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Old 5th November 2015, 22:44   #1
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Default Motorsport Engineering: Which country should I pick?

Hey Guys,
Im thinking of applying for uk and usa universities for a degree in motorsports engineering. What i want to know is that which country is better and has better job security? I also need some advice on how to pursue motorsports as i am very passionate about the sport. Any advice would be helpful
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Old 5th November 2015, 23:37   #2
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Default re: Motorsport Engineering: Which country should I pick?

I would say Germany but i have no valid data points to back up that claim. To me its lot of engineering and there is no better place to master it than Germany.

And knowing that language definitely helps to find suitable positions.

The last place i would do anything in Motorsports engineering is in US but again thats a personal take.
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Old 6th November 2015, 01:36   #3
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Default Which country to pursue a career in motorsports?

Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkDragonChaos View Post
Hey Guys,

Im thinking of applying for uk and usa universities for a degree in motorsports engineering. What i want to know is that which country is better and has better job security? I also need some advice on how to pursue motorsports as i am very passionate about the sport. Any advice would be helpful

I think UK should be your best bet seeing how almost all the big Formula1 teams are based there. And I remember reading somewhere that they do have some big university encompassing it in their curriculum.
Also, I remember this topic being covered elsewhere on the forum. Try looking it up.
All the best for your career ahead! Godspeed.

Last edited by shyn : 6th November 2015 at 01:38.
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Old 7th November 2015, 13:43   #4
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Default re: Motorsport Engineering: Which country should I pick?

Thanks. But I also want to know the job opportunities for immigrants after completing your masters there.
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Old 9th November 2015, 12:17   #5
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Default Re: Motorsport Engineering: Which country should I pick?

UK - That's it.

UK is where you'll have the most course options, as well as the most practical opportunities.

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Originally Posted by VW2010 View Post
I would say Germany but i have no valid data points to back up that claim. To me its lot of engineering and there is no better place to master it than Germany.
Germany is better for a Masters in Engineering than a Bachelors. And they do have lots of programs in English now.

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Originally Posted by DarkDragonChaos View Post
Thanks. But I also want to know the job opportunities for immigrants after completing your masters there.
Honestly, the opportunities for motorsport engineering in ANY country will be very poor / challenging. Be prepared to work hard to get a placement and your salary will be peanuts when starting off too. It's a long, uphill climb. Not trying to discourage you, but only those with true passion & skill make a decent living in motorsport.

What I'd recommend to you instead is automobile engineering (again, UK has excellent programs). With automobile engineering too, you can enter the motorsports field. However, auto engineering will also give you a good shot at placements within car companies (more jobs + more money). Someone I know graduated from Coventry UK and landed a fairly good position with Toyota Belgium in just his 2nd year of working.
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Old 9th November 2015, 13:59   #6
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Default Re: Motorsport Engineering: Which country should I pick?

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Any advice would be helpful
Though they are not directly related to your question, you might find some clues in these threads:

http://www.team-bhp.com/forum/indian...-industry.html

http://www.team-bhp.com/forum/indian...ve-career.html

http://www.team-bhp.com/forum/shifti...ce-thread.html

Cheers,
Vikram
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Old 6th April 2016, 16:35   #7
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Default Re: Motorsport Engineering: Which country should I pick?

Hello Vikram, my son is studying motorsport engineering BSc at Stafford University. I live in Birmingham where Birmingham City University (BCU) also do the same course no doubt there are other universities offering the same. I would say that Birmingham City University (not to be confused with Birmingham University) have the slight edge.
My son couldn't get into BCU (left it too late) but if you are interested I can help point you in the right direction, I also did a diploma in automotive engineering from the same university (BCU).
I can say that Birmingham has a vibrant Indian community and is a great place to stay and study (lived here most of my life). As for the other countries I know there isn't much F1 work out there other that in the UK but I don't know much about their educational offerings – look into it contact the various engineering faculties.
Regarding Jobs it is very hard to be able to break into the motorsport industry but with good skills and knowledge it should be possible, don't forget your skills are transferable. I know student job prospects in England aren't great but you can get limited work – check for yourself as my knowledge on this subject is most likely out of date.
I hope all this helps, but the best person to decide how and where you want to pursue your ambitions and career is you. If I can help any further please let me know and I will assist the best I can.
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Old 6th April 2016, 17:42   #8
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Default Re: Motorsport Engineering: Which country should I pick?

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Originally Posted by DarkDragonChaos View Post
Hey Guys,
Im thinking of applying for uk and usa universities for a degree in motorsports engineering. What i want to know is that which country is better and has better job security? I also need some advice on how to pursue motorsports as i am very passionate about the sport. Any advice would be helpful
UK yes for the courses BUT DEFINITELY UK NO for your career.

There is no post study work visa, you will complete your course and will have to leave, unless of course someone offered you a job for which they are going to sponsor you as well as pay you 35 thousand pounds salary right from the start (Highly unlikely)

How do I know this? I am a BE in Automotive Engineering from Coventry University with a Hons and 2:1 (Some companies ask for a 2:2 and very few a 2:1) and an MBA in Engineering Management also from Coventry University with a Distinction ( Most companies ask for a Merit to let you get in, a Distinction in a class of 100, say 5 will get)

So with the 2:1 and a Distinction, where did my life come to ? Back to India because of the lack of PSW. Why did I go to UK then you ask ? I got to know of them shutting the PSW in April 2012, I graduated in November 2012, in between my course, I could not leave.

Go anywhere but not UK, you will want to work after your course to get the much needed experience and with the lack of PSW, highly unlikely you will land a placement, on the other hand companies in India without you having a campus in India, won't entertain you much, actually wont entertain you at all, been there, done that, I work for a Netflix like company in India now, my dreams were just like yours.

Last edited by humyum : 6th April 2016 at 17:43.
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Old 23rd August 2019, 06:48   #9
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Default Re: Motorsport Engineering: Which country should I pick?

This is an interesting website I came across, and thought I'd post the contents here, for posterity, in case there was some interest going forward ...

https://www.schoolofraceengineering....dQVuxc20fStknU

MIA School of Race Engineering winner announced!
August 16, 2019

For the first time ever, the MIA School of Race Engineering ran an exclusive competition at Formula Student UK, offering students the chance of winning a FREE place on the November 2019 course!

To enter the competition, students simply had to scan a QR code and fill in an online form detailing their engineering experiences/qualifications to date. After receiving an impressive number of entries, a name was drawn from a hat and the winner of this year’s MIA School of Race Engineering competition is…

Andrew Steel!

Andrew has a BSc in Physics and a Masters in Aerospace Engineering. He has spent two years working at Jaguar Land Rover as an engineer which included a six-month placement at the Panasonic Jaguar Racing Formula E team.

We are looking forward to welcoming Andrew onto this year’s course which will take place on the 2nd - 3rd and 9th - 10th of November. Students will be taught by real-world Race Engineers from F1, WEC, Formula E, DTM and F3. These tutors will cover topics such as strategy, tyres, vehicle dynamics, car set-up and much more, all within a relaxed and friendly learning environment.

Students will also get the opportunity to take part in our unique interactive simulator session at Cranfield Simulation, here they will work with a professional Race Engineer and Driver to optimise the set-up of an F1-style simulator.

The course is taught at a variety of exciting motorsport venues which have included the likes of SportPesa Racing Point F1 Team and Silverstone. Students will also get to attend two networking dinners where they will be joined by the tutors and other motorsport guests.

Would you like to be part of the next generation of Race Engineers?

Apply now to guarantee your place!
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Old 12th September 2019, 21:44   #10
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Default Re: Motorsport Engineering: Which country should I pick?

Quote:
Originally Posted by humyum View Post
UK yes for the courses BUT DEFINITELY UK NO for your career.

There is no post study work visa, you will complete your course and will have to leave, unless of course someone offered you a job for which they are going to sponsor you as well as pay you 35 thousand pounds salary right from the start (Highly unlikely)

How do I know this? I am a BE in Automotive Engineering from Coventry University with a Hons and 2:1 (Some companies ask for a 2:2 and very few a 2:1) and an MBA in Engineering Management also from Coventry University with a Distinction ( Most companies ask for a Merit to let you get in, a Distinction in a class of 100, say 5 will get)

So with the 2:1 and a Distinction, where did my life come to ? Back to India because of the lack of PSW. Why did I go to UK then you ask ? I got to know of them shutting the PSW in April 2012, I graduated in November 2012, in between my course, I could not leave.

Go anywhere but not UK, you will want to work after your course to get the much needed experience and with the lack of PSW, highly unlikely you will land a placement, on the other hand companies in India without you having a campus in India, won't entertain you much, actually wont entertain you at all, been there, done that, I work for a Netflix like company in India now, my dreams were just like yours.
Things seem to have changed, regarding staying back in the UK after your degree and working ...

https://www.cranfield.ac.uk/press/ne...Lvkaus9jsGqFRA

Cranfield welcomes Government proposals to extend international students' post-study visas
Published 11 Sep 2019
Press release number PR-CORP-19-114

Cranfield University welcomes Government proposals announced today (11 September) to extend the period of time international students can remain in the UK after their studies to two years.

The Home Office has announced plans to reverse the decision made in 2012 by then-Home Secretary Theresa May that currently forces overseas students to leave the UK four months after finishing their degree, if they have not found a job.

Professor Simon Pollard, Pro-Vice-Chancellor for International Partnerships and Student Recruitment, said: “This announcement is highly welcome. Cranfield recruits high quality international students, many on prestigious scholarships who – as part of their preparations for global citizenship – routinely express the wish to work in the UK.

“We will be augmenting our student support to provide these career-enhancing opportunities for our learners when they graduate.”

In 2018, there were around 450,000 international students studying in the UK.

If implemented, the change in post-study visa will apply to students who start courses at undergraduate level or above from 2020 onwards.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson said the change would see students “unlock their potential” and begin careers in the UK.

Responding to the announcement, the Chief Executive of Universities UK, Alistair Jarvis, said: “This is very positive news. Evidence shows that international students bring significant positive social outcomes to the UK as well as £26 billion in economic contributions, but for too long the lack of post-study work opportunities in the UK has put us at a competitive disadvantage in attracting those students.

“The introduction of a two-year post-study work visa is something Universities UK has long campaigned for and we strongly welcome this policy change, which will put us back where we belong as a first choice study destination. Not only will a wide range of employers now benefit from access to talented graduates from around the world, these students hold lifelong links with the UK with a recent study showing 77% of graduates want to retain business links with us and 88% would return for tourism.”
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Old 6th August 2020, 01:32   #11
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Default Re: Motorsport Engineering: Which country should I pick?

To keep this thread as a resource for students interested in pursuing a formal education in motorsport engineering, here is another website where information on courses can be found :

https://www.jumpstart-jobs.com/master_degree

Cheers,

FourWheelDrift
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Old 17th October 2020, 05:11   #12
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Default Re: Motorsport Engineering: Which country should I pick?

While the world of F1 revolves around the cars and their drivers, with team radio becoming so freely aired, a lot of us are exposed to the race engineers speaking with their drivers.

Here's the path Pierre Hamelin, race engineer of Daniil Kvyat, took from engineering college onwards, to get to where he is :

Please click on http://en.kvyat.com/news/interview-hamelin-story for the below interview, with visuals.

INTERVIEW
Pierre Hamelin, race engineer of Daniil
On his F1 career and working alongside Kvyat in Toro Rosso

Race engineer is one of the key figures in a Formula 1 team. It's a person who works alongside the driver throughout the whole race weekend and whose decisions in many ways influence the results. It explains the fact that when changing teams, many drivers prefer to move together with their race engineers.

Frenchman Pierre Hamelin started working with Daniil Kvyat as his performance engineer in 2014 and became his race engineer in 2016. We've asked Pierre to shed light on his path to Formula 1, his relations with Daniil and his job.

Q. How come you became a Toro Rosso engineer?
A. When I was at University, we had a kind of championship with other students; it was an engineering championship. Just an engineering projects for Renault F1 team. It was long time ago, and I won that competition in France among the winners from other countries: it was a global challenge. Students had a chance to go to Renault F1 factory in Enstone to present their projects against other opponents. I did not win the overall competition, but I won a qualifier in France and got in touch with some people while being there. So I made some contacts, and there were some opportunities for an internship. So I got into Renault quite early. It was my first job after the University. I was 22, and I was really into F1, but until then I did not have any strong background in motor racing. So it started like that. I had a passion for it, and I was involved in a couple of other projects, like Formula Student and things like this.

Q. When you decided to study engineering, was it because you liked racing?
A. Yes, it was. I did not know that I would manage to make it to F1 eventually because I did not know a lot of people from this world. But I chose this direction having in mind a target to become an F1 engineer. And all circumstances made it happen.

I got to have an internship in research and development. From there I started to get promotions. I was interested in racing and going to the track, doing a bit of track testing, so I started to be involved a bit more during the winter tests and testing in general. I had to do a bit of sensor check, data analysis, and then I ended up at the race team as a junior engineer. I was not involved in working with the drivers, just staying at the factory and helping engineers do their everyday job. When they needed something, I was there to help, so I was trying my best.

Then there was Lotus and, then I moved to Toro Rosso 4 years ago to become Dany's performance engineer in 2014 season.

Q. Did you go to races before that?
A. I did go to the races, but I wasn't officially working on the car. Once I worked with Kimi Raikkonen when his performance engineer had a baby's birth, so I replaced him for one race. I did the job well as we got a podium. So fantastic, it was in Budapest! So, when I replaced him I was officially working on the car at one event, but generally, I was going to races more like a support engineer as I didn't have an assignment to one of the cars. When I got to Toro Rosso, I worked with Dany during the first year as a performance engineer. Then Dany left to Red Bull, and in 2015 I had the same role for Carlos. Then Max arrived at Toro Rosso, and the following year, when they had a switch with Dany, I became a race engineer for Kvyat. When Max left, there was a bit of rearrangement inside the engineering team, and I was offered a position of the race engineer. I knew Dany very well and did this job before in some test events, so I think my boss had trust that I could handle this job. That's how I ended up here.

Q. Was it something you aimed for?
A. Yes. It is something I was aiming for, and obviously, it happened much quicker than I expected, because of some circumstances, which is very good for me. I am very happy to be where I am now. But yeah, honestly when I started it was very tough because you have to learn very quickly, you obviously cannot afford to make any mistakes. I made some mistakes. It happens. And it came at a high price. When you make a mistake, it affects the performance, and it cost a lot of time to recover. So it was a bit up and downs. You make a mistake, and then you lose track time and then it affects the result. Basically, I ended up there a couple of times, but after a few races I was fully into the rhythm, and everything was going smoothly.

Q. What are the most important qualities for your position in the team?
A. I think the best comparison you can make is a chief of the orchestra. You have a big orchestra, where people do different things, and you have to be able not to manage each of them directly, but give them directions and do that at the same time for everyone. I'm not managing anyone especially, but when the car is on track or in the garage, you are managing it. You have to talk with mechanics, explain to them what you want to do, how you want to build the car in terms of setup, what you want to extract from the car. You have to talk with other engineers for the same topics. You have to talk with your driver as well. I think you have to be well organized and get along well with the people in the team. And you need a proper team spirit as well.

Q. What are the most important qualities for a driver?
A. I think he needs to be patient and very aware in understanding what is happening with the car. The driver needs patience because he's the centerpiece for a lot of people: everyone comes to him, regarding the tires, starts, strategy… There is a lot of topics he has to digest, understand and memorize as well, but he has to be a bit flexible because the situation is changing all the time. When it is getting windy the tires become more difficult to manage; when it is getting wet, the driver has to change his approach; when it comes to different compounds of tires, the driver has to drive differently. So I think flexibility is important and especially with the current car, it is something we are looking for. It is very very important.

Q. Do you have off track relationship? Is that important?
A. We are getting along with Dany pretty well; we keep in touch. But I must admit it's mostly due to our work. We try to spend some time off the track as well; we go to dinner sometimes. Or when we go to the simulator it is a bit of a different thing from being on track, but overall I'd say our relationship stay quite professional. We are rarely going to dinner together during a race weekend and doing that kind of things. It is a bit difficult because of our schedule.

Q. Is there a rivalry between the two sides of the garage?
A. There is no rivalry as such because first, you need to beat the other teams, to move further in the championship. But what is very important is that you can learn from the other car as you can easily compare yourself with it. So obviously you always end up being rivals. We try to iterate the fastest car possible on our side of the garage, so we mostly help each other. And then when it's qualifying time it's good to be in the front, but it is not an ultimate goal for us, no.

Q. How exciting is the fact that the middle of the pack is so close this year? Does it add extra pressure?
A. It is very difficult because every single thing matters. Decisions on tire usage, decisions when and where to go out on track. All these are very important, and it is very difficult to manage everything because there are so many people around us. What is difficult as well, is that there are some cars who can qualify to Q2 quite easily. This is the case for us on some circuits, but in Baku, for example, we were quite confident we would make it into Q2. There are also some tracks where it is more difficult, and already in Q1 the driver has to show all the speed we have, pushing hard and doing all he can because the timing is very important for us in Q1 already. Then you beat a bit of faster track in Q2 and you have a bit of a margin for improvement.

Q. Is it a dream job for you?
A. Yes, definitely. I enjoy it a lot! Traveling is something I really enjoy. Luckily my partner worked in F1 in the past, so she understands what I'm doing. Actually, when we met she was also working for a race team, so she knows what it takes to travel. She actually was a travel office manager for Renault, so she was organizing the flights, hotels all cars and taxis. Funny enough, when I was at Renault, we did not know each other, I met her later on one of the parties, which is quite funny. So her background is helping me a lot to be a bit more relaxed about family and social life. And otherwise, I think it is great. We visit many places around the world, meet a lot of people, go to great countries. I love it.

Q. What is the next dream?
A. Well, winning races would be good! I had a podium with Kimi, so it is one step closer. To get my first win with Toro Rosso would be great. Honestly, I am very happy with where I am now, I still have a lot to learn, and the team is growing quickly. OK, drivers are changing, our drivers have more experience, it gets better and better to work with them. Actually, better is the wrong word...You can approach the weekend differently, you can target different things, so it is very good now that we have such good drivers in the team now.
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Old 20th October 2020, 23:12   #13
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Default Re: Motorsport Engineering: Which country should I pick?

While I've referenced the www.motorsport.nda.ac.uk website in a previous post here https://www.team-bhp.com/forum/india...ml#post3841362 (A career in Motorsports industry!!!), they have recently revived communication, to stimulate interest.

https://motorsport.nda.ac.uk/news/ge...eering-part-1/

Quote:
Getting Started in Motorsport Engineering Part 1

In the first two parts of our Getting Started in Motorsport series, we looked at the highly competitive ambition of becoming a professional racing driver ( https://motorsport.nda.ac.uk/news/ge...ce-car-driver/ ) and embarking on a career in the commercial side of motorsport ( https://motorsport.nda.ac.uk/news/ge...of-motorsport/ ). This week, it is the turn of the subject most close to our hearts here at the NMA – motorsport engineering.

A career in motorsport engineering is exciting, challenging and incredibly fulfilling. As with all other areas of the industry, finding a job in the most exciting (in our opinion) end of motorsport will involve hard work, dedication and some sacrifice on your behalf. But think of the all the fun you will have when you get there!

This guide is for those of you who have some degree of experience already – the vehicle technicians, the graduates, the unqualified but skilled mechanics. We’ll get to the newbies, school leavers and apprentices in Part 2 later this week.

Here is the first part of our guide to Getting Started in Motorsport Engineering.
Quote:
“I have an engineering qualification but no real hands-on experience with cars”

If you have a background in engineering, chances are you’ll already have a good level or understanding of mechanical engineering principles. We accept applications from anyone with an existing engineering degree but require all students to participate in motorsport in some way. That can be building your own track car, volunteering as a scrutineer or marshal, working with a supplier or manufacturer – anything where you get your hands dirty and get some practical, hands-on experience.

There are 3 entry points for those who already have an engineering qualification at Level 3 or above:

BSc (Hons) Motorsport Engineering
Our BSc Motorsport Engineering full degree is most suitable for those who come from a different type of engineering setting. If you come from a civil engineering, electrical engineering and any other non-mechanical background, you may need to start from scratch to make sure that you have all of the relevant knowledge to get your career in motorsport off to the best start. The full BSc degree is also the best point of entry for anyone with a Level 3/BTEC or equivalent engineering qualification.

BSc (Hons) Motorsport Engineering Final Year Top-Up
Our BSc Motorsport Engineering Final Year Top Up is ideal for anyone with an existing engineering degree or Level 4/HND as long as our tutors are convinced that you already have a good enough grounding in the areas you’d miss. A Top Up degree allows you to study just the final year of the degree course yet still achieve a full BSc degree. This is most suitable for those with an existing aerospace or mechanical engineering degree where you will probably already have covered areas such as fluid dynamics, R&D simulation and mathematics. You will miss out on the Fundamentals of Motorsport Technology, Race Car Design & Preparation, Engine Design, Development and Simulation and Vehicle Mechanics & Data Acquisition as well but these modules are available separately as CPD so if there’s a specific subject area you’d like to cover you can study this first and then move onto the Top Up Degree.

MSc Advanced Motorsport Engineering
The MSc Advanced Motorsport Engineering is suitable for anyone who already has an engineering degree and understands mechanical engineering principles but perhaps lacks recent hands-on experience. You’ll study Advanced Vehicle Dynamics, Design & Modelling of Motorsport Systems and Multi-Physics Analysis for Motorsport so any background in physics and engineering will be a plus. Again, if you’re not currently working in motorsport, we recommend that you participate in the industry in some respect. The Master’s culminates in a final advanced motorsport project so any hands-on experience you can get can be used towards your degree. You could buy a track car and develop it as a project or offer your skills to a local team or manufacturer.

Immerse Yourself
Immersing yourself in the industry is of the best ways to improve your career prospects. Read as much as you can, learn as much as you can and get as much hands-on experience as possible. This is one industry which rewards the hard work and dedication of those who sacrifice to succeed. Careers in motorsport are hard work but massively rewarding. Studying for a motorsport degree is a sure-fire way to improve your career in motorsport. You’ll learn all the skills to convert your current experience into specialist knowledge. If you’d like to find out more about working in motorsport, you’ll find some great resources on our blog or visit our industry zone for more information about the different career options in motorsport.

Accelerate Your Career in Motorsport
You can find out more about the National Motorsport Academy's specialist motorsport degrees by downloading our course guide.
Click Here https://motorsport.nda.ac.uk/course-guide-download/
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