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Old 3rd December 2020, 16:43   #61
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Default Re: Wandering Spirits Unleashed: My 2020 Royal Enfield Himalayan

You really tested the patience of many bhpians in disclosing bike# 3 in your garage and the wait has paid off with this bonkers-of-a-review!

Lovely attention to detail and appreciate the efforts of the fellow bhpians who have helped you with this review. It was like reading an encyclopedia for the Himalayan which probably RE should use in their coffee table books.

As always, looking forward to your ownership experience.

Cheers
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Old 4th December 2020, 06:11   #62
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Default Re: Wandering Spirits Unleashed: My 2020 Royal Enfield Himalayan

Hello karthikk,
What a post this one is, a well deserved 5 star rating post I can say. I don’t know how many days you took to create a post like this one but it literally took 4 days for me to reach at this juncture (starting with your review, reading all the points line by line along with comments/feedback of fellow bhpians and your replies).

In one word, I say ‘PATIENCE’. Your review is like a story narration, a screenplay in which I visualised myself into it assuming I’m the one dealing with a bike. Red is my favourite color too and the bike looks a real stunner in red. This may be a strong reason for me to open your post but from there, it is you who made me to read everything.

I have no traces of recollecting memories reading your posts earlier but now I will do it for sure, starting with the Interceptor.

Even I’m a tall boy like you (6’2”) and felt happy that there is a bike where I can fit in comfortably as a rider. The comfort of pillion rider is a additional smile on my face, as me and my wife always had a Tom and Jerry fights on our Vespa journey.

Coming to the accessories part, panniers really attracted me a lot considering their part in the journey. I mostly commute in the city but these panniers I felt will be a boon for all kinds of needs for city rides too (including milk and eggs ) but I have my doubts about the practicality in daily use of the panniers. Will be glad to know if any alternative accessories available as these are also considered illegal even though they are sourced from RE directly.

I pause myself here and look forward for updates from you about your experiences.

Happy mile munching!!

Almost forgot to mention, a big thanks to the fellow bhpians who helped you in every aspect of your bike including the great picture coverage. Thank you.

Last edited by Aditya : 4th December 2020 at 22:53. Reason: Extra smiley deleted
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Old 4th December 2020, 18:53   #63
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Default Re: Wandering Spirits Unleashed: My 2020 Royal Enfield Himalayan

Quote:
Originally Posted by shyamg28 View Post
Loaded question I tell you

In terms of issues so far:
1. Clutch cable broken at around 18k kms. So I always carry a spare since then.
2. Minor engine oil leakage. As @VijayAnand mentioned, a quick gasket replacement and done.
3. The moisture seepage in the console is common with me too but I wait for the sun to get rid of it, doesn't bother me.
4. The speedo console vibrates severely at 100kph. I just added some tape across the circumference for now.
5. Rear tyre wore off at around 17k kms I think. Replaced with MRF Metor-M, stock size.
6. Replaced front tyre at 23k kms. Same as above.
7. Broke my clutch lever when someone rear-ended me. Replaced that with Pulsar lever. Works for now, but I plan to install the RE handguards next when I take it RE service center.
8. Funnily enough, the day I bought the bike, I had a puncture. After that, nada (touching wood as I type this).
9. Mud splatter at the rear. Wife absolutely hates it. I see you noticed too. If you come up with a solution, be sure to update here, so that I can copy the solution from you.
10. Engine heating initially was new to me, coming from liquid cooled Pulsar AS200. Had me looking at the console for temperature every 2 minutes in city. Now I don't care one bit.
Thank you for such detailed insights, they are really helpful to envision ownership over a long term

Quote:
You're absolutely right, some deflection is better than no deflection. Anyhow, over time if you do need to upgrade, you could think about the Pro-Spec Easy Ride clip on, adjustable visor.
Thank you for this resource, I think it makes a good add-on when venturing out on the next big roadtrip.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fan@Automotive View Post
As always, one more 5 starrer from you Karthik.

Very detailed and insightful. I appreciate your consistency, with each of your threads. The effort put in, in capturing the Photos and details is no less than any professional would.

It's always good to have options in one's garage, if at all, one intends to have them and has the patience to take care of them. I am not a one machine, fit for all person.

Good to read people being happy with newer and better RE products. However, I am done with RE, owning a 2007 Machismo 350 and 2010 Standard 350. They are keepers and will be kept.

Having ridden KTM's, Duke 200 and 390 fairly, was a little inclined towards the Adventure 390. First impressions after test drives from aspirants is slowly and surely influencing me to look for options.

Having had enough of 300ish CC rides and lack of impressive options in the half liter bike segment, next one will be a mile munching big bike. Might go the Ninja way. With your permission, will PM you for inputs once I decide.

I have no words to describe your craze (if I may say so) for a wardrobe with bike specific riding gears. Could you please let us know the cost of your gear, this time around as you have done previously? It would be of help.

Happy and Safe riding.
Thank you for your kind words, really happy to know you liked the review. I hear you on the limitations of the smaller displacement segments and wanting to look beyond that. Do feel free to PM me if I can be of any help with regard to information on my (big bike) experience.

Quote:
Originally Posted by srinath34 View Post
You really tested the patience of many bhpians in disclosing bike# 3 in your garage and the wait has paid off with this bonkers-of-a-review!

Lovely attention to detail and appreciate the efforts of the fellow bhpians who have helped you with this review. It was like reading an encyclopedia for the Himalayan which probably RE should use in their coffee table books.

As always, looking forward to your ownership experience.

Cheers
Thank you so much for your kind words Srinath34, I really did take time for this, but it was mostly because I wanted to clock some considerable miles on it over varied types of usage before putting my opinions down on paper (or browser nowadays), lol! deepfreak15 did a fab job with the pictures as you said, no doubt!

Quote:
Originally Posted by ManneAtWheelz View Post
Hello karthikk,
What a post this one is, a well deserved 5 star rating post I can say. I donít know how many days you took to create a post like this one but it literally took 4 days for me to reach at this juncture (starting with your review, reading all the points line by line along with comments/feedback of fellow bhpians and your replies).

In one word, I say ĎPATIENCEí. Your review is like a story narration, a screenplay in which I visualised myself into it assuming Iím the one dealing with a bike. Red is my favourite color too and the bike looks a real stunner in red. This may be a strong reason for me to open your post but from there, it is you who made me to read everything.

I have no traces of recollecting memories reading your posts earlier but now I will do it for sure, starting with the Interceptor.
Thanks a lot ManneAtWheelz, I kept noting down observations over the past 5 months whenever I used to infer something, and finally compiled everything around the time the review was taking shape. Thank you for having the patience to read through the entire thread and its replies too! I am elated to know you liked the flow and content.

Quote:
Even Iím a tall boy like you (6í2Ē) and felt happy that there is a bike where I can fit in comfortably as a rider. The comfort of pillion rider is a additional smile on my face, as me and my wife always had a Tom and Jerry fights on our Vespa journey.
True, this bike is good for tall riders + pillions, might match your needs nicely!

Quote:
Coming to the accessories part, panniers really attracted me a lot considering their part in the journey. I mostly commute in the city but these panniers I felt will be a boon for all kinds of needs for city rides too (including milk and eggs ) but I have my doubts about the practicality in daily use of the panniers. Will be glad to know if any alternative accessories available as these are also considered illegal even though they are sourced from RE directly.
Haha, I think they would be overkill for milk and eggs In the city, if there is very closely spaced traffic, these can get cumbersome to manage and keep track of. Occasionally when touring and entering/exiting city it is fine. But on daily commute or errand mode, the panniers will be overkill and potentially a hazard as well. I don't recommend using these for city errands. Nothing illegal about them as such, but they fall in the same ambit as other modifications / accessories (technically any modification is illegal) to vehicles. I'd stick to OE where possible simply because they have already tested the weight bearing aspects, etc and also offer warranty on these fitments.

For luggage, you can look at saddlebags / softbags as an alternative. They are more flexible but come with other caveats - not weatherproof, cannot be locked and weight needs to be perfectly balanced on both sides
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Old 3rd January 2021, 04:48   #64
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Default Re: Wandering Spirits Unleashed: My 2020 Royal Enfield Himalayan

Karthik I am absolutely loving each of your motorbike threads. Actually opened up two / three of them last few days just to skim over. Love the entire setup and format.

I agree that the Interceptor canít do what the Himalayan can. But I feel that the Himalayan actually renders the Interceptor redundant. It can be the city all purpose bike and the rough touring bike and if you want something big and powerful to ride, there is always the Ninja 1000. I canít think of any use of the Interceptor which cant be done just as well on one of the other two. Thoughts?
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Old 4th January 2021, 09:10   #65
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Default Re: Wandering Spirits Unleashed: My 2020 Royal Enfield Himalayan

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Originally Posted by Axe77 View Post
Karthik I am absolutely loving each of your motorbike threads. Actually opened up two / three of them last few days just to skim over. Love the entire setup and format.
Thank you for your kind words Axe77, glad you liked reading through them

Quote:
I agree that the Interceptor can’t do what the Himalayan can. But I feel that the Himalayan actually renders the Interceptor redundant. It can be the city all purpose bike and the rough touring bike and if you want something big and powerful to ride, there is always the Ninja 1000. I can’t think of any use of the Interceptor which cant be done just as well on one of the other two. Thoughts?
Oh no, not quite my experience with the two. For city usage, one tends to praise just the upright ergonomics of the Himalayan but there is more to the convenience angle than just the sitting posture and ground clearance when it comes to traffic / urban use.

For one, the Interceptor has zero heat issues and is way more refined than the single cylinder mill. This is itself quite a significant factor when doing 3-4 hour traffic ridden commutes on a daily basis.

Two, the Interceptor is a shorter and more compact motorcycle and is easier to ride and manoeuvre through tight traffic gaps. It is also easier to park and crawl despite being marginally heavier. The Himalayan is bulkier, more top heavy and front visibility is poor at low speeds (think of crawling in choc-a-bloc traffic) due to the large visor and you can see hardly see what is 3-4 feet ahead of the front wheel (you can't see anything so close).

Three, a heavier clutch and weaker brakes on the Himalayan mean your left hand will suffer more fatigue, and the weaker brakes mean you have to be more alert towards reacting to morons on the road.

Four, the Interceptor is way more enjoyable on open stretches (fast roads in the city) due to twice the power and torque and better brakes. And whenever I need a wind-in-the-face (fast) riding experience of a naked bike on the highways, the Interceptor serves to scratch that itch in addition to ticking all the practicality boxes on weekdays.

I had bought the Interceptor primarily because it shined on the basic usability parameters and when I used to do 3-4 hours of traffic ridden commutes everyday, but of course no one anticipated the covid situation leading to permanent work-from-home for so long For now, the Interceptor's usage was forced to be reduced, but once the situation improves and offices open up, I'd definitely get back to riding to work even on a voluntary basis and the Interceptor's original purpose will be met.

All in all, I would say the Himalayan has a narrower scope of usage (fuss-free tour anywhere) versus the Interceptor which is 10X more versatile and enjoyable in 80% of the situations and only lacks in that 15-20% (pillion support and tolerance to bad roads).

Last edited by KarthikK : 4th January 2021 at 09:18.
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