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Old 30th July 2022, 12:26   #946
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Re: My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Sp

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thad E Ginathom View Post
Plus the duty and VAT. Plus the fee for collecting the duty+VAT. Plus the VAT on the fee for collecting the duty+VAT.

True, but I found the parts from the USA to be so much cheaper as here in Europe in many cases it does make sense. The Euro 250-300 range would be for the compressor including all shipment, handling, VAT and import duties.

The compressor itself only costs $ 126!! I have bought quite a few items from Rockauto already, much cheaper including all the extra cost to get it delivered home in the Netherlands.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-screenshot-20220730-8.52.40-am.png

But anyway, it doesnít look like it is the compressor after all. Yesterday I spoke to Ton, the owner of the shop that sold me the alternator. He will help me trying to figure out what is wrong. It will mean taking it off the Jeep again and putting it on a test rig at Tonís shop. We will also take some exact measurements to see if the old one and new one are identical.

I had a look if I could swap out the old/new pulley. But it looks the bolt is a different size and I do need to take the alternator off before I can remove it.

This Monday the Jeep goes back to Martin for a bit of welding. I will ask him as well to have a look. Maybe he has a an idea. If not, its back to Ton and his test rig.

Jeroen
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Old 3rd August 2022, 15:20   #947
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Re: My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Sp

Earlier, my Jeep went to my local friendly Jeep specialist Martin. I wanted some welding done on the right hand sill and underneath the battery tray. I also asked Martin to see what he thought about the squeaky belt.

I went to pick it up yesterday afternoon. They did a really good job, welding some new bits in place and rust proofing everything. Very happy with it. Martin also told me he solved the belt by just tightening it. I was doubtful about that, as I had experienced with different tensions.

So we started the Jeep and immediately it started squeaking again! So we had another good look, confirmed it is not the compressor. With some help we managed to get a stethoscope on the rear bearing of the alternator. Sure enough that was the problem very clearly!!

On the way home from Martin I called my local friendly Alternator supplier Ton. He said he would order a new alternator straight away and it would arrive this morning. So first thing this morning I took the alternator of again.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7651.jpg

Just as I was finished Ton called. The new alternator had arrived, so I drove over to his shop.

The new alternator appeared to be a different brand, but looks identical as far as the critical dimensions are concerned and the current and voltage ratings. So I picked it up from Ton’s workbench, only to notice something rattling. At first we thought it was just the loose nuts/rings of the electrical connections. But there was a bolt loose inside the alternator. Ton opened it up and it was one of the bolts that holds the support for the bushes in place!! So that was an easy fix.

Another shiny new alternator on my workbench

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7653.jpg

It took me only 45 minutes to put it back in my Jeep. Started her up and it looks like the squeak is now gone!!!

Last week I happened to be near my favourite tools shop HBM. They had this neat set of impact socket extenders on sale. Only euro 6!! Other than the lug nut sockets I dont have real impact tools, but these extenders and various other bits will come in handy when I am using my pneumatic wrenches as well.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7652.jpg

With the Jeep fixed I decided to investigate the cracked rubber sleeves on the lower ball joints of the Jaguar. These were noticed during the last MOT. No holes yet, but it needs fixing. I checked the Jaguar workshop manual to see if it had a procedure, but they only show a complete replacement of the ball bearing. Which also involves taking the complete swivel arm off.

I did not want to do that, because if anything you need a very special Jaguar spring compressor for it. None of my spring compressors will do.

So decided to jack up the Jaguar, take the wheel off and have a good look.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7646.jpg

Here you have a good look on the whole front suspension. It looks like the lower swivel arm is held in place by both the stabilisor bar and the shock absorber. Which suggest I can just release the ball bearing without having to worry about the spring.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7647.jpg

Here you can clearly see the rubber sleeve. Definitely needs replacing soon.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7648.jpg

The top one is in much better shape!!

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7649.jpg

I gave my Jaguar specialist Raymond a call. He has the sleeves in stock. He also confirmed that I dont need to worry about the springs. I can just release the ball bearing as I thought. But he did warn me about doing this job on the jack, or use two jacks. Both front wheels need to be off the ground. If not the stabilisor bar might put too much force on the assembly. He did advise to check the alignment afterwards as well.

I will probably let Raymond do this little job. With the car on a lift it is done in less than 10 minutes per side. Also, I have some sort of occasional cloink which I think is suspension related too. As you might recall I replace the mounts for the shock absorbers not too long ago as well. So best get the alignment checked after all these jobs, in one go.

This Friday the Jaguar will get is roofline replaced! I am looking forward to have that done!!

Jeroen
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Old 3rd August 2022, 15:51   #948
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Re: My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Sp

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeroen View Post

I will probably let Raymond do this little job. With the car on a lift it is done in less than 10 minutes per side. Also, I have some sort of occasional cloink which I think is suspension related too. As you might recall I replace the mounts for the shock absorbers not too long ago as well. So best get the alignment checked after all these jobs, in one go.
I think it is better to get it done by your mechanic. The strut indeed makes things complicated if both sides not on lift.. And any modifications/replacements to suspension components is to be followed with wheel alignment for the fix to work correctly. Without alignment, the replaced part starts to wear out old parts depending on which is the weakest link. With respect to 'occasional' clonk, there are 4 possibilities that you can check already :

1. Play in steering: Does this occasional clonk happen on extreme turning? Can be checked easily by turning from extreme left to right and vice versa while parked. Then make small left to right angles at larger speed (like wiggling)

2. Worn bushes/suspension components: With the front wheels on lifts, try to hold the wheel at 12 and 6 positions and try to make a rotation in driving axis. Should not make any strange noise.

3. Play in driveshaft mounts: This is a tricky one and most likely wont be heard under normal acceleration deceleration, but occasionally on high torque/sudden accelerations.

4. Loosened catalytic coverter/downpipe/silencer mounts: This most likely feels like a clonk, coming from front, because of the sound amplified by the reliefs in the underbody being a dome like shape. Very tricky to find. So this is the last one to check.

And probably the mechanic with his experience with specific type of cars, will be able to even find it much easily.

Last edited by carthick1000 : 3rd August 2022 at 16:02.
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Old 8th August 2022, 13:51   #949
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Re: My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Sp

Over the weekend my Jaguar got a new headliner. I am very pleased with the end result. It was done by Ezra. He is in the process of setting up his own car interior repair company, whilst still holding a full time regular job.

I had come across him on Facebook at one of the Jaguar club pages. Various members were reporting on his excellent workmanship. So I called him, made an appointment to see him.

Car roof liners will almost all start to sag at some point in time. The roof liner material is covered with a sort of foam/felt at the back. This is glued to the roof. Over time the foam/felt starts to disintegrate and the liner will sag. Having your car out in the open, in the hot sun, will make it worse. My Jaguar has always been kept in a garage, also by the original owner. The other thing is the quality of the materials used. Jaguar did not use good materials on their cars. On this type, the X308 you would be lucky to survive beyond twenty years without a sagging headliner. My forty year old Mercedes does not show any signs of a sagging head liner. Fingers crossed!

Repairing car roof liners is quite the specialist job. I know a few guys who have done it themselves. Man gotta know its limitations, as the saying goes. And I certainly know mine when it comes to working on cars. The official Jaguar procedure is to remove the rear windows and pull the liner out towards the rear. I also know, nobody does that. You can fold the liner and get it out through one of the doors, if you remove a chair. That is how Ezra would be doing it too.

Last Friday afternoon I took my Jaguar to Ezraís new workshop. He had just rented a nice garage (former Alfa Romeo shop). I arrived at 15.00 hours, Ezra dropped me off at the local train station so I could get home. The next day at 16.30 the Jaguar was ready once again.

Here you can see that the lining has come loose at the rear. It is really beginning to show as it is hanging down.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-photo20220806191843-2.jpg

Here you see it from a different angle, the centre console is already removed

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-photo20220805220012.jpg

With the liner removed

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-photo20220806191843.jpg

As part of this job the sliding roof has to come out as well, as it is covered in the same material as the roof. Here you see the old material. Notice it had some water stains, which indicates at some point it had a leak. That most have been way before my time. Ezra did tell me that the roof liner, or at least the sliding roof had been done before. There was also evidence of some repair work on the sliding roof drains.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-photo20220805220013.jpg

Old material removed

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-photo20220805220014.jpg

New material attached

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-photo20220805220014-2.jpg

The little centre roof console had to come off too

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-photo20220806191839-3.jpg

Old material removed

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-photo20220806191839-2.jpg

New material attached

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-photo20220806191839.jpg

Same with the complete liner:

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-photo20220806191840-2.jpg

Attachment 2343316

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-photo20220806191841-2.jpg

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-photo20220806191841.jpg

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-photo20220806191842-2.jpg

Click image for larger version

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All in all I am very happy I got this job done. I am very pleased by the end result. We did not re-upholster the sun visors. They were still in very good conditon and also they had all sorts of original stickers and text on it I wanted to retain.

The material used by Ezra matches the old material very closely, both in texture and colour. Nobody will notice it is ever so slightly different.

Many thanks to Ezra who also provided all photographs.

Jeroen
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Old 15th August 2022, 12:25   #950
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Re: My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Sp

We are suffering from a heatwave here in most of Western Europe and specifically here in the Netherlands. It means that the temperature of 5 consequetive is over 25oC and three of those days must be over 30oC. So we are not talking Delhi Blistering 45oC or so. Still, for us this is hot and it tends to be humid and well as hot.

Last Thursday was forecasted to be well over 30oC. So I decided to take the Spider for a nice day out in the province of Zeeland. Which tends to be a bit cooler with lots of water and sea.

Very nice day. Driving along endless little dikes, stopping at locks to see all the boats go through.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7663.jpg

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7664.jpg

I stopped for lunch in Zierikzee. A very picturesque little town.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7665.jpg

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7666.jpg

Lunch was, very traditional, cooked mussels!

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-fe86954a181b40b39ba9fc8c864074dd.jpg

Some more driving along these sort of very pretty dike roads;

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7670.jpg

Very nice day, did about 200 kilomters or so. Finally, it looks like I got rid of all spilt oil from my earlier little incident of not putting the oil filler gap back on. The Spider has been leaking bits of oil ever since. Every time after a short drive, I found puddles of oil underneath it afterwards. Now, after driving around for a full day in the blistering sun, it has seeped out from every crack.

I am not entirely sure about the Spider steering. It seems to have developed a bit of play. I will need to look at it in some more detail.

Jeroen
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Old 15th August 2022, 18:32   #951
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Re: My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Sp

You live in a beautiful country! My only problem with it would be that it is so flat.

Well, that and the opportunity of failing to learn yet another language of course! <BLUSH>

Did I spot leeboards? Did I remember the right name for them?
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Old 16th August 2022, 13:08   #952
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Re: My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Sp

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thad E Ginathom View Post
You live in a beautiful country! My only problem with it would be that it is so flat.
Well yes, although there is quite hilly countryside further south. Also, the Netherlands is very small and very close to mountains/Hills nearby. An hour and a half drive gets you to the Ardennes and two hours drive gets you into the Eiffel area. You can get just about any sort of terrain in Europe you care for, but you might have to cross one or several country borders.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thad E Ginathom View Post
Did I spot leeboards? Did I remember the right name for them?

Yes, correct leeboards. Just about all traditional flat bottom sailing barges have them. One of each side. The one on the preside will be lowered into the water and when you tack you hoist it up and lower the other one. Heavy work, these things are heavy!


I spend a couple of hours fiddling with the Spider and the Jaguar. I had noticed a bit of play in the steering of the Spider. Not too long ago I adjusted the play on the steering box and also the slave steering box has been replaced.

I put the Spider on two axle stands to get the front wheels of the ground.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7817.jpg

Put a micro-gauge against the rim and rocked the steering wheel back and forth a bit.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7816.jpg

Definitely some play. I can hear something ticking, metal to metal sound, when I move the steering wheel back and forth.

Also, when I grab the wheel I can feel play in the horizontal plane, not the vertical. Both sides. Which suggest it is not the bearing/suspension but more likely somewhere in the steering mechanism. I spend about an hour and a half trying to trace it. Had my wife rocking the steering wheel. Listened to every joint and component with my stethoscope. Could not find anything.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7818.jpg

I must admit doing this sort of work on your back under a low slung car on axle stands is far from ideal. Finally called Goos, my Spider specialist and I will go and see him in two weeks time. With the Spider on the lift it should be a lot easier to diagnose the problem.

Next the Jaguar. There are two problems. The area around the petrol filler neck was not draining anymore. Water, but also spilled petrol collect there. I noticed it the other day driving back and forth to the Nurburgring.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7819.jpg

The whole area just needed some good cleaning. First I took the vacuum cleaner to it, next blew it out with compressed air. Should be good to go.

The other problem is a bit more complex and has been bothering me on and off for the last 4-5 years. On occasion the tank will not fill fully. No matter what you do or try, the petrol filler nozzle will cut out at approx 2/3 capacity from full.

It used to happen only every now and then. But lately it has happened just about every time I try to fill up. There are actually two possible causes. The fuel gauge might be indicating incorrectly, or there is something wrong with the fuel vent system, which is also part of fuel evaporation emission system.

It is a known problem with these cars. There is a Jaguar Technical bulletin on this phenomena. Many Jaguar owners have suffered from it. More so as these cars get older.

First thing is get a bit of access to the fuel tank. Easy enough by removing the rear trim in the trunk.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7822.jpg

All the electrical connections appear to be on top of the fuel tank

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7820.jpg


The XJR has two electrical pumps built into the fuel tank and also the fuel gauge sensor of course. According to my Jaguar workshop manual the fuel gauge sensor should be built into the side of the fuel tank. It clearly is not in my car!!

Which is a pain. There is an easy test you can perform on the fuel gauge sensor. Just measuring resistance with a multimeter. From full to empty it should be somwhere in between 70 and 1000 ohm. But for the life of me I canít figure out where this sensor is fitted.

Getting the fuel tank out of this car is a huge undertaking. Not sure I can face that. I will need to do some more digging into my manual. Maybe I can pick up the two wires going to the sensor on a plug and measure it that way.

There is a list of other things that needs checking as well. I just did not have enough time. We needed the Jaguar in running order as we had to travel to see some friends later that day.

Just a few things on this Jaguar. As the above image shows I have a full sized spare wheel/tire. But it is too big really for the boot. Which means the bottom half of the boot never sits completely flush.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7826.jpg

I am not worried about that. I prefer a proper real size spare! And I always carry a lot of stuff in the boot anyway, so it hardly shows

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7827.jpg


Here another peculiarity of this Jaguar. Two massive fuses against the rear panel in the boot.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7824.jpg

These are 80A fuses or thereabouts. Both the plus as well as the minus main circuits are fused on this Jaguar. Very few people know it has these fuses. They are not described in the owner manual. Over time they will start to corrode causing all sorts of electrical problems. These cars are very finicky to have a good enough supply voltage to all the electronics. Corrosion of fuses, or grounds, causes endless problems!

So I did not accomplish much on either car, but that is ok. I am happy just fiddling about. I am also going to take the centre console out of the Jaguar. I need access to my FM modulator for my iPod/iPhone. It doesnít tune in properly anymore, so I am going to try and get it set up on a different frequency. Not a big job, but I need to figure out how to get the console out again. I have done it before, but that was 20 years ago, when I had just bought the Jaguar in Kansas City.

Jeroen
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Old 18th August 2022, 16:02   #953
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Re: My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Sp

Today I decided to see if I could get my iPod FM modulator on my Jaguar going again. These Jaguars have a pretty decent sound system to start with. But it is all from the late 90s early 2000. This car is from 2002. So whereas the system itself is pretty good, radio/casette/CD changer/8 speakers including tweeters etc, it was never designed to play music from other devices such as iPods and or iPhones, or any other device for that matter.

When I bought this car in Kansas City in 2009, iPodís where still THE thing. iPhones were only just introduced a couple of years earlier. They did not go mainstream till a couple years later with the introduction of the iPhone 4. (I know as I was one of the first to have one!)

So in those days, apart from listening to the radio, you would carry cassette tapes and CDsin your car. But I wanted to listen to my iPod music. You might be familiar with these sort of cassette like adaptors. You shove it into the cassette player, it has a little wire trailing to which you connect your iPod or any other music device. So the music plays over the head on the cassette deck. It work, in fact I still use it on the 1980s radio cassette deck in my Mercedes W123 and Alfa Spider!!

You can also get these little FM broadcast device. Essentially it broadcasts on the FM band and your radio just picks it up. But an even better solution is a so called FM modulator. An FM modulator injects the signal directly into the aerial, so it is hardwired into your aerial system.

I got mine based on the recommendation from a couple of fellow Jaguar owners on an USA Jaguar forum. Ordered it and installed it. It also powers/charges the iPod/iPhone and also it displays the artist and song name on the radio display. You still use some sound quality, but it is probably the best solution if your car audio system does not have a separate input for external music devices.

It was one of the first things I did to mj Jaguar when I bought it in 2009. So it has been working fine for over 13 years by now. But recently it has been giving me some problems. It would not always tune in properly, or rather somehow the radio was on the correct frequency, but no sound.

I vaguely remembered you can change the frequencies on which the FM Modulator broadcasts. So I decided to open up the centre console to take it out. I knew I managed to install it behind the audio system. With a wire running into the centre arm rest to plug in my devices.

When removing trim on old cars you want to be very careful. Make sure you know how it is supposed to come apart. These old plastic become brittle over the years and will snap easily. The quality of the plastic trim used by Jaguar is not very good. So I looked up the procedure in my X308 workshop manual.

It is really simple:

First thing is to move the gear lever out of P. It needs to be out of the way or you wonít be able to get other parts out. You need to have the ignition on to be able to move the lever. Once in the correct position, I switched of the ignition and also disconnected the battery.

On this image the bezel surrounding the J-gate has already been removed. It just clicks into place. Two fingers on each side and you pry it off easily

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7829.jpg

Next undo 2 bolts and two nuts and the retainer plate comes off. Undo two electrical connectors for the cruise control and Sports mode. Also, remove the knob on the lever. In this case it just screws off.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7830.jpg

Very, very careful pry off the veneered panel. It is known as the ski-slope due to its shape. You really want to be very very careful with. If you damage it and need to replace it, it is going to cost a vast amount of money, if you can find one in the correct colour and grain.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7831.jpg

Next the complete radio and climate control comes out after removing three small screws. Except it did not, the climate control stayed in place as I pulled on the radio. The plastic frame holding the climate control unit and the radio unit together had broken!! Canít be helped.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7832.jpg

If you look carefully you can see the FM modulator at the far end. It sits behind the radio once installed.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7833.jpg

Here you see it. Its made by a company called Dice. Not sure if they still exist. Used to be a UK based company that specialised in this sort of car audio stuff.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7834.jpg

At the back of the FM modulator a diagram showing how to set the different frequencies. Set with two small toggle switches.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7835.jpg

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7836.jpg

Funnily enough, my radio has never been tuned into the frequency set! The idea is to find a frequency that is not in use and put it into your radio memory. As the modulator injects the signal directly into the aerial it is usually much stronger than any signal in the atmosphere. So interference tends to be a none problem.

But I also seem to recall that you could actually set the frequency to any value by means of potentiometer or so?

So I disconnected the modulator and opened it up. My memory must have been wrong as there is nothing that can be adjusted other than the toggle switches.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7838.jpg

So tried a different setting

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7839.jpg

With the radio still out of the console I connected up the FM modulator, hooked up the battery and put the ignition on. This is what the radio showed

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7840.jpg

I forgot about that!! Radio theft from cars has always been a huge problem. So many radioís, even factory fitted ones do come with some sort of anti theft protection. Like a code.

Luckily I have all the original Jaguar documents and manuals. The previous owners were very careful and had kept everything.

So punched in the code:

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7841.jpg

I tried a few different settings of the toggle switches.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7842.jpg

Tested each one with my iPods. Yes I still have multiple iPods, on a 2002 Jaguar they are considered period. And I am a bit of a retro tech nerd of course as well. So I tend to keep things like that.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7843.jpg

I found that the system appeared to be working best on the 107.7MHz. So that is how it is set up now and stored in my radio memory.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7846.jpg

Put everything back together again. Dropped one of the screws. Which can be a real pain, because it will drop alongside the side of the transmission tunnel. So it could cause a rattle, worse shorten something eventually.

Luckily managed to retrieve it with one of my handy little ďgrabbersĒ.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7844.jpg

Everything works great again. Very happy I finally managed to get around to this little job. Tomorrow we are leaving for a long weekend of touring Belgium, so we can listen to all our music and just stream Spotify from my iPhone onto the Jaguarís sound system. Of course, being an old git, I also have several thousand songs stored on my iPods and iPhone. All bought and paid for before we ever heard of streaming. And 6 CDs in the CD changer in the boot.

As I rummaged through the car documentation looking for the radio code, I also came across this poster. In the USA car dealers are obliged to have these displayed on the cars for sale. It is (or was) a sort of standardised way of informing the public on the details and price of the car.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7847.jpg

These Jaguars came with a lot of owner and driver documentation.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7848.jpg

Looking forward to be driving my Jaguar into Belgium. We will be staying in Namur, a very nice old citadel town. On Saturday we are visiting nearby Temploux. This weekend sees what is probably, if not the largest, certainly the best, brocante market. 7 km of brocante market stall strung out all over the village.

https://www.temploux.be/brocante/index-en.html
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Old 21st August 2022, 12:52   #954
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Re: My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Sp

Made a very nice trip this weekend with the Jaguar. We drove to Namur Belgium. Namur is nice little old citadel town.

https://www.namurtourisme.be/en/

It is only about 200 kilometers, mostly motorways. So we pointed the leaper on our Jaguar south and started driving. Week days will always see some congestion on the ring roads of Antwerp and Brussel. Including a coffee and fuel stop it took us about 2,5 hours. Again, I could not fill the Jaguarís fuel tank fully. Stopped again at about 2/3 full. More do investigate there.

We had booked at Les Tanneurs. http://www.tanneurs.com

If you ever find yourself staying in Namur we can highly recommend it. Itís located very conveniently in the centre, with adequate private parking. The hotel itself is situated in, what at some time was a, tannery. Nothing to see other than some photographs. But it is essentially several old buildings, beautifully restored and joined together inside. So it is a bit of maze. You have to make your way across multiple stairs and allyís. But we enjoy that. Two excellent restaurants at the hotel too. One, a very nice Grill and a very posh French Cuisine Restaurant. We dined in the grill.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7876.jpg

We spend the whole afternoon wandering around Namur. We took a little cable car all the way to the top of the hill on which the old citadel was built and walked down across all the old fortifications. The town itself is small, but very nice. Endless cafe, brasseries, restaurants and little shops. Lots of students about. Namur has a university and has some 6500 students. We like student towns, always lively!

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-14ed3309bc884019aae1ba5fb24223ce.jpg

The next day, Saturday, we had an excellent breakfast. By 08.45 we had loaded up the Jaguar and were heading out to Temploux, only a twenty minute drive.

Not sure how many of our members have ever visited a Brocante market. You will find lots of these in Belgium, and also France. They are also referred to as flea markets. Originally, it is were people would offer their used goods for sale, on streets corners. Brocante market are very much a social thing too. In France in particularly it is often one of the main events of the year for villages. Everybody comes out, walks around, has a bite to eat, drink, look at all the stuff on display.

some of these flea/Brocante market are not much more than just a sort of organised garage or boot sale. The Temploux Brocante market is much much better with a lot of professional seller offering just about anything. From the very simple and kitch to proper antique stuff.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-1e67d48cd33e40bb81a9a1e5d5fc5064.jpg

Temploux has 6-7 kilomters of market stalls, both sides of the road. In a very large circular route. If you ever visit make sure you arrive early. If you arrive late, you wonít find nearby parking and you will need to walk for miles before even getting to the market. Also, all the good bargain are snapped up early according to my wife. Not too sure, because she was still buying at 15.00 hours in the afternoon, just prior to us leaving.

Have a look at some on the stuff on display

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7885.jpg

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7886.jpg

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7888.jpg

Some people are into serious buying and bring buggies to take all their newly acquired stuff home. Itís a bit like to Beaulieu auto parts market, but then you can get just about anything here, not just car parts.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7883.jpg

One of my wifeís hobbyís is period dress making. She is a member of the Meriton society (https://themerytonsociety.nl/lid-worden/). So she is always on the look out for period dresses, gloves, hats and materials. She bought quite a few materials and a complete dinner set.

Some more interesting stuff

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7889.jpg

There is always a good selection of tools and I just love these kind of measuring instruments!

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7891.jpg

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7892.jpg

Mrs D bargain hunting!

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7893.jpg

By 15.30 we had seen it all. We loaded up the Jaguar with all our treasures. Boot and rear seats full of stuff. Thank God I did not take the Jeep, or my wife would have bought some antique furniture too.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7897.jpg

Another 2,5 hour drive home. One more fuel stop. I managed to fill the petrol tank completely by twisting the filler nozzle 180o! Interesting, if that does the job, it will make life a lot easier than trying to fix this.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7894.jpg

I only bought a few things. Two new signs for my garage. And this little panel with lots of switches. I will use them to make an ďelectronicĒ box of tricks for the grand children. I made one for our kids many years ago. Different switches and buttons, that would ring bells, buzzers and lights. The kids played with it endlessly, pretending it was the control panel of a train, or a rocket, or a plane!!

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-img_7898.jpg

We love these little trips. And we love driving to and from in our Jaguar. Even though this is mostly motorway driving, there is something quite magical in wafting along in sumptuous leather seats, wood trim all around you!!

This Thursday I am taking the Spider to Goos to get it up on the lift and check the steering play.

Jeroen
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Old 21st August 2022, 13:22   #955
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Re: My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Sp

Wow! the flea market photos are most interesting. Especially the bicycle with the ABG cycle engine kit. I guess the quaintness of old tech is a charm which few still appreciate.
All the best with the switches board- reminds of my Dad tinkering with valve radios and twin spool decks when I was a kid
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Old 21st August 2022, 16:54   #956
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Re: My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Sp

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Originally Posted by Jeroen View Post
The other problem is a bit more complex and has been bothering me on and off for the last 4-5 years. On occasion the tank will not fill fully. No matter what you do or try, the petrol filler nozzle will cut out at approx 2/3 capacity from full.
How does this work? How does the car physically stop the petrol-pump nozzle from delivering more petrol?

I have to admit that I don't know how the nozzles work, but had assumed that the sense back pressure from the full tank. I don't see how anything else but the tank and the fuel could affect this?
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Old 22nd August 2022, 13:17   #957
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Re: My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Sp

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Originally Posted by Freespirit27 View Post
Wow! the flea market photos are most interesting. Especially the bicycle with the ABG cycle engine kit. I guess the quaintness of old tech is a charm which few still appreciate.
All the best with the switches board- reminds of my Dad tinkering with valve radios and twin spool decks when I was a kid
Thanks, check the image underneath the bicycle. That instrument is a tube or valve tester. Your dad would like it!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thad E Ginathom View Post
How does this work? How does the car physically stop the petrol-pump nozzle from delivering more petrol?

I have to admit that I don't know how the nozzles work, but had assumed that the sense back pressure from the full tank. I don't see how anything else but the tank and the fuel could affect this?
Petrol nozzle cut off on release of vacuum created inside the venturi build in the nozzle. Here is a nice video explaining it.



My Jaguar has a so called ORVR system. (On board Refueling Vapour Recovery). Most modern cars will have something similar. It prevents fuel vapour being vented into the atmosphere directly whilst refuelling.

Have a look at the system description

Name:  Jaguar evap system 12.jpeg
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Name:  Jaguar evap system 22.jpeg
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The peculiar thing is this: You would think if the nozzle cuts of prematurely, just waiting for 10 seconds or so would fix the problem. Fuel would drain back into the tank and so on. Somehow that never works. Many Jaguar owners report that twisting the fuel dispenser in different positions will help. I have experienced this many times myself, like last time in Belgium.

If anything I do know that the fuel level sensor and fuel gauge are working fine. As I managed to fill up the tank completely and the fuel gauge indicating accordingly. Which at least saves me the problem of figuring out where the wires to the fuel gauge level are.

Below the Jaguar Technical Bulletin. I am going to do a bit more fiddling with the recovery system. Although not mentioned here, I am going to try and see it I can find a way to check the canister purge valve. If worse comes to the worse I might consider changing out the charcoal cannister. Difficult job under the car. Also these charcoal canisters donít come cheap! Also, I think checking the check valve might be an idea. But again, a huge job I am not looking forward to. Also, I have yet to find anybody on the Jaguar forums that has managed to solve this problem. Many owners report this problem, some have replaced just about everything, but are still suffering from this annoying problem. So itís a bit of a mystery. I will talk to my jaguar specialist Raymond next time I see him. See what he thinks.

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-jaguar-premature-shut-off-12.jpeg

My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Spider-jaguar-premature-shut-off-12-1.jpeg

To be continued

Jeroen

Last edited by Jeroen : 22nd August 2022 at 13:19.
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Old 23rd August 2022, 12:59   #958
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Re: My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Sp

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Originally Posted by Jeroen View Post
That instrument is a tube or valve tester. Your dad would like it!
Electron Valves/Tubes belong to a bygone era. I had replaced many Valves in an ancient Grundig spool Recorder of 1960 era. A couple of decades ago, I used to repair rare electronics equipment. Tubes consumed plenty of power, had a short life (less than 100 - 1000 hours) and vented heat to the ambience. Except for the CRT - used in the TVs, tubes had been relegated to history. You don't see many Cathode Ray Tube (Picture tube) TVs/Monitors after 2000.


Quote:
Petrol nozzle cut off on release of vacuum created inside the venturi build in the nozzle.
HMG! I didn't know a simple petrol nozzle has so much of mechanical technology.

Your posts are becoming a compendium of information. Thank you.
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Old 23rd August 2022, 13:21   #959
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Re: My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Sp

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Woww what a market. I would have surely grabbed this tube checker. This would have made me to some extent self reliant and confident while buying individual or unmatched tube pairs from ebay sellers especially for rare tubes. Excellent visit and keep sharing more thank you.
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Old 23rd August 2022, 14:10   #960
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Re: My Car Hobby: A lot of fiddling, and some driving too! Jaguar XJR, Mercedes W123 & Alfa Romeo Sp

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeroen View Post
Petrol nozzle cut off on release of vacuum created inside the venturi build in the nozzle. Here is a nice video explaining it.
Thanks. I had no idea how that worked!
Quote:
My Jaguar has a so called ORVR system. (On board Refueling Vapour Recovery). Most modern cars will have something similar. It prevents fuel vapour being vented into the atmosphere directly whilst refuelling.

Have a look at the system description
Whoa! And here's me thinking that it's just a tank with filler pipe and cap

Infinitely more complex than I ever imagined.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prowler View Post
Electron Valves/Tubes belong to a bygone era.
According to many, many audiophiles, it is far from bygone. I'm sure you are aware that "tube" amps, even for headphones, a de rigueur to many, and solid state is thought of as inferior.

Not a bandwagon I ever climbed on. Tubes were the stuff of my childhood, when the TV took an age to warm up, and the Radiogram was so often out of order because a replacement "valve" (in UK) was awaited.

Quote:
HMG! I didn't know a simple petrol nozzle has so much of mechanical technology.
Me neither!
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