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Old 8th May 2006, 13:06   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ivor
Sounds like a deal! Plus, the kit here didn't have rubber cement.

Incidentally, unless you know how to repair a tubeless tyre, I wouldn't recommend that you try this kit yourself. I am keeping the kit because often the small tyre repair chaps in Bombay don't have it--they know how to repair the tubeless tyre but can't afford this kit or don't want to keep one because most folks in India use tube type tyres.
I totally agree with you Ivor. I keep them for the same reason. May be once after seeing how its done, I would give it a try, hope that day doesnt come. I dont want punctures in my tyre every day.
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Old 25th January 2007, 13:01   #32
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Had my first puncture on my tubless tyres (after 4 months and 8000 kms). During my daily routine inspection of the tyres, found a small 1 inch nail neatly embedded in my rear right wheel. No drop in tyre pressure was detectable. Drove straight to the tyre shop without removing the nail, got the puncture fixed in 10 mts (cost Rs. 50). The puncture was fixed by removing the nail without deflating the tyre and inserting a plug into the puncture.

There are two lessons I learnt, with respect to avoiding punctures. Apart from regular tyre pressure checks, make sure that you inspect your tyres frequently, preferably first thing in the morning every day; also whenever you take out your car it does no harm to quickly check your tyres. I will be driving to Mumbai this evening and it sure feels good to catch the puncture first thing in the morning in the city rather than somewhere on the Expressway at 9-00 PM.

Second point I learnt is that one should drive as far as possible in the centre of the road, especially when road repairs are going on. Roads are dug up everywhere in my area (the morons are unnecessarily creating a separate lane for buses) and the sides of the roads are filled with all kinds of junk. Yesterday I was in too much of a hurry and went to the right edge of the road right next to the repair area. This morning I found out the price to be paid for such needless hurry.
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Old 25th January 2007, 14:54   #33
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Look at the bolt, about 5mm width, which went almost upto the rim
http://www.team-bhp.com/forum/tyre-a...tml#post360170 (Potenza G3 Review - With Final update....)

The tyre was not leaking air at all. Apart from that it also had an inch long nail!
So I guess if you don't take out nails they plug the puncture pretty good
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Old 25th January 2007, 16:10   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tsk1979 View Post
Look at the bolt, about 5mm width, which went almost upto the rim
http://www.team-bhp.com/forum/tyre-a...tml#post360170 (Potenza G3 Review - With Final update....)

The tyre was not leaking air at all. Apart from that it also had an inch long nail!
So I guess if you don't take out nails they plug the puncture pretty good
That is the advantage of tubeless tyres. You can drive around for a while (at reasonably slow speeds) with objects embedded in your tyre and it is nice to be able to drive to a tyre shop and fix the problem before getting a flat. It is still advisable to fix the puncture quickly because these objects might do further damage to your tyre as you drive at high speeds and also hit potholes. Plus the leak might start/worsen if the embedded objects loosen up due to further damage to the tyre.
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Old 15th March 2007, 15:58   #35
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Unfortunately, caught another screw in my right rear tyre during my routine morning inspection. Here is what I saw:






Again, drove straight to my tyre shop and got it fixed. Turned out to be 2" long screw. Second puncture at 11000 kms. Unfortunately the recent road repairs in my area are taking a heavy toll on my tyres. Again, very important to inspect your tyres to catch these punctures before they can hurt you. Driving to Mumbai tomorrow, so glad this is out of the way.

Last edited by rks : 15th March 2007 at 16:06.
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Old 19th April 2007, 13:30   #36
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Default Failure of previous puncture

I found the front right tyre pressure was coming down substantially every week, by more than 10 psi. This happened two weeks in a row -- the first time I just filled up again, because I had given the car for service and I thought they might have tampered with the tyre pressure. But it happened again yesterday. I took the car to my tyre shop and initially the junior tyre mechanic said there was no puncture or leakage. I insisted that there was air leakage and asked the guy to check whether the previous puncture area was leaking again. He could not even find the previous puncture. The senior mechanic took over on my insistence, and the previous puncture area was identified and found to be leaking *very* slowly. He simply inserted another stick into the area as shown below:

ImageShack - Hosting :: puncturefailurern8.jpg


Unitread tyres (East Street, Pune) did not charge me for this repair; nice of them for taking responsibility for the failure.

Why did the previous pucnture repair fail? I think after shifting to 5" alloys from 4" steel wheels, the puncture repair area might have been stretched out, making it more vulnerable to failure. Now the same repair has been done again with the alloy wheel in place; hopefully I will not see another failure. The tyre shop guys also scrubbed the tyres, including the puncture area, when I shifted to alloys -- don't know if this had any bad effect.
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Old 19th April 2007, 17:18   #37
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Any idea how long the puncture kit can be stored, cos it is not like every day that we have a puncture. I bought a puncture kit about a year ago and have used it only once. Will storage affect the efficacy of the sealant? I don't see any " best before" date on it.
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Old 15th June 2007, 12:16   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lukeskywalker View Post
Any idea how long the puncture kit can be stored, cos it is not like every day that we have a puncture. I bought a puncture kit about a year ago and have used it only once. Will storage affect the efficacy of the sealant? I don't see any " best before" date on it.

In addition to that same question, while reviving an old thread, my query is abt the efficacy of the puncture plugs over a long duration. Kinda urgent query, due to my upcoming drive to Mangalore.

Will these plugs/internal patches render the tyre to its earlier performance levels or should one be careful while using repaired tubeless tyres?
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Old 18th August 2007, 20:47   #39
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Default Tubeless puncture kit

Where can i get a good puncture kit for tubeless tyres in Chennai and how much does it cost?
Cheers

Last edited by Zappo : 18th August 2007 at 23:39. Reason: Always search and use an existing thread. Threads merged.
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Old 17th September 2007, 20:19   #40
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Surprising, but I had a puncture in my JK Vectra tubeless tyre and it leaked almost immediately, I felt the car pulling to the right, stopped it and saw the front right tyre almost flat, had to drive almost 1 km to change it but by that time it was completely flat. it also had some rubber powder (in fact lots of it inside the tyre, which the guy said was because I drove it for 1 km after puncture), the puncture was not too big, almost 1-1.5 mm dia.

Planning to get it checked this weekend to verify if it's ok for use (Because of the rubber powder).
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Old 17th September 2007, 20:31   #41
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Quite unlike Tubeless to die flat unless the Puncture was big,which is not in your case.

Till now I have had only One puncture in 25,000 Km 2 years on the Lancer Potenza G3- Although I generally stick to the center of the road( Sometimes the Medians have nails screws hidden in the accumalated dust) and air preassure check every 2 weeks.
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Old 17th September 2007, 20:34   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theMAG View Post
In addition to that same question, while reviving an old thread, my query is abt the efficacy of the puncture plugs over a long duration. Kinda urgent query, due to my upcoming drive to Mangalore.

Will these plugs/internal patches render the tyre to its earlier performance levels or should one be careful while using repaired tubeless tyres?
I remember reading somewhere that after repair of tubeless tyres with patches, one must not exceed 80 kmph for the next 12 hours or so (or maybe for some specific distance); further, one must *never* exceed 120 kmph with that tyre. But I think this applies only when some tear is repaired with a patch. For punctures, one probably has to be careful for some time after the repair, and after that one can drive as usual. At least I have not reduced my speeds despite having a plug in two of my tyres.

I did have a slow leakage of a previously repaired puncture (with a plug). I can think of two possible reasons. When shifting to alloys, the tyre mechanic scrubbed the tyres and removed all external evidence of the plug (to such an extent that one could not figure out where the puncture was). Secondly the alloys were wider than the previous stock rims and this might have stretched out the puncture area, causing slow leakage.
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Old 24th October 2007, 22:23   #43
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Is it also recommended to carry a spare tube - to manage in the event of a puncture & you are in a place where tubeless tire repairs are not available ? Also are spare tubes available for tubeless tire sizes (205/60 R16) ?
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Old 26th October 2007, 22:41   #44
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Hi there !
I have been using tubeless tires for the past 10years now.
IMHO, i state an example here:

Lets say you have the punchure kit with you. Take two puchured tires, fix one with the punchure repair kit and the other with the 'OMNI' patch inside the tire. Now what happens is when you pierce the tyre with the tool that is supplied in the kit it will break thru(but obviously damage) the steel wires inside the tire plus the sticky punture substance when inserted will imbalance the tire and makes an obnoxious noise while driving. On the other hand the 'OMNI' patch is pasted inside the tire which neither damages the steel strands nor it weighs as much as the sticky substance weighs, plus its cheap too. The difference can be seen when you balance the two tires on the balancing wheel.
Bottom line i suggest the 'OMNI' patch.
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Old 19th December 2007, 09:05   #45
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Here is the image of the tubeless tyre puncture repair kit. I got it for Rs 225 /- at JC Road, Bangalore.



The instructions at the back say:

1. Mark the damaged portion of the tire and pull out the nail
2. Use #1 exclusive tool and insert into the tire following the direction of the slit
3. Use promate cold-mending rubber strip and pierce 1/2 into #2 exclusive tool insert handle
4. Use promate cold-mending rubber strip and pierce 2/3 of it thru the tire. After this, use hand to press the cold mending rubber strip and pull out the tool
5. Cut the remaining mending rubber strip 5mm from the outside of tire

---
I am not clear with step #4 above. If we pull out the tool, won't the rubber strip also come out along with the tool? Can some one clarify
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