reason: Corrections and pictures added within text
Amankhanna76 is offline   (5) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 3rd June 2012, 11:15   #2
Distinguished - BHPian
 
laluks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Bangalore
Posts: 5,805
Thanked: 7,799 Times
Default Re: Travelogue: Drive to Joshimath and Kuari Pass Trek in End April 2012

What a way to start the activities at TBHP
Interesting log there, and was wondering about the pictures and you had promptly put them

Give us more.
laluks is offline   (1) Thanks Reply With Quote
Old 3rd June 2012, 12:50   #3
BHPian
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Delhi
Posts: 25
Thanked: 14 Times
Default Re: Travelogue: Drive to Joshimath and Kuari Pass Trek in End April 2012

Thank you Laluks!

It feels very good to receive a compliment from a Distinguished BHPian like yourself!

Am in the process of compressing more pictures into less than 1MB format and will post these soon.

Cheers
Amankhanna76 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 3rd June 2012, 14:49   #4
Distinguished - BHPian
 
SS-Traveller's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: New Delhi
Posts: 6,618
Thanked: 10,789 Times
Default Re: Travelogue: Drive to Joshimath and Kuari Pass Trek in End April 2012

Quote:
Originally Posted by Amankhanna76 View Post
...somehow unable to edit the original one to include photographs which I really want to do. Here they are
Nice and descriptive travelogue, and some good photos too. However it would have been nice to have a caption for the photos or have them inline with the text as appropriate. Hope this link (Uploading photographs directly to Team-BHP) helps.
SS-Traveller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11th June 2012, 11:32   #5
GTO
Team-BHP Support
 
GTO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Bombay
Posts: 47,742
Thanked: 89,334 Times
Default Re: Travelogue: Drive to Joshimath and Kuari Pass Trek in End April 2012

Thread moved from the Assembly Line (The "Assembly Line" Forum section) to the Travelogues Section. Thanks for sharing & adding pictures to the opening post!
GTO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11th June 2012, 15:02   #6
BHPian
 
Manuuj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: New Delhi.
Posts: 615
Thanked: 1,028 Times
Default Re: Travelogue: Drive to Joshimath and Kuari Pass Trek in End April 2012

Congratulations on joining our lovely community. Very good start with this lovely TL i must say. I have been to Kedarnath and Badrinath a couple of times and have crossed Joshimath and Auli also. This part of the Himalayas i feel is much more breathtaking than the Himachal Pradesh one. Also the fact that i is still relatively unspoilt really adds to the charm.

Look forward to more from you soon.
Manuuj is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11th June 2012, 23:43   #7
BHPian
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Delhi
Posts: 25
Thanked: 14 Times
Default

Thanks Manuuj. Glad you liked the travelogue!

This side of the Himalayas is definitely more untouched and offers a much greater number of options for exploring the Himalayas.

Having been to Switzerland and stayed there for 4 months (work took me there; am not as rich as to spend this kind of time in such an expensive country otherwise!) and while the mountains are breathtaking, somehow the fact that they are all so easily reachable (through chair cars, trolleys, trains) kind of takes away the fun of climbing them besides turning them into crowded noisy places during season.

There are so many interesting treks available in this part of the Himalayas that it would take me multiple lifetimes to complete them all, but I hope I am able to do at least a few more and post my experiences here.

Cheers
Amankhanna76 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12th June 2012, 14:56   #8
BHPian
 
Manuuj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: New Delhi.
Posts: 615
Thanked: 1,028 Times
Default Re: Travelogue: Drive to Joshimath and Kuari Pass Trek in End April 2012

Quote:
Originally Posted by Amankhanna76 View Post
Thanks Manuuj. Glad you liked the travelogue!

This side of the Himalayas is definitely more untouched and offers a much greater number of options for exploring the Himalayas.

Having been to Switzerland and stayed there for 4 months (work took me there; am not as rich as to spend this kind of time in such an expensive country otherwise!) and while the mountains are breathtaking, somehow the fact that they are all so easily reachable (through chair cars, trolleys, trains) kind of takes away the fun of climbing them besides turning them into crowded noisy places during season.

There are so many interesting treks available in this part of the Himalayas that it would take me multiple lifetimes to complete them all, but I hope I am able to do at least a few more and post my experiences here.

Cheers
Switzerland sure is beautiful. Did your work with the UN take you there? Lucky guy!!

I once did the Kailash Manasarovar Trek which lasted about a month. You cross the entire Himalayan range and then trek on the Tibetan Plateau. It really is fantastic. The trek takes you the entire Garwhal Range and leaves you breathless at every turn.
Manuuj is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12th June 2012, 18:52   #9
BHPian
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Delhi
Posts: 25
Thanked: 14 Times
Default Re: Travelogue: Drive to Joshimath and Kuari Pass Trek in End April 2012

Hey Manuuj,

Yeah, a company-paid Swiss vacation (with a little work thrown in) is not too bad! Was with Infosys Consulting for a brief period when I was sent there. Its my wife who works with the World Bank and the UN badge on my car is courtesy her :P

But frankly, I would consider myself luckier if I had the luxury to do a 1 month trek - the Kailash Mansarovar trek you did must have been truly awesome; but my job with one of the large consulting firms, hardly leaves time for me to eat and sleep! Hence, the meloncholic last line in my travelogue.

Cheers
Amankhanna76 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12th June 2012, 19:44   #10
Senior - BHPian
 
hvkumar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Mumbai
Posts: 7,369
Thanked: 3,354 Times
Default Re: Travelogue: Drive to Joshimath and Kuari Pass Trek in End April 2012

I guess it was a good route to take, via Landsdowne! And also good to know that the roads were good.
How was NH58? Is there road widening work going on?
hvkumar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12th June 2012, 20:04   #11
BHPian
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Bangalore
Posts: 100
Thanked: 283 Times
Default Re: Travelogue: Drive to Joshimath and Kuari Pass Trek in End April 2012

Great post for a first-timer ! You rock with your lovely photographs. Its amazing so see the mighty mountains in the backdrop of your car !

Interestingly, I want to know more about NH-58 conditions as I am planning a road trip on it. Any information you can provide will be appreciated. I am keen on knowing the alternate routes especially on occasions of landslides that are so frequent out there !
raghunandanj is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12th June 2012, 22:29   #12
BHPian
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Delhi
Posts: 25
Thanked: 14 Times
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by hvkumar
I guess it was a good route to take, via Landsdowne! And also good to know that the roads were good.
How was NH58? Is there road widening work going on?
Yes overall, avoiding Haridwar altogether both ways was useful. I was in Rishikesh again recently (May end) on an office rafting offsite and seeing the roads close to Haridwar, I was even more convinced about not taking NH58 all the way. On this route I joined NH58 at Srinagar and except for a few bad patches the road was pretty good all the way to Joshimath. There were some places where recent landslides made the road narrow but widening work didn't seem to be happening.

Lansdowne was a 20-25km detour from this route - too close for me to resist the temptation to turn towards it! Another good not so oft visited place closely is Khirsu - guess I will do it next time I am around this place
Amankhanna76 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13th June 2012, 00:08   #13
BHPian
 
RoadTiger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: CityofRocks
Posts: 120
Thanked: 55 Times
Default Re: Travelogue: Drive to Joshimath and Kuari Pass Trek in End April 2012

Hey Khanna - excellent travelog ! welcome to t-bhp ... this is from an ol' friend from our days in the 'enron-ed' company ... Cheers
RoadTiger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14th June 2012, 00:14   #14
BHPian
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Delhi
Posts: 25
Thanked: 14 Times
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by raghunandanj
Great post for a first-timer ! You rock with your lovely photographs. Its amazing so see the mighty mountains in the backdrop of your car !

Interestingly, I want to know more about NH-58 conditions as I am planning a road trip on it. Any information you can provide will be appreciated. I am keen on knowing the alternate routes especially on occasions of landslides that are so frequent out there !
Thanks Raghunandan! It was so tempting to stop and take pix at every corner; I skipped stopping for food but had to stop repeatedly to capture the pix! And the picture of my Verna poised against the mountains holds such an attraction for me that Someday I am going to get some of these framed and hung on my walls! When I have a house large enough to have walls long enough to hold all the

Well, almost half of my trip was not on NH58 so wont be able to say much about the stretch from Meerut to Srinagar via NH58 except what I wrote in response to another post yesterday. In terms of alternate routes, you could either take the route i took, which was Delhi-Meerut-bijnor-najibabad-kotdwar-Srinagar-rudraprayag-joshimath or Delhi-Meerut bypass-khatauli-muzaffarnagar-roorkee-Haridwar-Srinagar and the same after that. Advantage of the former is that I found the roads to be smooth and lesser traffic; and also that you have other good hill stations to stop by on the way - Lansdowne, Khirsu; disadvantage would be that you have to pass through Meerut and cities like Bijnor etc which can slow you down if you are doing this during the day.

Guess landslides are something you cannot avoid in the Garwhal Himalayas, though you can certainly minimise if you avoid monsoon time for driving on these.

This is but a drop on the ocean of knowledge that you will find on routes, road conditions in several other threads on the forum; make sure you do a search to find these. All the best for your trip!
Amankhanna76 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14th June 2012, 00:26   #15
BHPian
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Delhi
Posts: 25
Thanked: 14 Times
Default Re: Travelogue: Drive to Joshimath and Kuari Pass Trek in End April 2012

Hey Roadtiger,

Good to find old buddies here! Another great thing about being here!

But bro, being a newbie, am not allowed to send (though I guess I can receive), so PM me and let's (re)connect!

Cheers
Amankhanna76 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
A Royal Enfield Bullet ride, a Flight and a sub-zero Ice Trek! [Zanskar Chadar trek] adc Travelogues 49 1st January 2016 13:29
Road condition of NH 58 Delhi to Joshimath vijit.gangwar Route / Travel Queries 18 22nd December 2015 00:07
Food and Stove for Indrahaar pass trek. bhogalrajnish Route / Travel Queries 2 9th June 2011 17:35
Pune to Rishikesh, Joshimath via Rajastan or MP? anandpadhye Route / Travel Queries 3 20th December 2008 08:27


All times are GMT +5.5. The time now is 12:58.

Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Team-BHP.com
Proudly powered by E2E Networks