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Old 18th February 2010, 09:28   #61
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As we were waiting for the park gates to open, this wood pecker was tapping for breakfast, Pench.
Tadoba, Pench forests, wildlife and 4 tigers!-img_5365.jpg
A Machan by a waterhole at 6:00 AM, Tadoba.
Tadoba, Pench forests, wildlife and 4 tigers!-img_5128_a.jpg
A morning view from our forest rest house, Kolsa. I have decided to stay here again next time soon.
Tadoba, Pench forests, wildlife and 4 tigers!-img_5296.jpg
Crested Serpent Eagle, Pench. The white feather on its head was something new, as observed by Dr.Ghosh and me.
Tadoba, Pench forests, wildlife and 4 tigers!-img_5377.jpg
Spotted deers grazing before dusk sets in, Pench.
Tadoba, Pench forests, wildlife and 4 tigers!-img_5332.jpg
Our tigress stretching out, Pench.
Tadoba, Pench forests, wildlife and 4 tigers!-img_5539.jpg
...and grooming herself.
Tadoba, Pench forests, wildlife and 4 tigers!-img_5630.jpg
Ears propped up and alert is an indication she is tracking something, (where she headed for probable dinner later in the evening).
Tadoba, Pench forests, wildlife and 4 tigers!-img_5614.jpg
Further fine tuning.
Tadoba, Pench forests, wildlife and 4 tigers!-img_5621.jpg
Tourist and Tiger Patrol as her audience.
Tadoba, Pench forests, wildlife and 4 tigers!-img_5489.jpg
Dr. Ghosh with the Hyderabad team and his Gypsy, just before goodbye for now.
Tadoba, Pench forests, wildlife and 4 tigers!-img_5685.jpg

Last edited by fazalaliadil : 18th February 2010 at 09:46.
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Old 18th February 2010, 09:49   #62
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moralfibre View Post
How do you protect yourself in case the tigers attack?
Very good question. I asked the same during my visit to Corbett and a couple of guys who work the ranges said the same thing

1. We are NOT a part of the Tiger's food chain. Which means everytime a Tiger sees you in the forest it does not salivate

2. Wild animals generally are shy and fear humans

3. Unless an animal feels threatened it won't attack

4. Often a Tiger will try to call a bluff by a mock charge only to send a warning that your presence/proximity is not welcome

5. In the event you do confront an aggressive animal stand tall, raise arms and make noise. Don't run as it encourages the animal to attack. If you are in a open Jeep stand in the car.

6. If you are in a car and are confronted by a Tiger and its walking toward you try to reverse and eventually allow it its way.

7. If the animal is aggravated and launches a full fledged attack and you have no way to exit from the situation face the animal and fight it with whatever you can have.

Apart from the above the following are some primary precautions one must take to reduce chances of aggravating a wild animal

1. Wear clothing that blends with the foliage and does not cause visual noise. Wearing bright coloured clothing is a strict NO NO

2. Never go into a forest alone without a guide. Its plain suicidal.

3. Noise ensures wild animals stay away from you. So if you wish to sight animals stay very quiet and move gently

4. In Tiger country never walk into a forest. In a car you are perceived as a larger creature. Also the animals become familiar with ranger cars and don't perceive them as threats. Just see the pictures from Fazal's recent trip. You have a wild Tiger on its back relaxing like a house cat would do. It implies it was perfectly at ease in the presence of the cars and people watching. Its become used to this and does not perceive a threat

5. Never carry food in open containers as it may attract unnecessary attention of wild animals. Rangers in parks in the US state that food at camp sites is the single biggest cause for man animal conflict (bear attacks)

6. Don't play music or talk loud in a forest

7. Avoide smoking as a casual cigarette can trigger a devastating fire

Disclaimer: Neither am I a wild life expert nor a forest conservator. I have only repeated what I have heard from people who actually work in these forests. I too don't believe in being foolhardy and taking chances, hence I made an attempt to understand some of these basics.

For your kind info many a foreign tourist has been attacked and killed in Tiger country in India because they get too carried away and compromise the above safety standards. Much of the news doesn't get advertised because it gives the sanctuary a bad name

In summary these are extraordinarily powerful animals that can rip a human apart in no time. They are not cute pets to be made friends with. You MUST maintain a respectful distance from all wild animals and not aggravate them in any way. If you take these basic precautions you really need not fear for your safety as much as you don't need to fear for your life while on a highway observing traffic rules.

If you observe basic forest ettiquete the chances of your getting hurt/attacked are very remote. I know people who have been in the presence of Tigers in many sanctuaries many a time and for decades now. For them its only been an experience of awe, joy and sheer beauty.

PS: If I have missed out anything Fazal please do add as this question is very relevant for all prospective visitors

Last edited by DKG : 18th February 2010 at 09:51.
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Old 18th February 2010, 10:04   #63
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moralfibre View Post
Excellent coverage and an eye opener thread.

I have a question (rather stupid question). How do you protect yourself in case the tigers attack? Pardon my ignorance but you are traveling in open / soft top gypsy's.
Moralfibre,
It certainly is not a stupid question. This is what we ask ourselves whenever we are close to one. There is no way you can save yourself should it decide to attack, Period.
Check this 2004 video shot in Kaziranga, Assam. This footage shows a tigress leaping about 10 feet high, on to a elephant to attcak the mahout, she covered about 150 yards in 6 leaps including the one which landed her on the elephant. She was to be tranquilized by the forest officials using a dart gun.



So do you still think your question is stupid?

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Old 18th February 2010, 10:14   #64
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DKG View Post
Very good question. I asked the same during my visit to Corbett and a couple of guys who work the ranges said the same thing

1. We are NOT a part of the Tiger's food chain. Which means everytime a Tiger sees you in the forest it does not salivate

2. Wild animals generally are shy and fear humans

3. Unless an animal feels threatened it won't attack

4. Often a Tiger will try to call a bluff by a mock charge only to send a warning that your presence/proximity is not welcome

5. In the event you do confront an aggressive animal stand tall, raise arms and make noise. Don't run as it encourages the animal to attack. If you are in a open Jeep stand in the car.

6. If you are in a car and are confronted by a Tiger and its walking toward you try to reverse and eventually allow it its way.

7. If the animal is aggravated and launches a full fledged attack and you have no way to exit from the situation face the animal and fight it with whatever you can have.

Apart from the above the following are some primary precautions one must take to reduce chances of aggravating a wild animal

1. Wear clothing that blends with the foliage and does not cause visual noise. Wearing bright coloured clothing is a strict NO NO

2. Never go into a forest alone without a guide. Its plain suicidal.

3. Noise ensures wild animals stay away from you. So if you wish to sight animals stay very quiet and move gently

4. In Tiger country never walk into a forest. In a car you are perceived as a larger creature. Also the animals become familiar with ranger cars and don't perceive them as threats. Just see the pictures from Fazal's recent trip. You have a wild Tiger on its back relaxing like a house cat would do. It implies it was perfectly at ease in the presence of the cars and people watching. Its become used to this and does not perceive a threat

5. Never carry food in open containers as it may attract unnecessary attention of wild animals. Rangers in parks in the US state that food at camp sites is the single biggest cause for man animal conflict (bear attacks)

6. Don't play music or talk loud in a forest

7. Avoide smoking as a casual cigarette can trigger a devastating fire

Disclaimer: Neither am I a wild life expert nor a forest conservator. I have only repeated what I have heard from people who actually work in these forests. I too don't believe in being foolhardy and taking chances, hence I made an attempt to understand some of these basics.

For your kind info many a foreign tourist has been attacked and killed in Tiger country in India because they get too carried away and compromise the above safety standards. Much of the news doesn't get advertised because it gives the sanctuary a bad name

In summary these are extraordinarily powerful animals that can rip a human apart in no time. They are not cute pets to be made friends with. You MUST maintain a respectful distance from all wild animals and not aggravate them in any way. If you take these basic precautions you really need not fear for your safety as much as you don't need to fear for your life while on a highway observing traffic rules.

If you observe basic forest ettiquete the chances of your getting hurt/attacked are very remote. I know people who have been in the presence of Tigers in many sanctuaries many a time and for decades now. For them its only been an experience of awe, joy and sheer beauty.

PS: If I have missed out anything Fazal please do add as this question is very relevant for all prospective visitors
Deepak,

Yours is a very valuable advice for all.

When a tiger feels threatened only then it attacks, Numerous reasons for that are:

If you are too close to it and encroach upon its personal space.

If she is having her cubs close by, every thing including other adult tigers are potential threat,
(she can take on a male nearly double her size to defend her cubs).

When a pair of tigers are mating.

It could be none of the above.


Disclaimer: Neither am I a wild life expert nor a forest conservator.

Regards,
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Old 18th February 2010, 10:23   #65
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The most fascinating tales I've read of man animal encounters are Jim Corbett's experiences. I remember as a child I was mesmerised and riveted to those accounts. The man was truly amazing.

He was primarily a hunter and its his passion for hunting that led him to understanding animal behaviour so well that eventually when he reformed to becoming a conservator he used his skills to a very positive effect.

He always worked on foot and since he is most well known for culling several man eating tigers and leopards his accounts of how he stalked the animals, the animal's intelligence in reading human movement etc and how he countered the animal's strategies is mind blowing.

His books are a must read for any wildlife enthusiast.

Quote:
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The most fascinating tales I've read of man animal encounters are Jim Corbett's experiences.
His books are a must read for any wildlife enthusiast.
Also, Keneth Anderson.

Last edited by Eddy : 18th February 2010 at 10:38. Reason: Please use the edit / multiquote option instead of posting back to back posts within 20 mins. Thanks.
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Old 18th February 2010, 10:49   #66
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Originally Posted by abheekg View Post
yes kaushik, your thread is long due. when r u planning to come down next with your monster ?

regards,
Dr. Abheek Ghosh
Ya i will be posting it soon. What is the best time(from the POV of tiger sighting) to visit according to you? Last time we were there in April.
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Old 18th February 2010, 11:09   #67
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Excellent again you two. Thanks a lot. I must muster up some courage and make a trip. Lets see how it goes.
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Old 18th February 2010, 12:20   #68
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Sorry for going off-topic, but what is pointing a gun at the tigress all about in the video?! You enter the tigress's territory giving her threatening vibes and expect her to stay calm?! Come on, it's the way mother nature made them!
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Old 18th February 2010, 12:35   #69
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Originally Posted by Jayabusa View Post
Sorry for going off-topic, but what is pointing a gun at the tigress all about in the video?! You enter the tigress's territory giving her threatening vibes and expect her to stay calm?! Come on, it's the way mother nature made them!
Jayabusa,
You are right about pointing the gun at her, it is a tranquilizer dart gun, its use was for her own welfare, her reaction was natural and justified. The video clip is posted in response to a question on the thread, to show her capability and not to admonish her action.
Regards,
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Old 18th February 2010, 13:11   #70
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Amazing pics with very detailed travelogue. I wish i should make a trip here. Thanks for sharing
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Old 18th February 2010, 14:09   #71
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Amzing Report Fazal & great pics, thanks for sharing

Quote:
Originally Posted by DKG
7. If the animal is aggravated and launches a full fledged attack and you have no way to exit from the situation face the animal and fight it with whatever you can have.
Yeah Right

But seriously Elephant & cars are same(i.e. if someone thought Elephants to be safer) as a Tiger can reach both with equal ease
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Old 18th February 2010, 14:19   #72
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Amzing Report Fazal & great pics, thanks for sharing
Yeah Right
But seriously Elephant & cars are same(i.e. if someone thought Elephants to be safer) as a Tiger can reach both with equal ease
And at unimagineable speed, watch real time speed on video.
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Old 18th February 2010, 14:30   #73
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But seriously Elephant & cars are same(i.e. if someone thought Elephants to be safer) as a Tiger can reach both with equal ease
My hosts at Corbett related a funny/scary incident when a foreign wildlife photographer thought he was well protected on elephant back and when in the vicinity of a tiger he kept urging the mahout to move closer. The mahout apparently warned that its not advisable to get so close but the guy persisted saying he needed to get a closer shot. I believe the Tiger irritated let out a loud roar and cleared the elephant going over the tourist. Apparently the guy was so shattered he wet his pants!!

BTW did you guys read a recent article about a lady who warded off a shark which bit her by hitting it on the nose?
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Old 18th February 2010, 14:39   #74
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GREAT LOG BROTHER!!!

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Originally Posted by fazalaliadil View Post
And at unimagineable speed, watch real time speed on video.
That is an unbelievable video, proves the power of the tiger and how high it can leap.

Last edited by KSM-Vtec : 18th February 2010 at 14:56.
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Old 18th February 2010, 14:47   #75
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There's another awesome video I'd like you guys to see. This was taken by my host just 10 days before we arrived in Corbett. While driving up to Vanghat they got blocked at a road with a Tigress wanting to cross with her cubs. See what it does, will give you a taste of what it means to be face to face with one of nature's most awesome creations



If this link doesn't open please do a search for Vanghat Tigress in google
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