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Old 25th June 2022, 23:05   #916
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Default Re: My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Sp

It probably wouldn't be my favourite day out, but for you: heaven! Nicely described and photographed . Actually, now I think about it, I would enjoy seeing the cars from my childhood.

On another topic, I was wondering about some history, and I'm sure you'll know!

I always imagine the origins of the Jeep to have been the US Military, whilst I think of the Land Rover as having come from British farms.

Is that true, or have I got a misconception because I grew up in rural GB, watching American films?
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Old 26th June 2022, 00:37   #917
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Default Re: My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Sp

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thad E Ginathom View Post

I always imagine the origins of the Jeep to have been the US Military, whilst I think of the Land Rover as having come from British farms.

Is that true, or have I got a misconception because I grew up in rural GB, watching American films?
I think you are spot on!

Jeroen
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Old 27th June 2022, 15:01   #918
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Default Re: My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Sp

Hi Jeroen!!

Its always a pleasure reading your posts and threads, not only are they entertaining but also insightful.

Many times you have shared with us your experience in various events, shows and festivals (the classic car rallies, the shipping festivals, occasional events in the museums, etc) in and around Netherlands.

I am sure many of these festivals, periodic events and gatherings must be going on for the last 50 years or more. And in the pre-internet era such events may be the only option for people to meet, learn, enjoy and have a good time socially.

But now since the mass adoption of the internet are these events starting to experience a drop in participation. Also is the participation from the "young" crowd (below 30s in general) similar to what it was may be 30 yrs ago?

Last edited by suhaas307 : 27th June 2022 at 15:02. Reason: spacing for improved readability
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Old 27th June 2022, 15:38   #919
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Default Re: My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Sp

Quote:
Originally Posted by Par_neon View Post
Also is the participation from the "young" crowd (below 30s in general) similar to what it was may be 30 yrs ago?
Unfortunately, classic cars appeals to mostly the more mature aged public it seems. When I bought my Spider some 26 years ago, I was in my late thirties. So weíre many of the other Spideristi in the Alfa Romeo Spider Register. Although the more modern Spiders appear to appeal to the 30/40 crowd, I would say by and large classic cars appeal to the over 50s mostly. I can be a bit more precies, 50+ white males mostly.

The general public is interested just to have a casual look at them. You will find that these sort of tours, often stop in small towns and line up on the market square before continuing their tour. Always draws a car. Generally people like looking at these cars, remembering maybe their parents or great parents cars.

We were actually supposed to stop inLeerdam. Berndt had arranged for a sponsored lunch for all of us. Unfortunately, something went wrong and the sponsor pulled out. So we skipped the stop.

But oldtimer ownership is for the over 50s. It is a worry because some of the specialist that help keeping these cars roadworthy are of the same generation. It is a dying breed. Very few young people are interested in working with their hands these days.

There are several initiatives in countries such as the Netherlands, and in particular in the UK to interest a younger public both for the hobby of oldtimers as well as seen a job in the supporting industry.

The banning of ICE cars in the next 10-15 years in Western Europe is not helping either. Because it will at some point in time become more difficult to get petrol for our cars. E10 is a problem for most 30+ cars as it is. Quite a few initiatives are ongoing to promote eco friendly synthetic fuels.

Jeroen
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Old 27th June 2022, 22:51   #920
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Default Re: My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Sp

Time to get going on the Jeep: Just to recap:

I want to replace the front crankshaft seal, because its leaking. As it requires pulling the front pulley off, which is also the harmonic balancer I will replace that as well. I figure once every 25 years a new balancer is not a luxury.

Next I want to replace the radiator, because it has two leaks. Tiny, but that will always get worse. Whilst I am doing that I will also replace the thermostat and the water pump.

I started with the crankshaft seal and pulley a couple of days ago. I am taking parts of in a bit of an odd order. That is because I know I will have to take the radiator and other bits of later. Also, I want to see from an early moment, if possible, if I can see any trouble ahead. Sure enough there was trouble!!


First things first. Always disconnect the battery when doing big jobs on your car. My special battery connectors come in very handy for that purpose.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7273.jpeg

Next lets have a good look at these new part that needs fitting. I bought the appropriate puller earlier, I got some extra bolts to go with it that fit in these odd threaded holes. But I need to push the new crankshaft seal in as well. Dont have a real tool. So I look for something round that is big enough.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7274.jpeg

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7275.jpeg

This is just as I had just started. I have already removed the electrical fan on the left hand side.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7276.jpeg

These are pretty straight forward jobs, even so, I try and study them in the manuals I have and look them up on Youtube.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7278.jpeg

The official Jeep workshop manual, only shows how to extract the seal during a complete engine out. We are nog going that way. I am going to extract it, with the engine insure. Just like everybody does, and also shown in the Haynes manual.

Here I have already removed the large support beam on top of the radiator. What surprised me were these little rubber idolaters on top. It all looked very rusty and I had doused them in rust remover.

the one on the left was ok-ish

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7279.jpeg

But the one on the right snapped right off. As it would! Not the thread, but the complete central pin.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7280.jpeg

Here you see the underneath of the support I took off, you can still see the remains of the central pin of the isolated. Simply pulled out of the rubber.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7283.jpeg

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7284.jpeg

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-242fcaef08e340589508052bdf02414d.jpeg

If need be, i could probably salvage this one. But I found two new ones on Bay and ordered them. Might take 10-15 days to arrive. If anything I will fix and install the old ones and replace them with the new ones when they arrive.

The new radiator does have different configurator for these idolaters. But I think they will still fit.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7281.jpeg

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7282.jpeg

I had to take the complete front grill off as well.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7286.jpeg

For no other reason, its the only way to get at the little drain cock. Its hidden otherwise. And as I am working inside my garage, I really need to be a bit careful on extracting the cooling fluid, donít want 8 liters of the stuff all over my garage floor. So I am going to find a hose, hook it up to this little drain cock and try and drain as much coolant into containers as I can, before undoing hoses and such.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7285.jpeg

I had a few worries. One of them being the quick connector on the lower transmission line. The problem with these quick connector is, they simply seize over the years. And then it becomes a quick break connector as you end up breaking the end of the tube off.

With the grill and other bits out of the way, I started spraying it very liberally and frequently with penetrating oil. No way you can get at this connector with everything in place.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7288.jpeg

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7287.jpeg

Good news, the upper transmission line came off very easily without any problem.
You see it here, metal connector, just above the black large diameter coolant rubber hose.

Click image for larger version

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I had to take the drive belt off, obviously. So one thing you need to do is to double check the routing of the belt across the various accessory drives, pulleys, tensioners and what not. I take lots of photographs, just in case.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7289.jpeg

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7290.jpeg

Also, the Jeep manual shows the various routings for the various engine variants.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7292.jpeg

Itís just a question of loosening the tensioner and taking it off.
This is a serious long drive belt!! I inspected it very closely. I canít find anything wrong with it, so it goes back on for now.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7293.jpeg

Here we are, with some more things out of the way, we are beginning to get access to the pulley/harmonic balancer.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7295.jpeg

In order to get access, I had to lift the shroud of the other fan (canít take it off) and move the upper transmission line out of the way. The transmission line is packed in plastic wrapped with lots of tape, to prevent any leaks.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7296.jpeg

First thing it to get the central bolt out of the pulley. That bolt is tightened to 108 Nm and is not going to budge easily. Problem is you will rotate the engine crankshaft before it breaks loose. I tried various ways to immobilise the crankshaft. In the end two bolts in the pulley and a tire lever though it, gave me enough leverage to undo the central bolt with a large socket wrench.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7297.jpeg

Next getting the puller ready to do its job!

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7299.jpeg
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Old 28th June 2022, 02:24   #921
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Default Re: My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Sp

In order to pull the pulley off, you need to ensure that the puller is fitted correctly to it. I had bought the new bolts of the correct thread. But it was very difficult getting them into the threads. I spend a huge amount of time, cleaning and driving them in and out, every single time a little bit further.

This is how far I got the first try:

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7301.jpeg

Still was not happy with it. I was not convince the bolts went in far enough. They need at least 10-12mm in, to be secure. So another hour and half fiddling and then it looked better. Probably difficult to see, but the puller sits about 3-4 mm closer then at the previous attempt.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7305.jpeg

I started turning the centre bolt slowly and it came without any problem!!

This is how it came off eventually, lots of turns and due to it all being a bit cramped under there, I could only do about a 25oC turn with my socket wrench. But steady and slow it came off.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7306.jpeg

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7307.jpeg

First time I could have a good look at the crankshaft seal:

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7308.jpeg

Prying it out was relatively straight forward. I have several pullers and implements that can help you getting these seals out. Next I spend another hour cleaning everything.

Next I pressed the new seal in place by using one of these rings I had chosen earlier. Needs to have a slightly smaller outside diameter than the seal. A few gentle taps with a hammer and the new seal was properly seated.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7362.jpeg

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7363.jpeg

Next to get the new pulley/harmonic balancer back onto the shaft. I stuck it inside my wife’s oven for about an hour at 50oC.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7364.jpeg

I had my special bolts at the ready, with some additional washers. Again you really want to have at least 10-12 mm of thread engaging. It went on very smoothly, no problem at all. I think warming the pulley up to 50oC made it all a little more easy.

I had to torque the original centre bolt to 108 Nm. I put a few more bolts back into the pulley, stuck a screw driver through and that gave me sufficient leverage, so I would not be turning the engine whilst tightening the bolt.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7365.jpeg

Time to start working on the cooling system. First business of the day, drain as much as I can. Hose attached to the little drain cock.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7369.jpeg

Old oil canister to catch the coolant.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7368.jpeg

When I started undoing some hoses, more coolant came out of those, so I put a few drip pans underneath the car. All coolants is collected and will be disposed off, through the council garbage disposal fascility.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7371.jpeg

Took a bit of wiggling, but here it is! Old radiator is finally out!!

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7372.jpeg

My special hose clip pliers worked really well!

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7370.jpeg

By the way, I could not get the quick-disconnect of the transmission line to quick disconnect. I had my special quick disconnect tool kit. But nothing would budge it.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7366.jpeg

In the end I decided to just saw the inlet pipe off the old radiator so I could at least take the radiator out.

Next was to try and free up the quick disconnect connector from the sawn off piece of pipe.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7373.jpeg

I tried every trick in the book. Then I found a new trick which involved clamping the grip pliers that were holding the connector, with a clamp down the chassis. So it was properly secured. After a very long struggle (must have worked on it for 1,5 hours) I managed to pull it free.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7374.jpeg

Hot work, time for a cup of tea!!

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7304.jpeg

Next I took the thermostat house off the engine, two bolts only.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7375.jpeg

When I checked the old thermostat with the new one, I discovered a difference. The old thermostat has got a little ball valve made into the flange. This needs to be orientated towards the top and is supposed to aid the de-airing of the system.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7376.jpeg

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7378.jpeg

I phoned around, but nobody had a thermostat with this little valve anymore, so I decided to stick the one in I had bought earlier. First a lot of cleaning.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7379.jpeg

You really need to ensure both flanges are very clean. I have some special scrapers that will allow you to take off the majority of the old packing. Then I use a small wire brush in my pneumatic drill. Works a treat.

New thermostat fitted:

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7381.jpeg

Put the thermostat housing back on, tightened it very carefully to the specified torque, re-attached the hoses and this is done!

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7382.jpeg

Next job, the water pump and putting the radiator back in and dealing with the elusive quick disconnect coupling

Last edited by Jeroen : 28th June 2022 at 02:25.
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Old 28th June 2022, 04:04   #922
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Default Re: My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Sp

Would a trip to your favourite toolshop have yielded a set of taps to help clear out those bolt holes? Or do they only stock present-day usual metric stuff?
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Old 28th June 2022, 10:49   #923
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Default Re: My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Sp

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thad E Ginathom View Post
Would a trip to your favourite toolshop have yielded a set of taps to help clear out those bolt holes? Or do they only stock present-day usual metric stuff?
Yes, it is difficult getting non metric stuff. You might be able to get a complete set with all different sizes, but I would require two sets as well having two different kinds of thread to contend with.

Jeroen
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Old 28th June 2022, 11:36   #924
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Default Re: My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Sp

When I started on the water pomp I realised I should have taken the bolts of the pulley of before taking the belt of. Because without the belt the pulley turns freely .
Gave it a try with my impact wrench, that worked surprisingly well!!

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7383.jpeg

Four bolts undone, it took quite some force to pry the pulley of the pump. Eventually with the help of my trusted tire lever it popped off.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7384.jpeg

Here you see me using my fancy hose clip plier, with remote control. Extremely useful on some of these ďhiddenĒ hose clamps!

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7385.jpeg

The pump is attached to the front of the engine with four bolts. Important: they have different sizes, so make sure you remember which bolt goes where!

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7386.jpeg

Lots of cleaning of the mating surface again. Look inside, that cilinder looks very clean. Virtually no debris and hardly any rust in the coolant liquid! That was quite a surprise. It means that the system had been well maintained and the coolant regularly refreshed, most likely.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7387.jpeg

Old pump on the work bench to be checked versus the new one as is usual.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7388.jpeg

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7389.jpeg

These pumps have a separate J- shaped tube attached to them. They always rust badly and might be difficult to remove. So I had ordered a new one with the new pump, made sense I thought.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7390.jpeg

Pump back on again. In order to re-install it I had to undo the complete power steering pump assembly as well. I had hoped not to, but I just could not get the pump back in place properly. So decided to remove it too. You want to make sure the pump and the gasket are really flush with the front of the engine, before starting to torque up the bolts.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7393.jpeg

Tried this tool to hold the pulley from turning when torquing up the four bolts. But it would not hold. So I will have to wait till I have the belt back on, before I can properly tighten these bolts.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7394.jpeg

New radiator ready to go in! Took 2 minutes to fit it back in. Re-attached all hoses. But I have a problem with the lower transmission line. That quick connector is properly buggered! These connector are crimped onto the hoses and the hose is crimped onto the steel tube, which goes all the way back to the transmission case. Which means I will have to replace the complete hose/tubing assembly. Also, I am not quite sure how these quick connect work, or rather how and what kind of O-rings are required. There is also a quick connector on the transmission case, slightly different kind again. So I need to figure out what I need and where I can order it.

Jeroen
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My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7395.jpeg  

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Old 1st July 2022, 16:05   #925
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Default Re: My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Sp

It took quite a bit of googling and phoning around. But I have found somebody that can supply me a new transmission line at a reasonable price. I ordered it, should arrive sometime next week

So this morning I decided, in preparation of the new one, to take the old one of. It was still connected to the transmission. Undid it, also a quick connect. This one came out real easy. Getting the whole transmission line from underneath the car and the engine block was a bit of a puzzle.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7404.jpeg

Here you see the other end (as opposed to the hose). This tube has a little flange on it, around it a plastic insert which keeps it in place. You push the two clips together to unfasten it from the female connector, threaded into the transmission box.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7405.jpeg

I managed to pry of without damaging it, I think.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7407.jpeg

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7406.jpeg

Although it looks in reasonably good shape I would prefer to mount the new transmission line with a new insert too. This is a case where a Euro 100 transmission line is held in place and sealed with a Euro 0,50 bit!!

But sofar I have been unlucky in finding anybody that can help out. Iíve send a few mails to the official Jeep dealers too. Letís see what turns up.

Jeroen
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