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Old 25th May 2020, 05:36   #586
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Default Re: My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Sp

Ah! I had not understood at all. female need mails and males need femails . (Dyslexia Rules, KO!)

Yes, I see how it all fits together now. Very nicely done.
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Old 27th May 2020, 09:59   #587
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Originally Posted by Jeroen View Post
Adjusting the parking brake is simple. You turn the adjuster so that the parking brake shoes are full on, so you canít turn the hub/disc anymore. Then, you carefully start slacking it, so the hub/disc can be turned without the shoes touching.

Simple, effective.
Should the parking brake be engaged when you do this adjustment? If yes, then to how many clicks should the hand brake lever be pulled up?


The EBC Greenstuff are Stage 1 upgrade from the OEM pads. The EBC redstuff are Stage 2 upgrade


It is recommended that the front and the rear brake pads/disc combo be of the same material so that the co-efficient of friction is uniform at front and back. Else, it might result in tail sliding during hard braking. If the front brake pads are at their end of life then please change them to EBC greenstuff as well.
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Old 27th May 2020, 11:57   #588
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Originally Posted by sagarpadaki View Post
Should the parking brake be engaged when you do this adjustment? If yes, then to how many clicks should the hand brake lever be pulled up?
No, you leave the parking brake disengaged when adjusting the brake shoe. You need to first adjust the brake shoe and next check how much slack the hand brake has, i.e. how many clicks. The workshop manual stipulates 3-5 clicks.

I was talking to my friend Raymond, the Jaguar X308 specialist. I have shared some of the technical workshops earlier on in this thread. He supplied the parts for this job. He told me they never touch the brake shoe adjustment at all when replacing the disc/drum assembly. I followed the official Jaguar instruction step by step as it was the first time i did this on my Jaguar. Better safe than sorry.

But it is not necessary at all. As this is only the parking brake, there is virtually no wear on the inside of the drum. So the whole disc/drum assembly comes off without slackening up the park brake shoe adjuster.

Raymond told me he checks the handbrake before he takes the disc/drum of to see if there is more than 5 clicks play. If not, he will just put the new disc/drum back on without ever touching the adjuster. Any undue play over 5 clicks is rare and if there is a little he takes it out by adjusting the park brake cable. Which is a lot quicker. Live and learn.

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Originally Posted by sagarpadaki View Post
The EBC Greenstuff are Stage 1 upgrade from the OEM pads. The EBC redstuff are Stage 2 upgrade
Thanks

Quote:
Originally Posted by sagarpadaki View Post
It is recommended that the front and the rear brake pads/disc combo be of the same material so that the co-efficient of friction is uniform at front and back. Else, it might result in tail sliding during hard braking. If the front brake pads are at their end of life then please change them to EBC greenstuff as well.
Yes, I am aware of this recommendation, but I think it is very theoretic. What it doesnít take into consideration is that on nearly all cars, certainly on my Jaguar, the front brakes are much more powerful than the rear ones to start with for this very reason. A bit of difference in friction coefficient is not going to make a material difference. And then this car comes with ABS, ESP and every other imaginable abbreviation that keeps it straight under all sorts of conditions.

Obviously, changing right and left (irrespective of wear) does make sense.
Mind you, in practice you would be hard pressed to notice a difference if one of the rear brakes was working less than the other one.

Even less so, if you have a set up with drum brakes at the rear and discs at the front. Such as we had on Cees his Dacia I showed earlier. He drove around with the left rear brake completely blocked off and could not even notice the difference when braking hard. Now that might be different when the road gets slippery, so I would not recommend it under any circumstances, but it does show how big the difference between front and rear braking is.

Jeroen
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Old 27th May 2020, 13:49   #589
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Originally Posted by Jeroen View Post
No, you leave the parking brake disengaged when adjusting the brake shoe. You need to first adjust the brake shoe and next check how much slack the hand brake has, i.e. how many clicks. The workshop manual stipulates 3-5 clicks.

But it is not necessary at all. As this is only the parking brake, there is virtually no wear on the inside of the drum. So the whole disc/drum assembly comes off without slackening up the park brake shoe adjuster.

Raymond told me he checks the handbrake before he takes the disc/drum of to see if there is more than 5 clicks play. If not, he will just put the new disc/drum back on without ever touching the adjuster. Any undue play over 5 clicks is rare and if there is a little he takes it out by adjusting the park brake cable. Which is a lot quicker. Live and learn.
The issue i am facing in my 2010 Hyundai i20 is that even when the handbrake slack is adjusted, the car rolls backwards even on a slight incline. I need to pull the handbrake to the max extent for the car to stop rolling backwards. Even then i feel the brake is barely holding the weight of the car. Also, when i engage the handbrake when the car is moving backwards 1-2 kmph, i feel the rear right suspension travel upwards indicating the brake shoe engagement . The rear left suspension barely shows any movement. This makes me think that when the hand brake is applied, the shoe is not contacting the drum at the rear left wheel and all the load is being taken by the rear right drum. Hence want to get down to adjust the brake shoe at both the wheels. Hence the question
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Old 27th May 2020, 13:57   #590
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Originally Posted by sagarpadaki View Post
. Hence want to get down to adjust the brake shoe at both the wheels.
Yes, that makes sense. On most drum brake system the general procedure is to adjust each brake shoe first before adjusting the park brake handle.

If your hand brake does not hold the car with it being pulled up to the max, it is very likely there is something wrong with the brake shoe adjustment.

Whether you can adjust the shoe brake through a hole in the drum, or need to take the disc/drum assembly off is car specific. I would say, rule of thumb:

If it is a disc brake with drum hand brake most likely you will find a hole through which you poke a screw driver. (similar to the Jaguar)

If it is only a drum brake it is likely you will have to take the drum off to get at the adjuster. (E.g. like of Cees his van).

Many drum brakes have self adjusters. But they donít always work that well, especially when covered with lots of brake dust they might stop working.

Good luck, let us know what you find

Jeroen
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Old 28th May 2020, 00:38   #591
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I found a nice and helpful Dutch modelbuilding forum that has a dedicated section on metal / machining and building model steam engines. So I signed up, put an introduction and asked for some assistance in where to get various parts for metal model building. I want to build this little wobble engine I have got the drawing for.

Within 24 hours I got a mail from a gentleman. He had downloaded the drawings from the wobble engine and got all the parts and pieces I need and mailed them over to me! Very generous, very kind, he only wanted the postage re-imbursed.

Today it all arrived:

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_2698-copy.jpg

So I will be studying the drawing and the bits and pieces I have got now in some more detail. I need to double check if I need anything special such as drill bits. I will need to get myself a knurling tool. Or make myself one. The thing is, with these tools coming from China, making one yourself tends to be way more expensive!

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Old 31st May 2020, 12:10   #592
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Yesterday I started on the Wobble engine. I spend a few hours, reading through all the different steps. I will need some more specific size drill bits and two reamers. I will have to order those. Hardware/DIY stores don’t stock those I think.

I also realised I don’t have a proper centre punch, nor a proper “scratching” pen. I have some that did ok-ish in the past, but some of the holes that need drilling for the wobble engine, need to pretty spot on.

So I got some straight away. Obviously, when I visit a Hardware/DIY store I always come home with more than was on my shopping list.

So a few more files, next to two punches, also an auto-punch, marker and a two more boxes to sort stuff.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-p5300014.jpg

I have the base plate all down to the exact dimension. Next drill the holes.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-p5300018.jpg

Whilst at the Hardware store I also got some more of these little “allan-type bolts”. Remember, I had to use a large bolt on the tap follower which did not look so nice.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-p5300019.jpg

Much improved version

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-p5300020.jpg


Whilst I was very happily fiddling in my garage a new tool arrived. An ultrasonic cleaner! I ordered it earlier this week.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-p5300015.jpg

I did some research into these ultrasonic cleaners. Because there are many of them on the market. This one has a 2.5 L bath. You can find these from Euro 30 to Euro 300, for which at face value is the same machine. Anything bigger and you end up paying some very serious money!

But there is a lot of difference in how they are constructed and operated. This one is made out of 1mm Stainless Steel.

Mine has a heater and thermostat up to 80oC, timer, Different power settings on different frequencies and “Power Transducers”. Which so I am assured, are far superior to normal Transducer.


I had discussed with my wife earlier, she was keen to get one as they do an outstanding job on cleaning jewellery. (many jeweller shops have one)

So when last week HBM had one of these on “special” I jumped at it.

So that was the first thing I tried. Some golden chains, rings etc. Diamonds are fine, but you need to be careful with rubies, gem stones etc. For jewellery you just use water, a bit of vinegar and some washing up liquid. Very good results.

I also tried various parts from my garage. I have also bought a special cleaning fluid. Depending on the material, level of dirt etc you use more or less of it in a water dilution solution.

Somehow I forgot to take images of the “after” look and feel. That will come in due course.

But the water had got quite dirty and lots of residue left on the bottom afterwards. So something has been coming off!

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-p5300016.jpg

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-p5300017.jpg

Today (Sunday) I am going to test out my newly sort of restored test/engine analyser for the first time. Co-owner and friend Berndt will join me and he is likely to bring one of his classic cars too.

Jeroen

Last edited by Jeroen : 31st May 2020 at 12:11.
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Old 31st May 2020, 19:39   #593
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Is that an automatic centre punch in the blue pouch?

If not, I most strongly suggest that you get one. It is one of the most useful tools I have ever owned, and mine has done duty centre-punching many things from gold to concrete! One of the best things about it is that it is a single-handed job.

Ultrasonic cleaner: I have wanted one since for ever! When I was hobby-making jewellery, they were very expensive, and as you have noticed, the pro ones still are, but at least they are now available for lower budgets, even if the cheaper ones are not built to last a lifetime.

All jewellery should be cleaned from time to time, especially if worn often or daily. Lesson learnt: I had to repair some links in a gate bracelet. As soon as I turned the torch on it I had to run away from the stench!

General note: be extra careful with pearls. Watch out for turquoise: the genuine stuff is very porous (touch it with the tip of your tongue to prove!). There's probably more I've forgotten.
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Old 31st May 2020, 22:24   #594
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Default Re: My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Sp

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Originally Posted by Jeroen View Post
Different power settings on different frequencies and “Power Transducers”. Which so I am assured, are far superior to normal Transducer.
Finally. https://www.team-bhp.com/forum/diy-d...ml#post4333392 (At long last: My own man cave...My Garage!)

Piezoelectric for hobbyists, magnetorestrictive for serious stuff. Of course technology might have moved on since my last interaction with these.

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Originally Posted by Thad E Ginathom View Post
Is that an automatic centre punch in the blue pouch?
Almost certainly.

Quote:
If not, I most strongly suggest that you get one. It is one of the most useful tools I have ever owned, and mine has done duty centre-punching many things from gold to concrete! One of the best things about it is that it is a single-handed job.
It is such a simple tool that I thought Jeroen would certainly have it.


Quote:
General note: be extra careful with pearls.
No matter what you do, consider pearls perishable.

Quote:
Watch out for turquoise: the genuine stuff is very porous (touch it with the tip of your tongue to prove!).
I forget which, but it was customary to boil one of the semiprecious materials in olive oil. So that the olive oil would be absorbed, and keep the other stuff out. Maybe today we'll use silicone oil.

Ask your wife about 'seasoning' stone utensils.

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Old 31st May 2020, 22:30   #595
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Originally Posted by Thad E Ginathom View Post
Is that an automatic centre punch in the blue pouch?
.
Yes, it is. I have never tried one. Gave it it a few test in the shop, punching a few centres in one the shelves.

Glad to hear you liked it a lot! I will let you know how I find it.

Had a go testing out my Engine analyser. First put the W123 in place with its exhaust sticking out of my garage.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-p5310001.jpg

Managed to get all the various electrical bits hooked up, including my newly made high Voltage probe. The one thing I did not hook up yet, is the shunt for testing the battery Amps.

You have to admit, even if it would not work at all, it still looks the part!
My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-p5310002.jpg

Just for good measure I also hooked up my recently acquired somewhat newer engine analyser too..

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-p5310003.jpg

Cycled through all the various test

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-p5310005.jpg

There was a bunch of function working properly now, but a few were still giving me problems. Then I realised the W123 has an electronic ignition instead of mechanical breaker points. Leon had managed that it would not work.

So I called my co-owner of the engine analyser and good friend Berndt to come over for some coffee and bring a proper old car!

So Berndt rocked up in his old Mini, he lives 10 minutes drive from us in the next village.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-p5310006.jpg

Nothing electronics on this one. It did have a problem though. It misfired a bit. So we quickly took the spark plugs out. One was very wet. We cleaned them all, re-inserted and the problem persisted. With the engine idling, I pulled the spark plug cable and we listen to the engine sound/rpm. Sure enough each time the RPMs dropped a bit and came back on, when I pushed the cable back on. For good measure we just swapped the suspected spark plug to another cilinder and re did the test. Same thing, something wrong with the spark plug. Cleaned it very thoroughly, inspected it, could not find anything wrong with. We tested it again holding it, in the cable against the valve cover. Sure enough it still sparked, but it did look a bit odd. Gap was fine. So we decreased the gap from 0.8 mm to 0.6mm and that actually improved things considerable. Berndt will swap it out for a new one at home.

So we hooked up the Mini:

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-p5310007.jpg

Some more test. Still a few more things to sort. I will need to take this whole thing apart piece by piece. No hurry though.

Jeroen
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Old 1st June 2020, 16:38   #596
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thad E Ginathom View Post
Is that an automatic centre punch in the blue pouch?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sutripta View Post
It is such a simple tool that I thought Jeroen would certainly have it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeroen View Post
Yes, it is. I have never tried one. Gave it it a few test in the shop, punching a few centres in one the shelves.

Glad to hear you liked it a lot! I will let you know how I find it.
Most people don't seem to know about them. I don't recall seeing them in any of the jewellery textbooks. I discovered mine in a toolshop near to work. When I took it back to the office, a colleague told me that most car thieves knew them well!

Quote:
Piezoelectric for hobbyists, magnetorestrictive for serious stuff. Of course technology might have moved on since my last interaction with these.
That's interesting: I didn't know there were different types, which helps explain the very different pricing.

I have no idea what gem one would soak in olive oil. Usually, the idea is to keep grease away from them. I don't think I did any jewellery since late '80s: I've forgotten a lot.
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