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Old 5th July 2009, 21:35   #1
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Default Monsoon Do's and Dont's For Your Old Car

Monsoon is the season that I believe causes the maximum attacks on all vulnerable areas of our old cars.The excessive moisture all around (would sing "Moisture is all around" and not the 1980's hit pop song "Love is all around" ) and the sky sourced waters (rains) these are all very damaging for the car's bodyline, mechanicals and electricals.
I prefer to use my Landmaster very rarely during this season. Only a fortnightly trip for air checks and sometimes pleasure drives when its sunny are preferred. Today I sprayed diesel on the car's underbody, engine bay, leaf springs to prevent moisture attacks. I have been doing this since ages.One must totally avoid the brake portions (wheel discs), rubber parts including bushings and electricals while such sprays are done.
Using diesel (75 %) and used engine oil (20 W-40 W)(25%), a rust fighting cocktail is prepared by me and applied with a paint brush on the chrome wheel covers and other exposed chrome plated parts on the exteriors.We must keep off the cocktail thereafter,especially when we wear decent dresses as it soils and oils anything that comes in contact.Even gear oil (90W) can be applied with diesel (90% diesel and 10% used gear oil) in places where the monsoon is more severe.
But this cocktail attracts dirt and grime and needs to be periodically washed off using fresh diesel. Reapplication of the rust fighting cocktail thereafter to last two more weeks is done. Every two weeks the cocktail must be washed off with fresh diesel.Even on the wheel rims I apply this cocktail. It shoos away any moisture and water.
Caution: The cocktail must be applied only to dry surfaces and not wet ones.
I would love hearing about more such ingenious recipes from fellow members!
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Old 5th July 2009, 22:02   #2
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@ Anjan,
Very much nice write up, for those who owns those vintage classics & also for vintage car enthusiast like us.
Your very deep knowledge about these vintage classics that you shares with us is really amazing & much helpful to all of us.
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Old 6th July 2009, 00:52   #3
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thanks anjan, for the tip. never knew this, is it applicable for the newer cars??
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Old 6th July 2009, 01:02   #4
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The most important DO NOT has been left out. Do not put a cover over your car, specially if there is humidity like in Mumbai. The rot will set in deeper than you can ever reach to remove.

Cheers harit
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Old 6th July 2009, 09:20   #5
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I use oil on the chrome parts for my amby and landy. Never tried the diesel cocktail. Will do it asap!

As Harit sir has said, covering the car is a strict No No. try to get a covered shed to park the car. that would be ideal.
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Old 6th July 2009, 12:28   #6
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What about the most basic rule of owning an old car + the monsoons : Dry indoor parking! Though not a very old car, my Jeep is incredibly susceptible to rust. She's been parked outdoors for the last 10 years.

However, my Jeep recently made her way into the building garage

Monsoon Do's and Dont's For Your Old Car-dsc00387.jpg

I'd say indoor parking is the single most important consideration, keeping in mind the quality of our rain water + Bombay weather conditions.

Quote:
Do not put a cover over your car, specially if there is humidity like in Mumbai.
Great tip. Mistakenly did that once and found a lot more rust than would have been without the cover.

Another tip : Get a good wash & clean dry, after a wet drive.
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Old 6th July 2009, 13:30   #7
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Default Diesel wash.

A garage owner I know, has a 1960 Fiat 1100. He regularly gives what he calls a "diesel wash". He sprays the body with diesel with a compressor. That way the oil gets into the deepest crevices and corners, which are difficult to reach and clean or dry, and also are otherwise ideal places for moisture to harbour.
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Old 6th July 2009, 14:45   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GTO
Dry indoor parking!
Best option, but unfortunately not available to all. I've got two Enfield cafe's parked in my building. The new Grey cafe has already started rusting badly because its getting wet in the rains and I am not a fan of the gold anti-rust solutions. But I'm being compelled to use it on the Grey cafe because weirdly a lot of parts are rusting very quickly. My own chrome Machismo hasn't seen anything like the Grey one is experiencing.

I've covered it now, and the rust process has slowed down a lot. Will use the white rust-removal powder to remove all the rust. Moreover, I've used bearings for the rearset controls and rust has appeared on them too. I've heard grease is the worst option for such bearings, because it can thin the oil inside the bearing. I think its the same for the gold anti-rust liquid. What option do I have?! (attached a pic, its quite dark but you get the picture)

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Quote:
Originally Posted by GTO
Another tip : Get a good wash & clean dry, after a wet drive.
I echo this. It really increases the life of your paint, chrome and other parts. If neglected, the muck would just stiffen around the parts causing problems.

Last edited by Gordon : 6th July 2009 at 14:47.
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Old 6th July 2009, 20:20   #9
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Wurth has some great sprays to protect chrome and vulnerable areas like wheel rims etc. I am going to try them this weekend will list some of the stuff I use.
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Old 6th July 2009, 21:23   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dhrishikesh View Post
@ Anjan,
Very much nice write up, for those who owns those vintage classics & also for vintage car enthusiast like us.
Your very deep knowledge about these vintage classics that you shares with us is really amazing & much helpful to all of us.
Thanks dhrishikesh

Quote:
Originally Posted by amit V8 View Post
thanks anjan, for the tip. never knew this, is it applicable for the newer cars??
Amit thats OK for newer cars too, but the rubber and plastic parts (including black bumpers which diesel instantly fades) and electricals/electronic circuitry needs to be kept strictly off the diesel and the oily cocktail.
It will take time, but also clean the tie rod ends, coil springs /McPherson Struts washing off the dirt and grime. Apply the cocktail on the metal (BEWARE OF ANY APPLICATION ON THE RUBBER BUSHINGS) springs,tie rod ends after the washed parts have dried. You'll surely feel the difference when you drive. The car is much more responsive with better acting suspensions.Be careful so that the cocktail or diesel does not touch the disc brakes or the calipers and wheel drums of the car. It severely affects braking. A 2 inch paint brush is ideal for specific application like these and no spray should be used, as droplets can come in contact with the rubber parts and the braking system.
Again after dirt and grime have stuck over the metal say after some days of use diesel wash these and reapply the cocktail.
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Old 6th July 2009, 22:04   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gordon View Post
I've covered it now, and the rust process has slowed down a lot. Will use the white rust-removal powder to remove all the rust. Moreover, I've used bearings for the rearset controls and rust has appeared on them too. I've heard grease is the worst option for such bearings, because it can thin the oil inside the bearing. I think its the same for the gold anti-rust liquid. What option do I have?! (attached a pic, its quite dark but you get the picture)

Attachment 155131

.
Hey, what is this white rust-removal powder ? .
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Old 6th July 2009, 22:30   #12
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Could you provide the complete name of the product? Will be better while searching for it in the market.
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Old 6th July 2009, 23:09   #13
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Hey Gordon you mentioned the powder, so I'm asking you what this is and where it could be available !
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Old 6th July 2009, 23:54   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperSelect
Hey Gordon you mentioned the powder, so I'm asking you what this is and where it could be available !
Oh just go to a local accessory shop and ask them for rust-removal powder. Its white in color. Its very simple to use and remove. Remember use a soft material while using it. Minor rusts can easily be removed.

I don't remember the name, but have the bottle. Its in the bike's toolbox. Will take a pic and upload tomorrow.

Some petrol pump stations provide services like washing, regular service/maintainence, oil sprays on engine and underbody, etc. They do a pretty good job. Had done one for the Swift recently - full body wash, interior vacuuming, washing mats, new oil spray on engine and underbody, a complete check and tweaking of brakes/power-steering/oil/coolant/etc. And it cost us just around Rs 550.

Cost of oil, coolant, etc is exclusive.
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Old 7th July 2009, 00:22   #15
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Thanks Gordon, I'll need some of this soon.
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