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Old 1st May 2008, 13:15   #46
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Actually the villagers even get 4000rs compensation per buffalo as per govt rules(livestock killed by wild animals compensation)
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Old 2nd May 2008, 15:05   #47
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Awesome. 3 Tigers in one trip is more than what some see in a lifetime !!! You are one lucky guy !!! And that too in Corbett. Its one place that I have to go.

I've read all Corbett's books and I would strongly recommend everyone to read it. Man Eaters of Kumaon and the man eating leopard of Rudraprayag are just awesome reads. Vivid pictures of the jungle and the excellent way in which its written !! Well with this narration and pictures I'm able to even more vividly imagine how the Corbett reserve must be.

Great job. and I envy you so..... :-)
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Old 2nd May 2008, 15:50   #48
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Totally cool pics! 3 big ones in 2 days! Wow.

We got a little lucky too - 5 herds of elephants, a tiger amongst others on the "Canter" ride - very unexpected. Unsurprisingly, all near the reservoir/river - its the dry season I guess.

Pics:











(Sorry about my lousy pic posting - I copied links from my Picasa folder and thats what I got.)

Last edited by zenx : 2nd May 2008 at 16:02.
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Old 2nd May 2008, 15:53   #49
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Deepak, yours has to among the best travelogues on the forum till date. Just loved reading your experience in the National Park. Had heard alot about it but no idea its so wonderful. Your writing made me feel as if I was there with you all the while in your journey. Now I have one destination which need to visit on my next holiday.
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Old 2nd May 2008, 15:56   #50
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DKG,

This is one great travelougue i've ever read and seen.

Ur narration almost took me to Corbett.

This place has become a must see in my wish list.

Great narration and thanks for the good pics.

Spooky forest yaar, even the pics gives u a grave feeling, Wonder what you would have been going through in the forest.

I am waiting for my Kodachadri Hills forest guest house trip the coming week.
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Old 2nd May 2008, 16:42   #51
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Oops missed out - one more:



We stayed at Kaladhungi since we did not get acco inside the park. The place, Corbett's winter village, and also where he grew up, was about 30 kms from Ramnagar. Theres a nice little museum dedicated to Corbett, and the village he owned behind.
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Old 2nd May 2008, 17:02   #52
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Quote:
Originally Posted by csentil View Post
Awesome.
I've read all Corbett's books and I would strongly recommend everyone to read it. Man Eaters of Kumaon and the man eating leopard of Rudraprayag are just awesome reads. Vivid pictures of the jungle and the excellent way in which its written !! Well with this narration and pictures I'm able to even more vividly imagine how the Corbett reserve must be.

Great job. and I envy you so..... :-)
, The books are really well written, makes you feel like you are in the jungle. I really envy Jim Corbett..........
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Old 2nd May 2008, 17:42   #53
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Brilliant DKG! Absolutely loved the pics and narrative. Thanks a ton for that.

And yes, its about time we start caring for the environment... although nature is massively powerful... it lies on a delicate balance. I hope we dont let it shift.

Incidently I absolutely adore tiger and can truly understand what a majestic site it would be to see it moving in its natural habitat.
Thanks again for taking the pain in writing all this and posting all the pictures.
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Old 2nd May 2008, 17:59   #54
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I had read Jim Corbett's books while in primary school. They were just mind-boggling.

I remember one story which I heard later. During the Burmese campaign in WWII, Jim Corbett was hired as a consultant (when the term was very new I suppose) to train British soldiers in the jungle ways.

One night they were all sitting in a hut in the middle of a jungle in pouring rain and listening to jungle sounds. Jim Corbett points out a sound and tells them it is made by a particular frog. A little later, that sound changes drastically, then he adds that a snake just swallowed the frog.

Couple of soldiers who found it hard to believe, ducked out and found that it was exactly so. They found a snake with a swollen stomach.
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Old 2nd May 2008, 18:20   #55
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What a coincidence, Corbett was featured in DI couple days back Damn Interesting A Large-Hearted Gentleman
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Old 2nd May 2008, 21:40   #56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by csentil View Post
I've read all Corbett's books and I would strongly recommend everyone to read it. Man Eaters of Kumaon and the man eating leopard of Rudraprayag are just awesome reads. Vivid pictures of the jungle and the excellent way in which its written !!
I remember being totally absorbed by Jungle Lore. It stirred me deeply as a child. I believe Oxford University Press has two books called Omnibus 1 and 2 which cover all of Jim Corbetts books. I think they are a Rs 1000 for the set. I need to get it and go through all his books before I head back next.


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Originally Posted by zenx View Post
We got a little lucky too - 5 herds of elephants, a tiger amongst others on the "Canter" ride - very unexpected. Unsurprisingly, all near the reservoir/river - its the dry season I guess.
Isn't the evening by the river magical? It seems to showcase all that's so deeply rich about Indian forests and wildlife. Glad you enjoyed it too.

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Your writing made me feel as if I was there with you all the while in your journey
I am delighted to be able to share a special experience with sensitive and caring people such as you all. Those jungles are so fragile and they definitely need our support and understanding

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Originally Posted by PAVAN KADAM View Post
Spooky forest yaar, even the pics gives u a grave feeling, Wonder what you would have been going through in the forest.
You know Pavan strangely not once did Corbett intimidate me or made me feel uncomfortable. And yet I know people in my immediate family who would probably faint in terror there

Perhaps it has something to do with my personal fascination for trees (can't get over the dense Sal cover) and a lifelong fondness and closeness to animals (had six rhesus monkeys consecutively as pets - eventually when I grew up and realised it was cruel to keep them tied up I stopped keeping them, used to buy them off the street performers to save them the inhumane torture)

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Originally Posted by zenx View Post
We stayed at Kaladhungi since we did not get acco inside the park. The place, Corbett's winter village, and also where he grew up, was about 30 kms from Ramnagar. Theres a nice little museum dedicated to Corbett, and the village he owned behind.
Uttaranchal is enchanting. There's so much to see and do. I know I'd have to go back many a time to do justice to that stunning state.

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Originally Posted by extreme_torque View Post
And yes, its about time we start caring for the environment... although nature is massively powerful... it lies on a delicate balance. I hope we dont let it shift.

Incidently I absolutely adore tiger and can truly understand what a majestic site it would be to see it moving in its natural habitat.
Thanks again for taking the pain in writing all this and posting all the pictures.
In the simplest of ways we could help through tourism. Visiting these reserves is so deeply educational. My nephew was in information overload throughout and it was so much fun to actually spend time explaining how things work in the jungle.

Our money spent also creates employment for the locals and hopefully keeps them off the poaching trade route.

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One night they were all sitting in a hut in the middle of a jungle in pouring rain and listening to jungle sounds. Jim Corbett points out a sound and tells them it is made by a particular frog. A little later, that sound changes drastically, then he adds that a snake just swallowed the frog.

Couple of soldiers who found it hard to believe, ducked out and found that it was exactly so. They found a snake with a swollen stomach.
Wow...imagine sitting with friends and family in the midst of a dense forest at night regaling them with such tales (as we can't do much else!)

I better read all his books and tank up on tales.

You seem to live in very picturesque surroundings going by pictures of your Grand Vitara exploits. BTW that place offers some phenomenal offroading opportunities.

Last edited by DKG : 2nd May 2008 at 21:46.
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Old 2nd May 2008, 22:00   #57
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What a coincidence, Corbett was featured in DI couple days back Damn Interesting A Large-Hearted Gentleman
Lovely reading, thanks for the link. Jim Corbett truly was a fine person and his life and work not only dispels many a myth about these big cats but brings us closer to understanding the tiger and respecting its requirements
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Old 2nd May 2008, 22:21   #58
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Amazing travelogue DKG! And you are one lucky guy!

I love the jungles - felt nostalgic after going through the thread because I have passed through the outskirts of Corbett a few times while coming down from Ranikhet to Ramnagar. And I have the entire hardcopy set of Corbett in two volumes (read multiple times) - a must buy for all nature lovers. His books were a major driver behind my love for wildlife and forests.

Samurai, Corbett used to train the troops for jungle warfare somewhere in the forests of MP. Sad thing is that he caught malignant malaria during this time.

Btw, there are other NPs/ Santuaries where staying in the middle of the forest is allowed - e.g. Hollong (Jaldapara in North Bengal) - the stilted guest house is 7 km inside the jungle, and 100 feet away from a salt lick frequented by Rhinos. One can see the animals from the balcony.

Will contact Tiger Camp in the future - your host seems to be great - and Corbett has been on my 'must visit' list for quite some time.

A suggestion for folks - try carrying (and reading) Man Eaters of Kumaon (or even better, The Man Eating Leopard of Rudraprayag) on a jungle trip - and see how out feels to venture out during the night for a post-dinner walk around the tent/ rest house, or spending some time alone say beside a campfire - outside - just listening to the sounds.

Btw, have been always curious about his two encounters with supernatural though - anyone have more info on the incidents over what are there in his books? I always wondered what could disturb a man like Jim - and how he could believe in those things.
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Old 2nd May 2008, 23:06   #59
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DKG View Post
Lovely reading, thanks for the link. Jim Corbett truly was a fine person and his life and work not only dispels many a myth about these big cats but brings us closer to understanding the tiger and respecting its requirements
I studied in Nainital and his tales are part of folklore. One of the teachers was a Kid when Corbett used to Live in Nainital, as per his tales Corbett was a local hero. Not only because of hunting man eaters, but because he gelled with local people and was well versed in Kumaoni (Local language of region).
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Old 2nd May 2008, 23:31   #60
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nilanjanray View Post
A suggestion for folks - try carrying (and reading) Man Eaters of Kumaon (or even better, The Man Eating Leopard of Rudraprayag) on a jungle trip - and see how out feels to venture out during the night for a post-dinner walk around the tent/ rest house, or spending some time alone say beside a campfire - outside - just listening to the sounds.
Don't remind me man, when I read his books I lived in Coorg, and had to walk to school through roads and even trails surrounded by coffee estates. Coffee estates are practically forest and have wild animals.

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Originally Posted by NetfreakBombay View Post
I studied in Nainital and his tales are part of folklore. One of the teachers was a Kid when Corbett used to Live in Nainital, as per his tales Corbett was a local hero. Not only because of hunting man eaters, but because he gelled with local people and was well versed in Kumaoni (Local language of region).
He was born there, wasn't he.
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