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Old 27th December 2008, 22:44   #31
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i find it a bit strange, and surprised - that after you guys go to the ends of the earth to find original parts for your old beauties, for the engine , you end up using such jugaad
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Old 10th January 2009, 19:37   #32
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Two references of lead substitutes from The Automobile, UK, Nov and Dec 1999 issues.
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Unleaded Petrol in Vintage and Classic Cars?-sonycamv-2187.jpg
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Old 3rd March 2011, 20:21   #33
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Again reviving this thread for more debate on this important matter:
Unleaded Petrol in Vintage and Classic Cars?-scan0034.jpg
Source:The Automobile,UK, Dec 1999

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Old 26th October 2011, 20:57   #34
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Default Re: Unleaded Petrol in Vintage and Classic Cars?

A bit off-topic but some useful information about petrol tanks and the fuel therein stored for a long period of time in our old beauties:
Article (extract) by Bob Milton in Quality First (MCOC, UK) Journal October 2011
[quote]
Oxford Troubles
Firstly, the engine developed a habit of "petering out"for no obvious reason when I got it home (usually by tow). I would make the usual checks...points... fuel pump....carburettor etc. but could find no obvious fault.Whereupon I restart the engine and it runs fine until the next time it decides to fail. Pondering on this, a thought struck me.The fuel gauge had never worked and consequently I keep the fuel tank well topped up.It occurred to me that, with low mileage petrol usage, the majority of fuel in the tank might be at least 10 years old, probably a bit suspect. Anyway, I eventually took the bull by the horns and drained the tank completely. This allowed a status check on the suction line tank filter. This turned out to be somewhat "mucky" so that was duly cleaned. Following the line backwards I also discovered that the fuel pump filter was also in need of the same treatment. Whilst there, the pump contact points were also checked....O.K. Now I thought, lets get the fuel sender unit out and have a look. Sure enough it was totally seized up, but with some gentle persuasion and some WD 40 it was soon in working order. The upshot of this was that now, the gauge works well- and with fresh 4 gallons of petrol the engine runs fine again.[unquote]
Editor Derek Andrews note:
[quote]
It is useful to note that the fuel will deteriorate over time.Recommendations seem to be in the order of 3 to 4 weeks. This can be noticed by (1) smell (2) engine performance (3) fuel colour. Advice tells us that over that period there is a loss of fuel components such as butane.. which leaves the fuel less volatile. Consequently,a greater percentage deposit of carbon can occur on spark plugs and in the cylinder "firing space." However these things can be negated if fresh fuel is added on a regular basis, thus "freshening up" the fuel tank. Another idea is to go on a long run every so often in order to use up older fuel. A week end tour might be just the ticket, for more than one reason. So basically if your car has been stored for a long time then it is a good idea to replace the old fuel (disposing of it in a responsible manner of course).On a safety point of view though "sniffing" fuel is not to be overly indulged in for obvious reasons.[unquote]

Last edited by anjan_c2007 : 26th October 2011 at 21:01.
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Old 26th October 2011, 23:13   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anjan_c2007
A bit off-topic but some useful information about petrol tanks and the fuel therein stored for a long period of time in our old beauties:
Article (extract) by Bob Milton in Quality First (MCOC, UK) Journal October 2011
Just use 100 ml 2 t with every five litres works well
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Old 26th October 2011, 23:35   #36
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Default Re: Unleaded Petrol in Vintage and Classic Cars?

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Originally Posted by kasli View Post
Just use 100 ml 2 t with every five litres works well
That is too much; better to use lesser. Because 20 ml per liter was the recommended 2T oil required for Vijay and Lamby scooters for lubrication.

Other than a preservative as mentioned, there used to be an oil termed Upper Cylinder Oil during the days of the good old Ambys and Fiats. Used immediately after engine overhauls to have a lubricating effect on valves and valve seating on the cylinder head.
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Old 26th October 2011, 23:50   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rajeev k
That is too much; better to use lesser. Because 20 ml per liter was the recommended 2T oil required for Vijay and Lamby scooters for lubrication.

Other than a preservative as mentioned, there used to be an oil termed Upper Cylinder Oil during the days of the good old Ambys and Fiats. Used immediately after engine overhauls to have a lubricating effect on valves and valve seating on the cylinder head.
My reference is to a car. I don't know he scooter and back bit. It's working for all my American cars , German cars etc
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Old 27th October 2011, 06:32   #38
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Default Re: Unleaded Petrol in Vintage and Classic Cars?

Quote:
It is useful to note that the fuel will deteriorate over time.Recommendations seem to be in the order of 3 to 4 weeks. ... Another idea is to go on a long run every so often in order to use up older fuel. ..So basically if your car has been stored for a long time then it is a good idea to replace the old fuel (disposing of it in a responsible manner of course)
Very very true - If storing vehicles, it is good to leave a little fuel in the tank say around 2 to 5 litres - This will force one to tank up before the drive and help clean the system.

I've personally faced this issue some years back!
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