Go Back   Team-BHP > BHP India > Vintage Cars & Classics in India


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 3rd March 2010, 11:20   #2881
BHPian
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Mumbai
Posts: 328
Thanked: 178 Times
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by PAVAN KADAM View Post
That contact was given to Spitfire by me Good to know, somehow those parts were got off from that hospital store.

If i'am not wrong, its Dr Manisha Godbole and Mr Ramanath who were caretakers for those spares.

Many were not apt for a Baywindow.
Yes Dr. Kadam you are bang on. Most of the parts belonged to Split Van and not much use for a Baywindow. Nevertheless they are nice to have's and don't mind storing them till I find a "Split Van".
67Bug is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 3rd March 2010, 11:26   #2882
Senior - BHPian
 
Spitfire's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Panaji - Goa/Bangalore - Karnataka
Posts: 3,240
Thanked: 603 Times
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by 67Bug View Post
THANKS TO SPITFIRE
Quote:
Originally Posted by PAVAN KADAM View Post
That contact was given to Spitfire by me
Oh good to know the parts landed in the group.

Yes and the thanks goes to Pavan Sir. This was like 2 years back i guess. How time flies.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 67Bug View Post
Most of the parts belonged to Split Van and not much use for a Baywindow.
Yes same here. By the time I got around to know the parts list my split was on a truck to somewhere I didnt know about :(
Spitfire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 3rd March 2010, 12:58   #2883
Distinguished - BHPian
 
harit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Mumbai
Posts: 3,944
Thanked: 2,682 Times
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by 67Bug View Post
Yes ............... Nevertheless they are nice to have's and don't mind storing them till I find a "Split Van".
No you are not stupid. I have removed that icon!! On the contrary, you are quite smart. I have also collected lots of parts for cars which I have aquired much later, and have still not aquired. Decorative parts like Minerva headlights can always be used for decorative purposes, others can be give to those who require these parts.
But be careful. Storing parts which have rubber or diaphragms (now who thought of this spelling?) like fuel pumps can be tricky as they age and become useless. Also, storage should be sorted well, often the part cannot be found when required.
So now I know where to ask for Split parts. But hurry, Splits are also rising in pricing. Many have gone out of the country.
Oh no, not again rising prices.

Cheers harit
harit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 3rd March 2010, 18:02   #2884
BHPian
 
TuffRyder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Bangalore
Posts: 494
Thanked: 26 Times
Default

Harit: I am not sure if this is the right thread to ask this question. What is the best method to store rubber parts? For one I know is to keep it away from sunlight. Many suggested to coat them with oil but Im not sure if the synthetic products in the oils will react with the rubber.
TuffRyder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 3rd March 2010, 21:23   #2885
Ram
Senior - BHPian
 
Ram's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Singapore, Mumbai, Nagpur
Posts: 2,164
Thanked: 142 Times
Default On the preservation of rubber parts (new or vintage)

Quote:
Originally Posted by TuffRyder View Post
What is the best method to store rubber parts? For one I know is to keep it away from sunlight. Many suggested to coat them with oil but Im not sure if the synthetic products in the oils will react with the rubber.
Oil is a very bad substance to bring in contact with rubber. It will surely deteriorate the rubber. My first option is the oldest rubber-preservative on earth -- Earth's softest mineral -- Talc !!!

Heat and sunlight are bad for rubber.
Even plain electric light from a tungsten bulb can spoil vintage rubber.
And of course, Ozone is very bad for rubber.

Protect rubber from sunlight and ozone; covered up in plastic garbage bags in a dark, dry cupboard, liberally coated with Talcum powder, glycerine or silicone grease.

Another option is silicone spray "Armorall" protectant.

Name:  Armorall.jpg
Views: 1770
Size:  46.7 KB

A 1993 Saab 9-3 manual says, "to preserve the rubber seals around doors, windwows, etc., wipe them down with glycerol (aka glycerine)."

You can use 303 Aerospace Protectant.

303 Aerospace Protectant preserves rubber tires, neoprene, latex, door and trunk seals, weather-stripping, EPDM rubber roofing (EPDM is ethylene propylene diene Monomer (M-class) rubber, CV boots;
Vinyl convertible tops (and clear vinyl windows), rexine tire covers (for SUVs), etc.

Find info about it here:
303 Products - Aerospace Protectant, High Tech Fabric Guard - World's Leading Automotive Care Products

When you want to preserve rubber gaskets, clean them very well, and then coat them with silicone grease. It shields them from the ozone in the air, which is the main culprit. Of course, remember that silicone grease can eat your paintjob.

Castle Brake Life is a brake lubricant with a 100% silicone formula. It is water and salt resistant and has outstanding adhesion to all metal parts and withstands heat up to 750F. Use on rubber parts, and also on all moving brake parts. Can also can be used as a dielectric grease on spark plug boots as well as other electronic connections.

Hope this was illuminating !!!
Cheers...
Ram
Ram is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 3rd March 2010, 22:36   #2886
Distinguished - BHPian
 
Stanher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Hyderabad, AP
Posts: 6,319
Thanked: 1,529 Times
Default

Thanks ram, very useful indeed. 'hope I can find these products locally. Aromorall seems to be available only in bigger cities (Del, B'bay, B'lore etc.) I really loved the tyre spray they have!

I've also read that WD-40 is capable of preserving rubber as well?
Stanher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th March 2010, 00:33   #2887
Ram
Senior - BHPian
 
Ram's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Singapore, Mumbai, Nagpur
Posts: 2,164
Thanked: 142 Times
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stanher View Post
I've also read that WD-40 is capable of preserving rubber as well?
Stanher: WD-40 is a petroleum-based product. It damages polycarbonate and clear polystyrene plastic. It will wear down and dry out the rubber.

Better use silicone-liquid or silicone-grease on rubber or plastic.
Ram is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th March 2010, 15:07   #2888
BHPian
 
TuffRyder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Bangalore
Posts: 494
Thanked: 26 Times
Default

Thanks Ram, that indeed was very very useful information. I think the most economical way for me would be talc and airtight black garbage bags.
TuffRyder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th March 2010, 16:18   #2889
Senior - BHPian
 
manishalive's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Bangalore
Posts: 2,415
Thanked: 671 Times
Default

yes Talc is the correct way. Though one would think when the seals are in touch with oil while working why not coat them with oil. Well the oil oxidises and that's bad.

I recetly purchased brake rubber kit for my Fiat came nicely coated in talc.
manishalive is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 4th March 2010, 22:31   #2890
Distinguished - BHPian
 
Stanher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Hyderabad, AP
Posts: 6,319
Thanked: 1,529 Times
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by manishalive View Post
yes Talc is the correct way. Though one would think when the seals are in touch with oil while working why not coat them with oil. Well the oil oxidises and that's bad.

I recetly purchased brake rubber kit for my Fiat came nicely coated in talc.
By talc you mean talcum powder??
Stanher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th March 2010, 23:04   #2891
Distinguished - BHPian
 
anjan_c2007's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: India
Posts: 5,498
Thanked: 4,558 Times
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ram View Post

Another option is silicone spray "Armorall" protectant.
When you want to preserve rubber gaskets, clean them very well, and then coat them with silicone grease. It shields them from the ozone in the air, which is the main culprit. Of course, remember that silicone grease can eat your paintjob.
Hope this was illuminating !!!
Cheers...
Ram
Valuable information. In fact Ram the Maruti 800 Workshop Manual says that the rubber bushings on the leaf springs need to be lubricated with silicone grease/gel. But way back when I read this manual in 1991, the shopkeepers blankly stared at me when I asked them for something like that.
anjan_c2007 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 5th March 2010, 09:35   #2892
Ram
Senior - BHPian
 
Ram's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Singapore, Mumbai, Nagpur
Posts: 2,164
Thanked: 142 Times
Default Talc is a Super Soft Rock

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stanher View Post
By talc you mean talcum powder??
Talc is a naturally occurring mineral.
hydrated magnesium silicate.


It is very soft (Mohs index = 1) You can scratch natural Talc rock with your fingernail. By way of comparison: Aluminum has a Mohs of 2.5, Steel=4 to 4.5, the enamel on our teeth (if healthy) has a Mohs of 5, Glass=6, Tungsten used in Grenade Shrapnel has a Mohs of 8, and Diamond=10.

A metamorphic rock which is mostly made of Talc is Soapstone.
Soapstone is occasionally thrown up by the Narmada River.
You must have seen the soapstone idols, ashtrays and jewelry boxes available at Marble Rocks, Jabalpur.

Talc is typically powdered, perfumed and sold as talcum powder.(Imagine you're really dusting your face with powdered stone!).

Of course, haven't we all seen, inner tubes of tubed tyres which are well dusted with Talc. It lubricates them for fitment and preserves the rubber.

Ram
Ram is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 5th March 2010, 17:11   #2893
Senior - BHPian
 
manishalive's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Bangalore
Posts: 2,415
Thanked: 671 Times
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ram View Post
Talc is a naturally occurring mineral.
hydrated magnesium silicate.


It is very soft (Mohs index = 1) You can scratch natural Talc rock with your fingernail. By way of comparison: Aluminum has a Mohs of 2.5, Steel=4 to 4.5, the enamel on our teeth (if healthy) has a Mohs of 5, Glass=6, Tungsten used in Grenade Shrapnel has a Mohs of 8, and Diamond=10.

A metamorphic rock which is mostly made of Talc is Soapstone.
Soapstone is occasionally thrown up by the Narmada River.
You must have seen the soapstone idols, ashtrays and jewelry boxes available at Marble Rocks, Jabalpur.

Talc is typically powdered, perfumed and sold as talcum powder.(Imagine you're really dusting your face with powdered stone!).

Of course, haven't we all seen, inner tubes of tubed tyres which are well dusted with Talc. It lubricates them for fitment and preserves the rubber.

Ram
Spot on bro . The said talc can be had from any tyre repair shop or supply store.
manishalive is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 5th March 2010, 18:31   #2894
Distinguished - BHPian
 
Stanher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Hyderabad, AP
Posts: 6,319
Thanked: 1,529 Times
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by manishalive View Post
Spot on bro . The said talc can be had from any tyre repair shop or supply store.
You mean that white powder they sprinkle on the insides of tyres before fitting the tubes in?
Stanher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 5th March 2010, 21:17   #2895
Senior - BHPian
 
manishalive's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Bangalore
Posts: 2,415
Thanked: 671 Times
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stanher View Post
You mean that white powder they sprinkle on the insides of tyres before fitting the tubes in?
Yep, infact in many application seals are dusted with talc to aid assembly.


The best liquid treatments (3M Rubber Dressing, Wurths, glycerene) are great for active use scenarios (exposure in daily / weekly driving in bad weather & sun exposure). Talc is great for periods of storage where there is minimal environmental exposure. Note that a lot of rubber parts are dusted with talc prior to packaging.
manishalive is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Fuel-tank Rust Removal (by Electrolysis) & Rust Proofing H3LIOS Motorbikes 30 19th May 2014 14:26
Jeep Rusting and disintegrating: drmessiah 4x4 Vehicles 21 22nd June 2011 21:15
Rust Control for Classic cars?? wilkie366 Vintage Cars & Classics in India 13 31st December 2010 15:31
A tribute to a Vintage Man : similar to a vintage car or vintage wine StarVegabond Shifting gears 3 12th October 2009 14:49


All times are GMT +5.5. The time now is 22:41.

Copyright 2000 - 2017, Team-BHP.com
Proudly powered by E2E Networks