Team-BHP

Team-BHP (https://www.team-bhp.com/forum/)
-   On owning a car (https://www.team-bhp.com/forum/owning-car/)
-   -   ARTICLE: How to Run-In your new car (https://www.team-bhp.com/forum/owning-car/67729-article-how-run-your-new-car-51.html)

pacman2881 19th May 2017 15:24

Re: ARTICLE: How to Run-In your new car
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by a4anurag (Post 4201382)
No harm in going to 3000 RPM once in a while. Just keep the RPM varying continuously and do NOT lug the engine.

Keep increasing the RPM limit slowly.

Best is to be in that range as mentioned by you 2000-2200 RPM.


agree: My confusion here is, why is Hyundai recommending a specifc range 2k - 4k rpm? They are not even saying keep it below X rpm.

eko 19th May 2017 17:15

Re: ARTICLE: How to Run-In your new car
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by pacman2881 (Post 4201333)

All along I thought 2000 /2200 rpm is the max advisable. Did they make a mistake while writing the manual or am I missing something?

The production process and metallurgy is so advanced and refined now that the running -in does not mean much for modern vehicles.

adi_gt 23rd December 2017 20:23

Re: ARTICLE: How to Run-In your new car
 
How to vary the rpms in Automatic car ? I have recently purchases Jazz CVT and it tends to run at 1100rpm for speeds as low as 10 to 40-50km/hr. Any special trick to run in a CVT transmission engine ?

freedom 23rd December 2017 20:55

Quote:

Originally Posted by adi_gt (Post 4327509)
Any special trick to run in a CVT transmission engine ?

Unique problem.

I think Jazz has a sports mode. You can use paddles shifts and varying inputs of A pedal to get some variations.
Try to drive it up and down some ghats it will help.
Apart from engine another part of run-in is the gearbox.
For manual/DSG GB it's about using all the gears to help everything set in.
For a CVT i think the bands between the drive and driven side need should be ser in correctly by giving it reasonable stress.

The good thing for CVT is that the band will always move around and run in easily. The band is what helps keep engine always maintain low rpm range.

ashokabs 30th December 2017 22:18

Re: ARTICLE: How to Run-In your new car
 
There are really 3 points related to running in engines.

1. It is certainly not true that there is so much precision in manufacturing that bedding in of the piston rings in the cylinders is not required. Though it is probably true that if it required 2500 miles 20 years ago it probably requires 1000 miles today. Hence, all manufacturers do recommend running in. Their recommendation really relates to going easy in a new engine. This also applies to all the bush bearings and shafts.
2. It is believed that most manufacturers do some running in at the works to avoid too many warranty issues as owners are notorious in not reading manuals and recommendations. I think those who are in the engine manufacturing industry can comment on this.
3. If bedding in is required then it does mean that some metal particles are going to be in the lube oil. These might be very small but could cause some damage to the moving parts. Hence, might be prudent to change the oil after 1000 km at the first service.

diyguy 31st December 2017 13:12

First service is usually 5k or 10k for the more refined engines. For a TUV3OO should I go and enforce an oil change to synthetic oil after 1500-2000km?

diyguy 16th June 2018 18:55

Driving a brand new rental car Chevy Dodge Journey in the US. There is no such concept of break in for these vehicles. Got it with 12miles on the ODO. No performance issues or any stutters of any kind.

psinide 18th July 2018 15:39

Re: ARTICLE: How to Run-In your new car
 
A quick question on running-in automatics. I own a XUV5OO W11 Automatic and the AT doesn't switch gears under 2000 RPM for the lower gears, sometimes even not until 2300-2400 RPM.

I consistently drive with a light foot on the accelerator with the very rare revving to 3000 RPM to make sure I'm not babying the engine. Is consisting switching between 2000-2300 RPM healthy during the running in period? Or should I be using the manual mode for lower gears?

I have noticed that at lower gears, even in manual mode, the AT doesn't let me upshift until the revs hit 2000 RPM.

Also, I am almost at the 1k mark now, and wanted to check if I should force change of the engine oil for the 1st servicing of the car. I've read that during the running in period the engine oil may contain some metal particles.

Thanks in advance!

rageshgr 18th July 2018 16:58

Re: ARTICLE: How to Run-In your new car
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by psinide (Post 4430490)
A quick question on running-in automatics. I own a XUV5OO W11 Automatic and the AT doesn't switch gears under 2000 RPM for the lower gears, sometimes even not until 2300-2400 RPM.

I consistently drive with a light foot on the accelerator with the very rare revving to 3000 RPM to make sure I'm not babying the engine. Is consisting switching between 2000-2300 RPM healthy during the running in period? Or should I be using the manual mode for lower gears?

I have noticed that at lower gears, even in manual mode, the AT doesn't let me upshift until the revs hit 2000 RPM.

Thanks in advance!

2000 rpm is a good threshold for up-shift. Even in Manual mode, if it does not allow you to up shift before 2000 rpm, means that it is designed that way. It is not about the 2000 rpm per se. It is more about the post up-shift rpm too. Think about what rpm the engine will fall to, after you up shift. The new rpm should not be so low that it will lug the engine. It depends on the gearing.

Hence, 2000-2500 rm is a healthy up shift point. And it is better to be in turbo zone rather than be at very low rpm which is inefficient and might lug the engine as well. Also, now that it has done 1000 km, time to open up a little more.

snipejus 30th July 2018 12:44

Re: ARTICLE: How to Run-In your new car
 
I know this might be a repeated question but I didn’t seem to find a definitive answer. I recently bought an i10grand I’m still on my run-in at around 600km as of now. Have been keeping the revs below 3.5-4K so far. So according to Hyundai’s Manual and the showroom where I bought my vehicle, they recommend an oil change only at 10k kms and they only do a minor checkup at 1.5-2k kms (no oil change). I’m not convinced with this, any advice on if I should stick with what they are saying or if I should go ahead with a change in engine oil and an oil filter.

Thanks in advance.

mithun 3rd August 2018 15:20

Re: ARTICLE: How to Run-In your new car
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by snipejus (Post 4436033)
I know this might be a repeated question but I didn’t seem to find a definitive answer. I recently bought an i10grand I’m still on my run-in at around 600km as of now. Have been keeping the revs below 3.5-4K so far. So according to Hyundai’s Manual and the showroom where I bought my vehicle, they recommend an oil change only at 10k kms and they only do a minor checkup at 1.5-2k kms (no oil change). I’m not convinced with this, any advice on if I should stick with what they are saying or if I should go ahead with a change in engine oil and an oil filter.

Thanks in advance.

We had paid from the pocket for oil for the i10 on its first service. Just change the oil.


If you want to stick to the manual, its also fine.

ashwinprakas 13th November 2018 20:57

Busting The Engine Break In Myth by Ari Henning from Motorcyclist Magazine
 
Hey guys,

As fans of Ari might already know he's leaving Motorcyclist Magazine and as his final video on MC Garage he's come with a video presenting hard evidence to settle the age old dispute of which Run-In Practice makes the most sense.

Teaser: He builds identical motors and breaks them in using the two different methods!

For the less informed, there are two primary means of getting this done.

1. Factory Method as mentioned in the Instructions manual i.e varying RPM under the redline for the first 2000 KM's.

2. Hard Break-In/Motoman Method in which we redline and engine brake pretty hard, riding at WOT almost as soon as the motorcycle is done warming up after its first start.

Now that you know about the basics let's dive into the video;

Busting The Engine Break In Myth

Personally I follow a mix of both considering that my choices are usually mass production Indian motorcycles, so it's 50~150 KM's of sedate riding with varied RPM's follows by an oil change, regular riding until the 500 KM's mark before which I redline hard at WOT and engine brake with the same aggression in every gear before going in for an oil change which officially ends the run in for me.

Do share your thoughts on the same and also share if you have a Method that is unique but has proven to be reliable over time, though I doubt that would make sense considering what the video goes to prove! :D

bigron 13th November 2018 22:16

Re: Busting The Engine Break In Myth by Ari Henning from Motorcyclist Magazine
 
Aah, the famous 'how to break-in your engine' conversation. A 100 posts will have a 100 different views on this.
Speaking for myself, I have revved my engines to the red line the minute I ve gotten hold of them. Be it my 25 year old 98 cc 2 stoke or my 9 year old 1340 cc 4 stroke fat gixxer and everything in between.
The one thing I avoid though and almost never do no matter what I am riding is red lining in the first gear. Start normal , shift up and go WOT. But never in the first gear.
Has worked for me and my engines.

ArizonaJim 13th November 2018 22:33

Re: Busting The Engine Break In Myth by Ari Henning from Motorcyclist Magazine
 
I noticed he was using water cooled engines for his test.
Water cooled engines generally have more uniform temperatures than air cooled engines so local hot spots which can cause damage to the moving parts is minimized.


For those who are riding a new motorcycle that has an air cooled engine I strongly suggest that a easy break in should be used.
The localized hot spots need time for the mating parts to wear in to fit each other like they should.



I also noticed, there was one difference between the engines when they were torn apart and inspected.
He didn't say which engine had the larger "ring gap" but I'm willing to bet it was the engine that had been broken in hard with lots of WOT used.
This larger gap indicates greater wear on the rings sealing surface which will result in decreased piston ring life.


It wouldn't surprise me to find that other areas where the surfaces are sliding against each other like the sleeve bearing at the upper end of the connecting rod and the valve stem/valve guides also had increased wear.


While there is little doubt that modern material and lubricating oils are much better than those used years ago, I suggest following the manufactures break in guidelines as much as possible.
Yes, it isn't necessary to always follow the rules but riding easy for the first few hundred km can be a good thing.

ashwinprakas 13th November 2018 22:45

Re: Busting The Engine Break In Myth by Ari Henning from Motorcyclist Magazine
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ArizonaJim (Post 4494594)
I also noticed, there was one difference between the engines when they were torn apart and inspected.
He didn't say which engine had the larger "ring gap" but I'm willing to bet it was the engine that had been broken in hard with lots of WOT used.
This larger gap indicates greater wear on the rings sealing surface which will result in decreased piston ring life.

Engine Break-In Specs:

Engine 1, “By The Book Break-In”

Installed at 1,828 miles, removed at 2,861 miles
Break-In Notes: Ridden gently. Didn’t exceed 50% throttle or 5,000 rpm for the first 600 miles, and didn’t exceed 75% throttle or 7,000 rpm until 1,000 miles. Didn’t experience WOT until 1,000 miles was accumulated. Ridden with constantly varying engine speed and load, no easy task on a slow bike in a busy, urban environment! Oil and filter changed at 600 miles.
Piston OD: 2.9910” at install, 2.9910” after 1,000 miles
Cylinder ID: 2.9925” at install, 2.9930” after 1,000 miles
Top Ring End Gap: 0.0130” at install, 0.0145” after 1,000 miles
Compression: 235 psi hot after 1,000 miles
Leak Down: 4% hot after 1,000 miles


Engine 2, “Brutal Break-In"

Installed at 2,861 miles, removed at 3,890 miles
Break-In Notes: Went to WOT within moments of first starting up, and was ridden hard for 1,000 miles. Did everything we’re told not to—lots of throttle and high-speed droning at steady throttle. Oil and filter changed at 600 miles.
Piston OD: 2.9910” at install, 2.9910” after 1,000 miles
Cylinder ID: 2.9925” at install, 2.9930” after 1,000 miles
Top Ring End Gap: 0.0130” at install, 0.0150” after 1,000 miles
Compression: 235 psi hot after 1,000 miles
Leak Down: 4% hot after 1,000 miles


All times are GMT +5.5. The time now is 04:43.