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Old 21st May 2020, 09:34   #1
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Default Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla

What I like:

Amazing value for money as a used buy
A well engineered all-rounder that's very easy to drive
Superlative reliability and longevity. Likely to last my lifetime and more
Spacious interiors and large accommodating boot
Fantastic low end performance. Very quick off the blocks
Safety package includes 2 airbags, ABS, all-wheel disc brakes etc.
Pleasant interiors. Ingress & egress are easy for all

What I don't:

Hydraulic steering is heavy at city speeds and light at high speeds
Missing kit - auto-dimming IRVM, rear air-con vents, rear foglamp, USB port, steering reach adjustment etc.
Bland, "get-lost-in-the-crowd" look
Petrol engine gets noisy and harsh at high revvs
Cost of spare parts is rather high for such an old car
Notchy gearbox is uncharacteristic of a Japanese car
Lacks the solid build of a European car

Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-1.jpg

Last edited by Aditya : 21st May 2020 at 09:36.
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Old 21st May 2020, 09:35   #2
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When it comes to purchasing a car, I always go for a used one. For me, the one and only reason for this is that you can get a lot more car for your money. Lots of good and well-equipped cars from higher segments are waiting to be picked up for what was the price of a new Tata Nano. There's no need to block a whole load of money. Let me start with my Mitsubishi Lancer. My Contessa was almost 15 years old and had started giving trouble with parts failing every three months or so. With a lot of work in my hand, I had no time to keep chasing mechanics or even go through the process of having it re-registered. So, I looked for a car to replace it.

The Lancer was a car that I had admired. It had good looks, low seating (like my Contessa), acceptable performance and great handling. Going through online listings, talking to friends and dealers, I realized that good (albeit old) examples were going for bargain prices (~ Rs. 1.5 lakhs). So, I started looking around for one. I checked out ~ 10 cars – all petrol but different variants and finally, after a good six months of hunting, found a pearl green GLXi. Patience is the name of the game. You’ll come across many cars – some will be priced above your budget, some under. But, to find a sound vehicle, at an acceptable price, it can take a long time. Be prepared to wait it out and if a fine example comes along, be ready to shell out a little more than you had planned. Trust me, it’s totally worth it.

Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-48.jpg

Run about 25,000 km, it was in good shape and after a fairly long drive, I was sure, this was the car that had to come home. The lady dealer I got it from was asking for Rs. 1.80 lakhs. I am not great at bargaining. Even so, I managed to get the price down to Rs. 1.70 lakhs, including transfer charges and complimentary comprehensive insurance. All I did was put Rs. 10,000 down on the table asking her to block the vehicle for me. What really impressed me was that the dealer followed up twice to inquire that everything was fine with the car. She even reminded me to renew my insurance when it was nearing the expiry date for the next two years. This was a truly good experience.

The car served me well for a good six years before my changing needs and preferences got me to move on.

Last edited by Aditya : 21st May 2020 at 20:02.
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Old 21st May 2020, 09:35   #3
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The decision:

The Lancer was a great car. However, in late 2014, some reasons compelled me to think of some other cars. The Lancer’s seats and roof were very low. My old dad was finding it difficult to get in and out of the car. He was fine with my brother’s second-gen Honda City, but really struggled in the Lancer. Besides, I have just one parking space in my building. So, I could not retain my Lancer and get another car. The Lancer just had to go. I started thinking about the ideal car for me.

Two cars that were initially on my list were the Fiat Linea (T-Jet) and the (failed?) second-gen Ford Fiesta 1.6. As usual, I took my time in checking out cars and deciding. But, both these cars are fairly rare. No good example of either of these cars was available in my budget of Rs. 2.5 lakhs and neither was exactly spacious on the inside. Besides, reliability was of utmost importance to me and neither of these cars was the last word in reliability. So, I dropped them from my list.

Two new and strong contenders entered the fray – the Honda Civic and the Toyota Corolla. Both these cars were legendary and both had sold in good numbers. However, both were very different from each other. The Civic was an enthusiast’s car, while the Corolla was a family man’s car. The Civic looked modern and dashing, while the Corolla was sedate. In fact, the only thing these two Japanese cars had in common was superlative reliability. The enthusiast in me liked the Civic’s sports car-like low seating, but the family man preferred the Corolla’s higher seats and roof. I was close to 40 then. I decided to leave out the fun-to-drive factor and opt for the family sedan.

I saw many examples of both, the Civic as well as the Corolla. There were even some Accords available in my budget, but the car’s size was a put-off. A daily driver cannot be very unwieldy. A good five months of hunting and I came across a 2006 golden Corolla with 42,000 km on the odo at a dealer in Andheri. The asking price was Rs. 3 lakhs, which was well over my budget and I am not a fan of gold, but the car was in very good shape. There was no work needed on the body or on the inside. The engine and other running gear were in tip-top condition. It was a 1.8E and had all the equipment that I wanted – alloy wheels, climate control, height adjustable driver seat, ABS and airbags. Mix that with practicality and the longevity that Toyotas are famous for and you have a perfect family car. Just like the Lancer, I knew this was the car that I had to take home.

Dealership Experience:

Once again the dealership experience here was good. I have nothing to complain about. The dealer was patient and courteous. When I informed him that it would be late in the evening that I could come to check out the car or talk about it, he did not hesitate to wait for me. I took my time with the car (six visits in total), but never pushed me to hurry up. He was always polite and helpful. After a little bit of negotiating, I managed to get the price down to Rs. 2.85 lakhs (including transfer charges) and instantly paid a token amount of Rs. 15,000. I had to attend to other matters for a while and as a result, be away from the city. The dealer kept the car with him for the period without complaining. He just made a reminder call to me once. A few weeks later, in April 2015, I paid the balance amount and took the car home. The whole transaction was very smooth. Even while taking delivery, there was no unnecessary time-wasting anywhere. The car was washed and kept ready for me before my reaching the dealership. They just took the necessary signatures and a customary photograph and after a quick final check, I was on my way.

The dealer took care of the transfer and within a month, I had the necessary documents in my hand. The car had third-party insurance. I got it comprehensively insured through a friend (and fellow BHPian). While there were no follow up calls like in the case of my Lancer, overall, I can sum the dealership experience as good. In fact, a family member was looking for a used Dzire. I referred him to the same dealer and he managed to get a good car at a decent price.

On the Outside:

The Corolla is sedate looking car. It is fairly big, but because most will find its design boring, it's the sort of car that will get lost in a crowd. The 15" alloy wheels shod with 195/60 section tyres do not fill the large wheel arches and look rather small for the sheet metal on top. Then there's a health dose of chrome at the front, rear and on the sides (door handles), which I am not a fan of. Overall, I do not think the Corolla is a great looking car. A buddy of mine calls it a soap box on wheels.

Fit and finish were good for its time and panel gaps are consistent. Till date, the doors close smoothly, without any problem. Build quality is not as strong as German cars. There is a some flex in the metal when you press it with your thumb. That said, the doors, boot lid and bonnet have a fair deal of weight to them and are far from flimsy.

Rather bland looking front end. The golden colour makes it even more boring:
Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-2.jpg

Rear is a lot more interesting to look at than the front. Note - the stickers on the bumper were use to cover up the first two scratches that the car received under my ownership. After that, I just gave up:
Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-3.jpg

One of the best angles to view the Corolla from. While uninteresting to look at, the front and rear of the car gel well:
Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-4.jpg

15" alloy wheels shod with 195/60 section rubber appear very small for the car. Disc brakes at the rear are a welcome feature:
Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-5.jpg

Last edited by Aditya : 21st May 2020 at 13:02.
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Old 21st May 2020, 09:35   #4
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On the Inside - Front:

While I am not a fan of the Corolla's exterior, I find the interiors a delight. They are very practical. The beige and grey dashboard, the light beige roofliner and beige seats makes the interior feel airy. Soft touch material is used at various places and faux wood inserts on the center fascia and doorpads gives it an upmarket appearance. Just about everything you touch feels built to last and last it does. Even today (14 years after the car was built) each switch feels just as good as it does in a new car. It's only the leather wrapping on the gear knob that has aged. That said, everything in the car is functioning as intended. The ergonomics are spot on as well. All switches and buttons are easy to reach and just where you'd expect them to be.

Criticism? The beige bits get soiled easily:
Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-6.jpg

Leather wrapped steering wheel is not as thick as I'd like. No contours for your thumbs or audio control buttons provided. To be honest, I don't miss either of those features. What I would have liked is reach adjustment for the steering wheel:
Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-7.jpg

Key ring is illuminated:
Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-13.jpg

Simple and clear instrument cluster. Revv-counter on the left, large speedometer in the middle and analogue temperature and fuel gauges on the right. The white dials and red needles make it easy to read. There's a generic door open warning in the instrument cluster for all the doors:
Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-8.jpg

Single line MID at the base of the speedometer shows the odo reading...
Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-9.jpg

...and two trip meters:
Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-10.jpg

Seems like less information, but honestly, I don't miss anything:
Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-11.jpg

Switches for the adjustment of ORVMs are located on the dashboard and not on the doorpad. They are still within easy reach and easy to operate:
Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-12.jpg

There is a small coin holder as well:
Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-14.jpg

A storage bin is located below:
Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-15.jpg

OBD port is placed next to the bonnet release:
Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-16.jpg

Well spaced out A, B & C pedals. A large and usable dead pedal is provided:
Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-17.jpg

Doorpads have soft cloth insert at the top and a faux wood insert on the armrest. The front speakers are housed in the doorpads. A puddle lamp is located below:
Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-18.jpg

Tweeters are located at the top:
Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-31.jpg

Slim door pockets cannot hold much. No cupholders here:
Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-19.jpg

Velour upholstered seats have enough firmness and are supportive even on long drives. Headrests are adjustable, but not soft. A useful armrest is located in the middle:
Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-20.jpg

Driver's seat gets height...
Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-21.jpg

...and lumber adjustments:
Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-22.jpg

Adjustable seatbelts:
Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-23.jpg

Center fascia holds a six CD changer and cassette player at the top, a clock, and the climate control display & switches. The air-con's performance is satisfactory. However, with time, the cooling efficiency has dipped. Even so, it is still adequate most of the time:
Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-24.jpg

IRVM is not auto-dimming. It has a flick switch to toggle between day and night modes:
Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-25.jpg

A deep storage space has been provided. It no longer stays closed on its own. But hey, there's nothing a bit of double-sided sticking plaster can't solve:
Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-26.jpg

Ashtray with a green illumination lamp. A cigarette lighter is provided below:
Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-27.jpg

Center console has a flap which opens up to reveal a storage space. This can be used as cupholders for the front seats' occupants. The plastic partitions can be removed to accommodate long objects:
Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-28.jpg

Center armrest has two storage bins under it. The upper one is a shallow compartment, which can hold your sunglasses and pens:
Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-29.jpg

The lower bin is deep and can accommodate much larger objects such as CDs:
Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-30.jpg

Both sunvisors have ticket holders...
Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-40.jpg

...and mirrors with covers. No illumination provided though:
Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-41.jpg

Glovebox can hold a decent amount of stuff. However, it has no compartments or a light or cooling function:
Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-42.jpg

Last edited by Aditya : 21st May 2020 at 12:09.
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Old 21st May 2020, 09:35   #5
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On the Inside - Rear

Rear doors open wide. Doorpads have the same colour and design theme as the front. However, there are no door pockets. The rear speakers aren't here either. The roof is high for a sedan and the floor is low. The rear seat is placed at a comfortable height. Nobody - young or old will have a problem getting in or out of the rear:
Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-32.jpg

Rear seat is contoured, but spacious enough to carry 3 average sized adults. There is enough under-thigh support as well and the backrest angle is comfortable. Legroom is adequate, but a car of this size could do better - just look at the current-gen Honda City or Maruti Ciaz. The seats are not excessively soft. While three seatbelts have been provided, only the passengers on the sides get headrests. These are adjustable, but firm. A center armrest has been provided. It is wide and usable and houses a couple of cupholders:
Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-33.jpg

Backrest can be folded down. It is split in a 60:40 configuration - very handy while carrying long objects in the boot:
Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-34.jpg

Both front seats have wide and deep seatback pockets for the rear passengers to use:
Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-35.jpg

No rear air-con vents. This is one feature that I miss. With a child seat in place for my 2-year old daughter, my better half prefers to sit next to the little one in the rear. With the air-con's power diminishing with age, rear air-con vents would have helped matters. On very hot days, I have heard her complain. All we get is an ashtray - useless as no one in the family smokes. The floor hump is pretty tall and prominent, which means the middle passenger has to place his feet on either side of it to sit comfortably:
Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-36.jpg

Fixed grab handles without any coat hooks. Remember to carry a hanger for your blazer if you are carrying one:
Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-37.jpg

Light beige roofliner shows no sign of ageing or coming off. More evidence of Toyota's quality and longevity:
Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-39.jpg

Parcel tray is huge. Rear speakers are located on it. Boy, this is an old car!
Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-46.jpg

The entire boot is carpeted. Loading lip is not very low, but the opening is big. Boot space is huge and practical. I have never been embarrassed on airport runs. However big the bags, they have been swallowed up well by the Corolla's boot. In fact, folding the backrests of the rear seat down, I have even managed to slide my bicycle in. This is one usable boot!
Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-43.jpg

Boot lamp provided. Underside is unclad and very unpleasant to look at and doesn't even get a proper coat of paint:
Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-44.jpg

Underside of the boot lid is not clad either. Today, even some lower segment cars get a cladding here:
Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-45.jpg

Last edited by Aditya : 21st May 2020 at 20:40.
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Old 21st May 2020, 09:35   #6
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Forgive the dirty engine bay. Servicing is long overdue and since the lockdown is in place, I can't do much:
Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla-img_20200517_145214.jpg

Driving the Corolla in the City:

The Corolla is powered by a 1.8L, 4-cylinder, 16-valve petrol engine with variable valve timing. The motor has produces 125 BHP and 157 Nm and is mated to a 5-speed manual transmission.

The engine is barely audible at idle and on the move too, its refinement is good. The Corolla rolls off from a standstill in a clean manner. What is immediately noticeable is the low end torque. This makes the car quick off the blocks. If you are interested, it can hit 100 km/h from a standstill in a claimed sub-10 second time. The low end torque means driveability is fantastic. You can easily pull away from even under 1,000 rpm in 4th gear. Power delivery is quite linear making the drive smooth. On the move, you'll be happy in the city because the Corolla doesn't need downshifts even if you need to close a gap in the traffic quickly. The car can even cruise at 50 km/h in 4th gear without missing a beat.

The car's clutch is light and has a short travel range. The gearshift, however, is not the smoothest and feels notchy. Still, one can live with it. The car's all-round visibility is very good and turning radius is tight. The only real fly in the ointment is the steering. It is a hydraulic unit and not very light at slow and parking speeds. This is the only thing that keeps me from saying that the Corolla is the ideal city sedan.

The Corolla comes with disc brakes all-round. Stopping distances are short. The brake feel is good as well.

Coming to NVH, there is a very mild body shake on start-up, but it's nothing to complain about. Overall insulation is good and very little noise comes into the cabin at city speeds.

Fuel efficiency is not a strong point of the Corolla. In Mumbai, with all its traffic and the air-con running most of the time, the car delivers ~ 9 km/l.

The ride at city speeds is very absorbent. I've heard complaints about the Corolla's ride being harsh and choppy. However, I haven't experienced anything like that. This car appears to handle city roads pretty well. Even broken surfaces don't affect the ride. Large potholes do make their presence felt from time to time though. The ground clearance is pretty high and I have had no problems dealing with high speed breakers even with a full load of passengers + luggage in the car.

Driving the Corolla on the Highway:

On the open road, as you would've guessed with almost 125 BHP on tap, the acceleration is impressive. However, the mid-range is fair and the top-end is poor. Revv the motor too hard and the refinement goes for a toss. The engine sounds rough, which has made me give up redlining it. Anyway, there is no need to redline it. The car can be a brisk highway cruiser. Driveability is good on the expressway as well and you won't find the need to downshift often. There is enough power on offer to get up past slower vehicles without breaking a sweat. Even up a climb when you need to pass slow moving vehicles or on undivided highways, you will rarely find the need to drop a gear.

The cabin is nice and quiet at lower three digit speeds. Very little engine, wind or road noise filters through. It is only when you go well above those speeds that the cabin can become noisy.

Coming to the topic of fuel efficiency, I have managed to get an average of 15 km/l on many of my drives. This is not bad for a 1.8L petrol.

The high speed stability of the Corolla is quite acceptable. It's no Jetta or Octavia, but that does not mean that it loses composure over bumps and joints. The ride at higher speeds is not bad either. What is not good is that the steering becomes too light at very high speeds. This can make one lose a bit of confidence.

When it comes to taking corners at high speeds, there is some body roll, but it's controlled and in general, the Corolla changes direction fairly well. It's just that there is very little feedback from the steering, which may not allow enthusiasts to take a corner as aggressively as say in a Ford.

The brakes perform as expected and stop the car well from any speed. The ABS ensures that there is no drama involved.

Maintenance till date:

The car is service at an FNG once in a year. Service costs average ~ Rs. 3,500. I had the brake pads replaced at 50,000 km. The tyres were changed around the same time as well. Both these components that came with car might have had some life left in them, but I did not want to take a chance with them. I've had the suspension, steering and other components checked, but haven't had to replace any part as yet. Other parts that have been changed are the horn (which gave up in December 2019) and the wiper blades.

Mishaps:

Apart from the regular scratches left by idlers and lovebirds, there have been three accidents. The first one was when I was waiting in a traffic jam. A scooter weaving his way through the jam got his left foot peg stuck in the right foglamp housing of my car’s front bumper. This caused a big tear in it which later resulted in a gaping hole, dislodging the foglamp in the process. A new bumper would set me back by quite a bit, but my FNG took one off a donor car, had it painted and fitted it. The entire process took a while, but cost just a fraction of what I’d have paid at an authorized workshop.

The second accident happened just at Cadell Road. I was crossing the main road when the traffic had stopped. A guy on a Karizma in all his wisdom decided to come at great speed from the right. Both, he and I were blind-sided due to a bus. It resulted in his bike hitting my car’s front right panel, just above the wheel. The damage was quite heavy. In the coming week, I had it fixed at fellow BHPian, noelnelly’s workshop. As expected, he did a stellar, yet wallet-friendly job. After this incident, fellow BHPian ChiragM has started started calling the car a bike-magnet!

The third incident happened while the car was standing in my parking space inside my building. A small rock fell from the 15th floor and caused a crack in the top-left corner of the front windshield. I haven’t had that fixed since the damage is negligible.

Conclusion:

The Corolla has been everything I wanted it to be – an extremely reliable and steady family sedan with low maintenance costs. The way the car is going, it certainly looks like it will outlast me. It will never stand out in a crowd, but then, it never feels out of place anywhere you take it either.

Coming to the topic of used cars, I will reiterate that unless one is a tearing hurry, one should have a look at the used car market. You will always find some delicious deals. For a pretty low amount of money, you can get something that’s bigger, faster, more comfortable and safer - a lot more value for money. And if you want reliability, Jap’s the way!

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Old 21st May 2020, 09:43   #7
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Old 21st May 2020, 10:41   #8
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Extremely detailed write up there, Aditya.

I lay claim to be the uncrowned master of Corollas ( ) and am a great fan of this car, having owned two and maintained many many more since 2010.

You can easily get an auto-dimming IRVM done; several DIYs on the forum for reference.

Yours is a H2 variant; the H5 would have got you auto headlights, steering controls and lumbar support in the driver seat.

Spares are very reasonably priced in the open market; Toyota spares would be pricey - agreed.

The spring action on the flap is lost because the dash must have been opened for something and the spring must have got lost/ spring mount must have broken.

It will be a good idea to get a cabin air filter for your AC( any equivalent size from Purolator would do). The H2 just has some mesh.

Adding my dual Corolla ownership thread for reference

https://www.team-bhp.com/forum/long-...rollas-mt.html (Old is Gold - Tale of Two Toyota Corollas - AT and MT)

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Old 21st May 2020, 10:49   #9
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Default Re: Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla

The best part is that - for someone who properly drives and evaluates all the newly launched cars in India, you rely on a beautifully maintained ~14-year-old gem.

63k kms is absolutely nothing on a Toyota and I'm sure it will run a lot many more!

The newer Corolla Altis still represents good value in the used car market. With the lockdown, I've been spending a lot more time on OLX, and the Corolla Altis came across as one of the most VFM options available. The resale value is similar to C segment sedans of the same usage, and most petrol examples have comparatively lesser kms on the odo as well. Moreover, Toyota U-trust also provides warranty and financing! A very safe option for those who want to take the pre-worshipped route.

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Old 21st May 2020, 11:53   #10
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Looks very clean inside and out. Do you guys in Mumbai not see any effects of the sea air on your vehicles? Does the salt in the air there not show any corrosion of parts/metals?

On the surface it looks surprisingly rust free. What was your assessment for underneath the body?
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Old 21st May 2020, 12:03   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Miyata View Post
Looks very clean inside and out. Do you guys in Mumbai not see any effects of the sea air on your vehicles? Does the salt in the air there not show any corrosion of parts/metals?

On the surface it looks surprisingly rust free. What was your assessment for underneath the body?
By and large, the body and undercarriage are rust-free. However, at certain points, there are some signs of rust appearing - that is expected as I live right next to the sea. Old cars like the Ambassador, Padmini and 118NE used to need tin work every two years. The Marutis and even the Contessa were a lot better needing work after 8 years. Hondas, Mitsubishis and Toyotas last even longer before they need to visit a workshop for body work.
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Old 21st May 2020, 12:14   #12
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Default Re: Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla

That is a very detailed review of a great looking car Aditya. Many congratulations.

63000 kms is absolutely nothing on this car. I have owned a CR-V 2.4 AWD briefly, bought it when it was 12 years old and had done 53000 kms. It was such a wonderful car to own and I still regret selling it. I relocated to Gurgaon thereafter and started hunting for a clean pre-owned Corolla Altis. There were plenty of examples in the pre-owned market but I didn't come across a single car that was clean and immaculately kept. Your car looks beautiful inside out. Only thing I am personally not fond of are those suede finish seat covers but maybe I am nitpicking.

You also may explore some better looking registration plates, maybe gel plates. Those might enhance the look of the car further !
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Old 21st May 2020, 15:19   #13
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Default Re: Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aditya View Post

Criticism? The beige bits get soiled easily:


Leather wrapped steering wheel is not as thick as I'd like.
On the beige lower dashboard - use wet wipes of any brand and wipe the dirt off - dirt gets trapped in the fine grains on the plastic

Steering wheel - please install a steering cover and see the difference in how meaty it is to hold

The Toyota red/ pink long life coolant is fit for 1.6 lakh kms . However, I've seen countless owners fall prey to FNG "goli" to have the coolant changed to the glycol based green stuff. Please don't get it changed.

Your rear Windows will start getting sticky - just have the glass removed and rubber washed, dried, conditioned (with Waxpol vinyl polish OR any cream) and it will work perfect. The window motors are DENSO and last really long without maintenance.

By now you must have gotten used to the longish bonnet; need to be careful in tight traffic where kissing the car ahead is a strong possibility.
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Old 21st May 2020, 15:44   #14
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Default Re: Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla

5 stars for a private ownership thread also @Aditya!

If you ask me - the piece you have is the best looking Corolla design. I didn't like those before it much & I honestly hate the Altis onwards versions. This one looks neat. Clean, understated. It doesn't try to be flashy to stand out. Those who know what it is - will see it in the crowd too and admire it. That's the type of cars I like.

Nothing like a nice large engine. No technical advancements can directly replace displacement & that 1.8 VVTi is a proof of that. Nothing brings low end power and torque like displacement does.
Any plans for the head unit to be replaced with something with the times? You know with Android Auto / Apple car play to help navigation etc?

One little thing I like about such well designed and thought out cars is how the seat base & back extends into the car body on the sides. That way the side passenger gets full soft support right to the door even if there are 3 people in the back seat. Neat little thing.

Man it hurt to read about the accidents. I hope those are the last of them ever for you. Wishing you so many more safe & happy miles with the beautiful & comfortable car!

P.S. - Please add a picture of yourself in the back seat at your earliest convenience .
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Old 21st May 2020, 17:47   #15
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Default Re: Buying a 9-year old value-for-money sedan : My 2006 Toyota Corolla

Congrats @Aditya. That old girl looks good. I have owned 2 Toyota Corollas (the 2006 Corolla H5 in pearl white and the 2008 Altis) for a period of over 14 years now and still ongoing. Sad to see TKM discontinued it. Maybe they'll be back with a hybrid.

This is one car I have grown to trust and dare I say even love despite all its little quirks. My cars are sparingly used but *very* well maintained, no expense spared. I had put the Altis up on sale last year but changed my mind later and decided to keep it. With TKM's excellent after service and support you won't regret the experience.

Cheers!
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