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Old 2nd October 2007, 13:44   #1
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Post Which technique for tubeless tyre punctures?

Indian Tyre Companies, Passenger Car Tyres

Hi Guys,

I was going through this, since it is inevitable that I get a puncture sometime. I went and checked out nearby puncturewallahs and most of them follow the Filler Method, and none seem to be aware of the Plug Method.

Anyone in East Delhi aware of some place that does the Plug types?

IMO, they are better than the filler ones. Please suggest?
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Old 2nd October 2007, 14:10   #2
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Its a DIY.

1. Remove the wheel
2. Have the tubeless puncture kit ready
3. Remove the nail using a noseplyer
4. Immediately after (3), insert the sharp-ended threaded tool provided in the kit into the puncture hole to plug it completely. Twist a few turns to even out the hole for the next steps.
5. In the other tool of the kit with an "eye", insert one of the puncture sealant strips half way thru
6. Remove the tool from (4), immediately insert the tool with the puncture strip in (5) into the hole, and pull out the tool while taking care to retain the puncture strip in the hole
7. Cut any jutting out strip from the hole.
8. Refill the air lost.
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Old 2nd October 2007, 14:26   #3
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Thanks for that theMAG, but I have a few questions:

1. Is this technique used from the outside of tyre or inside?
2. Where can I find this kit, and what is its cost?
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Old 2nd October 2007, 14:46   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cutdcrap View Post
Thanks for that theMAG, but I have a few questions:

1. Is this technique used from the outside of tyre or inside?
2. Where can I find this kit, and what is its cost?

1. From the outside of course!
2. Any tyre shop. Cost around Rs. 350
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Old 2nd October 2007, 14:54   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theMAG View Post
Its a DIY.

1. Remove the wheel
2. Have the tubeless puncture kit ready
3. Remove the nail using a noseplyer
4. Immediately after (3), insert the sharp-ended threaded tool provided in the kit into the puncture hole to plug it completely. Twist a few turns to even out the hole for the next steps.
5. In the other tool of the kit with an "eye", insert one of the puncture sealant strips half way thru
6. Remove the tool from (4), immediately insert the tool with the puncture strip in (5) into the hole, and pull out the tool while taking care to retain the puncture strip in the hole
7. Cut any jutting out strip from the hole.
8. Refill the air lost.
A bit confusing mag, have you had to do this on your tyres ?
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Old 2nd October 2007, 15:03   #6
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Originally Posted by esteem_lover View Post
A bit confusing mag, have you had to do this on your tyres ?

Fortunately not on my tyres. But asked the tyre shop to give me a demo on one of their used tyres with a simulated nail puncture. Practised it myself on their tyre before I got the hang of it.

Last edited by theMAG : 2nd October 2007 at 15:06.
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Old 2nd October 2007, 15:09   #7
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Never had a puncture in my tubeless for the last year & more. Thankful for that, hope i don't have to experience one.
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Old 2nd October 2007, 15:30   #8
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The Plug method is practised by very few dealers since it is quite expensive. A Plug costs around rs. 150/- and including labour the total cost of repair can go to around Rs. 200/- or so and that is why the shops do not commonly use it. However, if you specifically ask for it, it can be done.

I know of one shop in South Delhi which can do this for you, let me know if you need the details.

Also, just FYI the filler method works well enough on our roads, have been using it for years without any problems.
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Old 2nd October 2007, 15:37   #9
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Also, just FYI the filler method works well enough on our roads, have been using it for years without any problems.

Yeah, coming to that, Ishan, i think you had used your Michelin XM1s to their max, how many punctures did you have & how did you take care of them ?
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Old 2nd October 2007, 15:45   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theMAG View Post
Its a DIY.

1. Remove the wheel
2. Have the tubeless puncture kit ready
3. Remove the nail using a noseplyer
4. Immediately after (3), insert the sharp-ended threaded tool provided in the kit into the puncture hole to plug it completely. Twist a few turns to even out the hole for the next steps.
5. In the other tool of the kit with an "eye", insert one of the puncture sealant strips half way thru
6. Remove the tool from (4), immediately insert the tool with the puncture strip in (5) into the hole, and pull out the tool while taking care to retain the puncture strip in the hole
7. Cut any jutting out strip from the hole.
8. Refill the air lost.
Thank You , never knew it was that easy ... but are you sure the KIT costs only Rs. 350 /- ???? becuase for removal of a puncture(tubeless tyre) ... the tyre shops charge us anywhere in the range of Rs. - 50-75 /-
And how many times we can use this KIT ?
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Old 2nd October 2007, 21:39   #11
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The Mag is right, tubeless tyre repair is DIY, only problem is that you have to have a compressor to fill air close by, otherwise mahesh has explained perfectly as to how it is to be done. One more thing, it is recommended to fill air above normal pressure in order to identify the puncture point better and to help inserting the gimlet at the right place as an overinflated tyre becomes harder than a soft deflated tyre.

Kit indeed costs 350 bucks.
OT: My previous question sometime back was whether the puncture kit has an effective shelf life, because it is not everyday that we encounter a puncture and having a kit for several months (sometime years) and not being used will have to affect it in some way.

We are charged about 100 rupees for a puncture repair on tubeless tyres whereas the work involved is much less than in case of a tube tyre.
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Old 2nd October 2007, 21:47   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by karan561 View Post
And how many times we can use this KIT ?
It can be used for as long as there are the puncture strips left. Typically a dozen or so.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lukeskywalker View Post

Kit indeed costs 350 bucks.
OT: My previous question sometime back was whether the puncture kit has an effective shelf life, because it is not everyday that we encounter a puncture and having a kit for several months (sometime years) and not being used will have to affect it in some way.
I think you're right in that there will be some obvious hardening of the strips over time of non-usage even though the shop would tell you that it doesnt have an expiry date. The way I figure, a kit should last over the lifetime of 40000 kms for a set of tyres. Under normal usage, punctures are minimal esp in tubeless tyres. And if someone picks up too many punctures during normal driving, they should be driving on a set of caterpillar wheels anyway.

Last edited by theMAG : 2nd October 2007 at 21:48.
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Old 2nd October 2007, 22:23   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iraghava View Post
I know of one shop in South Delhi which can do this for you, let me know if you need the details.
Details please? Thanks in advance.
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Old 3rd October 2007, 21:15   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theMAG View Post
It can be used for as long as there are the puncture strips left. Typically a dozen or so.
Thats not bad at all , if we calculate then it would be like for 12 punctures we pay about Rs 900 /- (considering we pay Rs 75/- for each of them) & the kit costs Rs 350/- , so overall we are saving Rs 550/- , not bad at all.(that is if we think long term)
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Old 4th October 2007, 01:39   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by esteem_lover View Post
Yeah, coming to that, Ishan, i think you had used your Michelin XM1s to their max, how many punctures did you have & how did you take care of them ?
John - For the first 35-40,000 kms there were hardly any punctures, maybe 1 or 2 not sure. After 40,000 when the tyres had entered their twilight zone, I did get a couple of punctures but they were always slow punctures which could be prolonged by filling air into the tyres.

All in all a very satisfactory experience with the tyres.

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Originally Posted by nkapoor777 View Post
Details please? Thanks in advance.
Contact The Tyre Plaza, Lajpat Nagar. Ph: 29810203 Mr. Anoop, you can use my reference if you like.
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