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Old 3rd November 2012, 17:12   #1
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Default Tyre Safety = Your Safety. How to care for your Tyres

I couldn't find a thread dedicated to Tyre and Wheel safety so i'm starting one because tyre failure incidents are being reported frequently nowadays. Dear Bhpians please feel free to add to this. Tyre care is often neglected in India and with roads capable of sustaining extended high speeds coming up at various parts of the country its time that one paid attention to his vehicle's tyres and wheels.

Rule # 1
Never under inflate the tyres if you drive on highways. This is the most dangerous thing to do if you drive at highway speeds.

Rule # 2
Maintain proper inflation pressures for the load and speed conditions.

Rule # 3
Never try to correct the air pressure in the middle of a highway drive by filling up/letting out air on a hot tyre. If you need to allow the tyre to cool down. If you don't you will probably end up with much lower pressures than you began with.

Rule # 4
Repair a tubeless tyre properly in case of punctures. If your tubeless tyre was repaired by inserting the plug from the outside you should understand that it is a temporary fix. The puncture should be fixed from the inside for ultimate reliability before you put into high speed use. PS: Does anyone know if such proper repairs are being done in India?

  • Check the overall condition of your tyres weekly. Look for bulges, cuts, thread separation and nails/other objects.
  • Check the tyre pressures monthly atleast from a good or well maintained tyre inflation unit. I don't believe in Nitrogen filling of road tyres but i top up with Nitrogen because the machine they dispense it from looks new and thus probably better calibrated than the regular inflation unit. One top up costs 30 bucks for all tyres and i think 30 bucks per month (360/year) is not too much. If the shop has a well calibrated automatic unit for Air inflation then probably its better to just use air.
  • Rotate your tyres as specified in your owner's manual.
  • Keep a check on tread wear pattern.
  • Get the wheel alignment done as specified in the owner's manual and/or after any suspension related work that has been carried on.

Points i can remember off my head ends here. You can keep adding to this list.

Now for some informative stuff from tyre company websites:

Quote:
Important points to maintain correct inflation
  • Inflation pressure must be adjusted to load.
  • Follow inflation pressure recommendations issued by the automaker. If there are no guidelines from the car maker, tire manufacturers can supply the information.
  • Air pressure can naturally decrease over use so regular checks should be made.The best time for checking air pressure is before long distance driving or at least once a week.
  • Due to casing deflection, all tires generate heat and higher inflation pressure during operations which return to original levels after cooling. The rise in pressure during driving is normal and therefore should not be ‘bleeded’- reducing pressure in tires which have warmed up which results in an increase in pressure above their starting pressure. If air is let out in this state, underinflation can result, causing CBU(Cord Broken Up or Seperation). Air pressure must be measured in a ‘cold’ state. Driving just 2km can increase inflation pressure by about 4psi, so when adjusting pressure in a ‘hot’ state, add about 4psi over the recommended pressure in a cold state.
  • Raising air pressure (0.2~0.3kg/cm2) for high-speed driving can prevent against the most dangerous state of standing wave phenomenon and irregular flexing. The higher air pressure reduces tire wrinkles and therefore results in lower tire temperatures while more effectively channeling water away on wet surfaces. In the case of dual wheels, both tires must have identical inflation pressures.
  • Air leaks through faulty valves are relatively common. With a tubeless tire, most of the air leaks occur in the area joining the wheel and valve. Checks must be made using soapy water or other means to determine there are no air leaks around the valve area or in the area joining the wheel and tire.
http://www.hankooktireusa.com/Serv/I...m=3&ChildNum=4

Quote:
Inflation Pressure
Proper inflation pressure is essential for achieving maximum performance and mileage. Improper tire inflation pressure can cause severe internal tire damage, which can lead to sudden tire failure and resulting in serious personal injury or death.Improper inflation pressure may result in rapid or irregular wear. Pressures should always be checked when the tires are cold and at least monthly. Under normal tire operation, approximately 1psi of tire pressure will escape every month. Also, for every 10 degrees F change in ambient temperature, tire pressure will change by approximately 1psi.

Vehicle manufacturers list recommended tire pressures for original vehicle tires in the owner's manual or on a placard on the end of the driver's side door or in the glove box.

For continuous high speed driving, tire pressures should be increased by 3 to 5psi above the normal cold inflation recommended.

However, for passenger tires, never exceed the maximum inflation pressure molded on the sidewall. The inflation pressure for light truck tires may exceed that molded on the tire by 10psi. Any recommended front to rear pressure differential should be maintained.
http://www.tiresafety.com/maintenance.asp

Quote:
Enemies of your Tyre

There are three main enemies of the tyre: physical, environmental and 'human factors'. Common enemies include: inflation pressure, road hazards, tread depth, weather conditions, lack of maintenance, load, speed, and so on. With so many enemies of the tyre, it's quite impossible to accurately predict a tyre's service life. Michelin tyres are designed to provide many thousands of miles of excellent service. If not maintained properly, however, they will be subjected to greater wear and damage and, possibly, become unsafe.


The three main enemies of the tyre at a glance:

Physical
  • Age.
  • Wear and damage (punctures, cuts, impacts, cracking/crazing of the tread/sidewall rubber, lumps and bulges, etc).
  • Driving over pot-holes, kerbs, speed humps etc.


Human factors
  • Failure to routinely check your tyres for wear or damage.
  • Failure to maintain correct tyre pressure (over or under inflated)
  • Re-inflating a tyre that has been run flat or seriously under inflated.
  • Using a spare tyre of a different size at speeds in excess of 50 mph.
  • Failure to notice a change in handling, noise or vibration.
  • Mixing tyre types.
  • Not having tyre damage inspected by a professional
  • Failure to have a tyre inspected immediately after a severe impact.
  • Driving style.
  • Using different sizes and types of tyre.
  • When towing: Failure to increase the towing vehicle's rear tyre pressures - and not reducing them after towing.
  • Not replacing a tyre valve when replacing tubeless tyres.
  • Carrying out repairs yourself and not through tyre specialist.
  • Considering temporary repairs as a permanent solution.
  • Using tyres on damaged, distorted or modified wheels.
  • Using wheel and rim sizes that are not compatible.
  • Removing and/or fitting tyres yourself rather than using a trained tyre specialist.
  • Not balancing tyres after they are fitted or replaced.
  • Fitting tyres that do not have a speed capability and load index at least equal to or higher than those originally specified by the vehicle manufacturer.
  • Use of sealants that have not been approved.
  • Using summer tyres in snow and ice conditions.
  • Improper tyre storage.

Environmental
  • Extremes of temperature.
  • Rain, ice, snow.
  • Oil, grease and other chemicals.
  • Strong sunlight and ozone.
http://www.michelin.co.uk/tyres/lear...es-of-the-tyre

Last edited by Sankar : 3rd November 2012 at 17:30.
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Old 3rd November 2012, 17:25   #2
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Default Ten Tyre Care Tips

The following is available on their respective websites, but pasting it here to make sure that its available to us even if the content in the original site becomes unavailable sometime in the future.

Quote:
Ten Tyre Care Tips

It’s easy to forget that tyres are the only point of contact between your vehicle and the road. That is why it’s extremely important to preserve the quality and performance of your tyres to ensure both your safety and your mobility. To do so, we advise that you comply with the following recommendations.

1. Contact Patch

The part of your tyre that’s actually in contact with the road is only about the size of your hand. Your safety, comfort and fuel economy depends on that very small area. Make sure you not only select the right tyres, but also regularly maintain them to ensure they perform at their best. It’s important because your tyres:
  • Are the only link between your vehicle and the road
  • Carry the entire weight of your car, a load of up to 50 times their own weight
  • Respond to driving inputs such as steering, acceleration and braking from the car to the road surface
  • Absorb every obstacle on the road

2. Tyre Wear and Depth

Make sure to regularly check the tread depth of your tyres and replace them when they are worn. This will guarantee maximum traction and grip, helping you avoid any unpleasant surprises. Change your tyres before your tread depth is worn to 1.6mm. To make life easier, Michelin tyres are equipped with tread wear indicators situated in the base of the main tread grooves at the height of 1.6mm. Your safety and mobility depend on a good level of tread depth because:
  • The tread grooves disperse water from underneath your tyre, helping maintain control
  • The more tread depth you have remaining on your tyres the more water they can disperse, reducing the risk of aquaplaning.
  • Correct air pressure, as well as regular vehicle maintenance, will ensure your tyres perform at their best for the longest possible time.

3. Tyre Pressure
CHECK YOUR TYRE PRESSURE EVERY MONTH

Correct tyre pressure reduces the risk of losing control of your vehicle. It also protects your tyres from premature wear and irreversible damage to the internal construction. Tyre pressure can drop due to small perforations, the natural escape of air through the tyre's components, or even from a decrease in ambient temperatures. Check the pressure of your tyres, including your spare, monthly and before any long journey, preferably when your tyres are cold (not having run for at least 2 hours or having run for less than 2 miles at low speed). If they are not checked in this cold condition, add 4 to 5 PSI (0.3 bar) to the recommended pressure, but never deflate a hot tyre. It's important to check the pressure once a month, because:
  • Under or over inflation can reduce the life of your tyres, affect their performance and increase the risk of damage.
  • Correct tyre pressure will even save fuel

The recommended tyre pressure can be found:
  • in the user manual of your vehicle
  • or on a label on the door or door frame of the vehicle
  • or on the inside of the fuel flap

The recommended tyre pressure is NOT located on the tyre. The inflation pressure shown on the tyre sidewall is the maximum tyre inflation pressure.


4. Balancing

Balancing helps prevent premature wear of your tyres and eliminates vibration. It also protects the suspension, steering system and bearings of your vehicle. Have your wheels balanced when a tyre is replaced, a balance weight is moved or removed, or you purchase new tyres. You’ll know a wheel is out of balance when one area is heavier or lighter than the rest. This will cause:
  • Uneven and rapid tread wear
  • Vibration
  • More stress on front-end parts
  • Front-end parts to wear prematurely

5. Wheel Alignment

It's difficult to tell if your wheels and axles are correctly aligned while driving. But if your vehicle's suspension geometry is incorrect, its handling may be altered and your safety compromised. If your tyre has come into contact with a solid object, such as a kerb or pothole, or you have noticed uneven wear on your tyres, please go to a tyre specialist to have it thoroughly inspected. It's important to ensure correct alignment to:
  • Get the best road handling
  • Protect your tyres from irregular and/or rapid wear
  • Save fuel

6. Rear Tyres

FOR COMPLETE CONTROL, FIT YOUR NEW TYRES TO THE REAR AXLE

Rear wheels are not connected to your steering wheel, which makes it extremely difficult to judge their grip while driving. We recommend that new tyres or the least worn tyres are fitted to the rear wheels to ensure:
  • Better control in emergency braking or tight corners when the roads are slippery.
  • Less risk of losing control of your vehicle, especially on wet surfaces
  • Better road holding, particularly in difficult situations, whether your car is front or rear wheel drive

7.Tyre Valves

Valves and their components are ordinarily made of rubber, so they are subject to deterioration over time. Replacing them when you buy new tyres is an inexpensive way to protect your tyres, vehicle and yourself. At high speeds, a cracked, deteriorated rubber valve stem can bend from centrifugal force and allow air loss. The valve cap is also important. It’s the primary air seal and helps to keep out dust and dirt particles. You should check that your valves and valve caps are in good condition to:
  • Maintain an airtight seal
  • Maintain the correct tyre pressure
  • Ensure longer tyre life

8. Handling and Storage

Even when they’re not being used, tyres can find themselves in hazardous terrain. Unless they are assembled and inflated, tyres should never be stored in stacks for long periods of time and you should avoid crushing the tyres under objects. It’s extremely important to keep stored tyres away from any flame, any other heat source or any substance capable of causing sparks and/or electrical discharges (i.e. battery generators). When handling tyres, it’s also recommended that you wear protective gloves. Tyres should be stored:
  • In a ventilated, dry and temperate area, protected from direct sunlight and precipitation
  • Away from any chemicals, solvents or hydrocarbons
  • Away from any object capable of penetrating the rubber (pointed metal, wood, etc.)

9. Tyre Repairs

When a tyre needs repairing, it’s essential to have a tyre specialist remove the tyre from the wheel and inspect it from the inside. This is necessary because internal damage is not visible while the tyre is mounted to the wheel. A tyre specialist will:
  • Ensure compliance with procedures for assembly, disassembly, balancing and inflation of the tyre, and the replacement of the valve.
  • Verify the internal condition of the tyre, detecting any damage not visible on the surface.
  • Ensure the tyre is refitted correctly, optimising handling and comfort.
  • Ensure compliance with manufacturer's and legal rules in the choice of tyres: structure, size, speed code, load capacity rating.
  • Ensure compliance with the vehicle manufacturer's recommended pressures.
  • Take account of the instructions and warnings on the tyre sidewalls (rotation direction or assembly direction).
  • Take account of the characteristics of specific tyres (low section height, run-flat, self - sealing tyres, etc.).

10. Service Life

KNOW WHEN TO REPLACE YOUR USED TYRES

Accurately predicting the serviceable life of any specific tyre in advance is not possible. A tyre is composed of various materials and rubber compounds that affect its performance. Its performance also depends upon many other factors such as weather, storage conditions, and conditions of use. That's why we strongly encourage drivers to regularly inspect their tyres to identify anything which means that the tyre needs to be removed from service.

As well as regular tyre inspections and maintenance, drivers should:
  • Have tyres that have been in use for five years or more inspected by a specialist at least annually.
  • Follow the vehicle manufacturer's tyre replacement recommendation.
  • Replace tyres still in service ten years or more from the date of manufacture with new tyres, even if they appear serviceable and even if they have not reached the legal wear limit.
http://www.michelin.co.uk/tyres/lear...tyre-care-tips

Quote:

Check your tyre pressures at least once a month

Having the correct inflation pressure in your vehicle’s tyres not only optimises the performance but also increases your personal safety when driving.

As a guide you should check your tyre pressures at least once a month, and before long journeys. Ignoring this advice runs the risk of decreasing your grip and increasing your braking distances. You could also damage your tyres reduce their lifespan and increase your fuel consumption.

The recommended tyre pressure levels for front and rear tyres are often different. If you’re not sure what your tyre pressures should be, or even how to check tyre pressure, why not spend a couple of minutes reading the following article? It could save you more than the cost of replacing a tyre.


When did you last check your tyres?
When was the last time you checked the pressure of your tyres? Not sure?
You’ve just answered why so many people drive with dangerously under inflated tyres. Checking your tyre pressure is inexpensive and simple. Yet why do so many of us fail to weigh up the costs of ignoring this vital procedure?

Driving with incorrect tyre pressures can affect a vehicle’s handling, and can seriously compromise safety—leading to incidents that can put lives at risk.

If your tyres are over or under inflated enough to be considered un-roadworthy, reading this article could save you a fine of up to £2,500 per tyre.

The correct pressures for your vehicle can normally be found in your owner's manual. The information may also be marked on the vehicle (for example on the driver’s door pillar, or on the inside of the petrol flap). In most cases, two different sets of pressures are given:
• For 'normal' driving conditions.
• For a loaded vehicle (with extra people or heavy items on board).

To check your tyre inflation pressures you will need a tyre pressure gauge or use the gauge on the inflation equipment found at most garages and petrol stations.

See below how tyre pressures can affect safety:

ENDURANCE
Driving on under-inflated tyres reduces their endurance capabilities, leading to deterioration that could even result in a rapid deflation.
7 psi (0.5 bar) or more under inflated = DANGER

ROAD HOLDING
With under- inflated tyres, the vehicle's steering is less precise.
If a bend can be taken at 62 mph (100 km/h) at a tyre pressure of 29 psi (2.0 bar), this speed drops to 54 mph (87 km/h) at 15 psi (1.0 bar), or about 8 mph (13 km/h) less.
Lower pressures = worse road holding

AQUAPLANING
If tyre pressures are 30% below the recommended pressure there is a sharp increase in the risk of aquaplaning.
Lower pressures = higher risk of aquaplaning

BRAKING
In addition, tests show that braking distances from 56 mph (90 km/h) to 43 mph (70 km/h) are 40 metres at 29 psi (2.0 bar) but 45 metres at 15 psi (1.0 bar), that's 5m longer.
15 psi (1.0 bar) under inflation = 5m longer braking distance

FUEL CONSUMPTION
Tyres under inflated by 15 psi (1 bar) have increased rolling resistance leading to around 6% greater fuel consumption.
http://www.michelin.co.uk/tyres/lear...tyre-pressures
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Old 3rd November 2012, 17:37   #3
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Default re: Tyre Safety = Your Safety. How to care for your Tyres

I agree with all points,but,

Rule 4(Is debatable):-I doubt if any follows it,and i myself dont,using tubeless tyres for the past 7 years on 4 and two wheels,never faced any problem due to fixing a puncture from the outer side.
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Old 3rd November 2012, 22:44   #4
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Default re: Tyre Safety = Your Safety. How to care for your Tyres

Quote:
Originally Posted by akshay4587 View Post
I agree with all points,but,

Rule 4(Is debatable):-I doubt if any follows it,and i myself dont,using tubeless tyres for the past 7 years on 4 and two wheels,never faced any problem due to fixing a puncture from the outer side.
Yes Akshay i've also had tubeless puncture repaired the easy way and never had any problems and most of us won't either. But the proper way is to get the tyre removed and get the puncture fixed from inside. Probably this is done to prevent the plug popping for any reason and to properly seal the area from the inside. I think its due to our lower average speeds that we are not facing any issues after such external repairs.

Videos showing proper (permanent) tubeless tyre repair method.








Last edited by Sankar : 3rd November 2012 at 23:02.
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Old 20th November 2012, 10:06   #5
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Default Re: Tyre Safety = Your Safety. How to care for your Tyres

Excellent thread and great pointers.

But the tyre inflation bit is a little confusing to a novice like me. I drive a TJet+ with 205/55 R16 and the patch on the driver side door-frame suggests 36psi front and 33psi for back tyres. But the points mentioned above talk about checking and inflating tyre when "cold" and that a 2km drive cause enough heat to cause incorrect inflation. Now the nearest inflation station (petrol pump) is about 1.5-2kms away and sometimes I use pumps in my way to work which is even further away. In this situation, what should I inflate the tyres too? I asked this to the Fiat service guy and he suggested sticking to the printed number, but I guess he is paid to say that by Fiat.

Please clear this confusion for me friends, I'm sure a lot of new car owners will have the same dilemma.
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Old 20th November 2012, 10:24   #6
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Default Re: Tyre Safety = Your Safety. How to care for your Tyres

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zenster View Post
Excellent thread and great pointers.

But the tyre inflation bit is a little confusing to a novice like me. I drive a TJet+ with 205/55 R16 and the patch on the driver side door-frame suggests 36psi front and 33psi for back tyres. But the points mentioned above talk about checking and inflating tyre when "cold" and that a 2km drive cause enough heat to cause incorrect inflation. Now the nearest inflation station (petrol pump) is about 1.5-2kms away and sometimes I use pumps in my way to work which is even further away. In this situation, what should I inflate the tyres too? I asked this to the Fiat service guy and he suggested sticking to the printed number, but I guess he is paid to say that by Fiat.

Please clear this confusion for me friends, I'm sure a lot of new car owners will have the same dilemma.

First , buy a good tyre gauge . And if you fill the air after driving < 2 kms then its not a issue. The difference is not significant.

The reason for tyre guage is 90% of the digital machines at the pumps are not calibrated at all! So there will always be difference. If you are filling air when you are on the way to work then i suggest you fill in 2 PSI extra than recommended. Then once you are returning back from office you can check the pressure using the gauge and remove excess air to bring it to right pressure since the tyre will be cold then.Hope this helps
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Old 20th November 2012, 10:24   #7
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Default Re: Tyre Safety = Your Safety. How to care for your Tyres

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zenster View Post
Excellent thread and great pointers.

But the tyre inflation bit is a little confusing to a novice like me. I drive a TJet+ with 205/55 R16 and the patch on the driver side door-frame suggests 36psi front and 33psi for back tyres. But the points mentioned above talk about checking and inflating tyre when "cold" and that a 2km drive cause enough heat to cause incorrect inflation. Now the nearest inflation station (petrol pump) is about 1.5-2kms away and sometimes I use pumps in my way to work which is even further away. In this situation, what should I inflate the tyres too? I asked this to the Fiat service guy and he suggested sticking to the printed number, but I guess he is paid to say that by Fiat.

Please clear this confusion for me friends, I'm sure a lot of new car owners will have the same dilemma.
Hankook says
Quote:
Due to casing deflection, all tires generate heat and higher inflation pressure during operations which return to original levels after cooling. The rise in pressure during driving is normal and therefore should not be ‘bleeded’- reducing pressure in tires which have warmed up which results in an increase in pressure above their starting pressure. If air is let out in this state, underinflation can result, causing CBU(Cord Broken Up or Seperation). Air pressure must be measured in a ‘cold’ state. Driving just 2km can increase inflation pressure by about 4psi, so when adjusting pressure in a ‘hot’ state, add about 4psi over the recommended pressure in a cold state.
http://www.hankooktireusa.com/Serv/I...m=3&ChildNum=4


Michelin says
Quote:
Correct tyre pressure reduces the risk of losing control of your vehicle. It also protects your tyres from premature wear and irreversible damage to the internal construction. Tyre pressure can drop due to small perforations, the natural escape of air through the tyre's components, or even from a decrease in ambient temperatures. Check the pressure of your tyres, including your spare, monthly and before any long journey, preferably when your tyres are cold (not having run for at least 2 hours or having run for less than 2 miles at low speed). If they are not checked in this cold condition, add 4 to 5 PSI (0.3 bar) to the recommended pressure, but never deflate a hot tyre.
http://www.michelin.co.uk/tyres/lear...tyre-care-tips

Put your hand on the tyre sidewall and if you can feel the heat/warmth you know that the tyre is not cold and in this case you can fill couple of points higher than factory recommended. Buy a quality tire pressure gauge and check the pressure the next morning before you start off and you will have the correct col air pressure. If its higher you can bleed if necessary and if its lower fill it up more.

Stick to one place for air, its easier to calibrate against your gauge that way.
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Old 20th November 2012, 10:31   #8
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Default Re: Tyre Safety = Your Safety. How to care for your Tyres

Thanks a lot for the prompt replies guys. This makes a lot of sense, I'll get myself a tyre gauge and check before starting the car and then fill-up or bleed accordingly without considering the tyre temperature at the time to filling (as it will be hot) and finally verify the next time I start the car (cold tyre), what say?

Now I know, this is not a technical question and also you guys may not be from Mumbai (where i reside) but since we are on topic of tyre inflation and self-monitoring, can u please point me to a good place to get the gauge and/or what to look out for while buying one. May be online link if possible.
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Old 6th December 2012, 14:43   #9
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Exclamation Tyre Safety - Myths and Facts

Dear Fellow TBhpians,

Source & Credit : Saudiaramco.com

Quote:
Myth 1 : The leading cause of tyre failure is driving over nails, potholes or other objects on the road.
Fact 1: The leading cause of the tyre failure today is tread separation, which primarily is caused by underinflation of tyres. Low pressure in the tyre causes the tyre to flex more and build up more heat. Excessive heat is a tyre's worst enemy. Other above mentioned abuses also lead to tyre failure however their total percentage is far less than tyre failure due to underinflation.

Myth 2: Its better to release some air from your tyres in summer before extended highway driving to prevent the tyres from overheating.
Fact 2: A properly inflated tyre will not overheat to the point of causing damage or destruction unless driven at speeds beyond the design of the tyre. In fact underinflation can cause failures as discussed in myth 1. It is normal for pressures to increase above recommended 'cold' pressures due to extended driving.

Myth 3: Tread wear presents no safety hazard as long as the wear is even across the tyre width while the fabric or wire is still not exposed.
Fact 3: Tread wear does present a hazard if it exceeds a certain limit, and that limit is reached before fabric or wire is exposed. Tyres with tread less than 1.6 mm (some manufactures say 2 mm) are no longer safe for highway driving.

Myth 4: Tyres in hot countries (like middle east) does not require frequent check for underinflation as compared to the cooler countries (like europe etc) since due to hot weather the air expands and hence pressure is higher.
Fact 4: The high outside temperature rather requires more frequent checking of the tyre pressure since these high temperatures actually increase the rate of pressure loss due to higher natural passage of air through the tyre rubber.

Myth 5: Price should be major consideration while choosing tyres as compared to the type of driving requirements (offroad, highway etc)
Fact 5: The first priority for tyre selection should be choosing tyres suitable for the type of driving done on a routine basis. Choosing wrong tyres can be unsafe and un-economical.

Myth 6: The best place to check air pressure is at your service station
Fact 6: The service station may not be best place to check tyre pressure unless you live within 1 km from it. Air pressure should be checked when tyres are cold (driven less than 1 km) to get accurate readings. Best time to check is before driving in the morning with a personal reliable gauge. Tyres pressure readings with warm/hot tyres may lead to underinflation of tyres.

Myth 7: If you hit a curb or pothole and your tyre does not fail, you can assume that the tyre has sustained no damage.
Fact 7: When a pothole, curb or other object is stuck with sufficient force, a new tyre can be damaged even when correctly inflated. However, the body of a tyre may be damaged with little or no visible exterior condition, and the tyre may run many kms before failing. The best way is to immediatly inspect for cuts, bulges or embedded materials and check it often for slow air leaks which may indicate invisible internal damage that could lead to a tyre failure.

Myth 8: A quick visual check of tyre pressure every day is better than a gauge check once a month
Fact 8: Just "eyeballing" the tyres daily to see if they have enough air is not reliable, especially with the radial tyres. The sidewall bulge which is a characteristic of the radial tyres makes it impossible to visually determine whether tyre are properly inflated or not. Tyre pressure must be checked regularly with a reliable gauge.

Myth 9: Driving on a multi-lane, high speed expressway is easier on tyres that the stop-and-go of the city driving.
Fact 9: High speed expressway driving is harder on tyres. The improvements in highway construction, new multilane systems and high speed expressways mean that vehicle can now be driven at the maximum speed limit for longer period of time. Such operation amplifies tyre problems such as underinflation and damage by the impact with fixed objects. Tyre speed limits should be known to the driver before driving at speeds excess of 120 km/hr and should never exceed the specified speed limits even for short time period.

Myth 10: Proper tyre maintenance requires frequent, expensive tyre rotation and wheel balancing.
Fact 10: Most tyre problems are easy for the average person to avoid or spot. It costs less to inflate your tyres to the proper pressure or purchase of a tyre pressure gauge as compared to the cost of a new tyre. It rather saves money since properly inflated tyres wear slowly as compared to overinflated or underinflated tyres.

Last edited by GTO : 7th December 2012 at 13:28. Reason: Do NOT plagiarise. ALWAYS give due credit to the original source of information
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Old 6th December 2012, 15:37   #10
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Default Re: Tyre Safety - Myths and Facts

My car mannual says for 1-2 pserons 30 psi (F) and 34(R) and for 3-5 passengers 36(F) and 40(R).
How ever everytime we cant estimate the number of passengers, so What I do is maintain in-between pressures. something like 34 in all 4 tires all the time.
What is the ideal way to maintain Tyre pressure in this case?
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Old 6th December 2012, 15:41   #11
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Default Re: Tyre Safety - Myths and Facts

I have observed that the tyre pressure doubles in daytime. Checked it with Nano Cold tyre pressure 30 PSI, tyre pressure after 50 Kms long run on highway at speeds of 80-90 Kmph 50 PSI.
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Old 6th December 2012, 16:31   #12
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Default Re: Tyre Safety - Myths and Facts

Quote:
Originally Posted by jatin22aug View Post
This concludes the list of tyre safety myths. I request fellow team mates to add more in case i have missed them.

Drive safe,
Jatin Dudeja
Adding another point:

Myth: Tyres need to be changed only when they have completed more than a certain mileage (like 40000-50000)
Fact: Tyres lose their flexibility when they are exposed to hot conditions like those in India. So even a tyre that has run for only 20k kms or so need to be changed after 4-5 years or so else they will start losing grip due to their hardness and loss of flexibility. This is characterized by too much jerkiness inside the cabin and the feeling that the suspension is transmitting all the bumps on the road into the cabin even though tyre pressure is maintained correctly.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mercedised View Post
I have observed that the tyre pressure doubles in daytime. Checked it with Nano Cold tyre pressure 30 PSI, tyre pressure after 50 Kms long run on highway at speeds of 80-90 Kmph 50 PSI.
A difference of 20PSI for the same tyre? Either the gauge is wrong or there is something seriously wrong with the rubber. Such a vast difference should not appear. Please check again
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Old 6th December 2012, 16:38   #13
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Default Re: Tyre Safety - Myths and Facts

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Originally Posted by racer_ash View Post
Adding another point:
A difference of 20PSI for the same tyre? Either the gauge is wrong or there is something seriously wrong with the rubber. Such a vast difference should not appear. Please check again
It was around that a difference of +-3 for all the tyres.
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Old 16th December 2012, 11:44   #14
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My car has done about 7k kms since the last rotation, balancing and alignment. The tyres are about 20k kms run. I please advise should just do alignment or should I get rotation and balancing also done?
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Old 16th December 2012, 14:36   #15
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Default Re: Tyre Safety - Myths and Facts

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Originally Posted by mercedised View Post
It was around that a difference of +-3 for all the tyres.
20 Psi difference is nearly impossible IMO. Check with another gauge.
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