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Old 20th October 2020, 23:07   #4936
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Originally Posted by ebonho View Post
Long live Mad Max indeed.��

Helicoiling the crank might be a better long term solution for a keeper. Pedals have a way of parting ways with the crank at the most inopportune of moments and circumstances in my experience.

I have exactly the same adjustable Pro Sport stem on my ACT and mine is jammed solid in multiple seasons of rain. So it's with great envy I note you've managed to free yours up and put the bar fully upright. Wurth again? How about WD40? I've tried oil with zero luck. It's the small toothed wedge piece underneath at the bolt that's jammed.

Cheers, Doc
A Helicoil sounds like a good idea, if I don't first come across a comparable complete scrap crankarm (cycle shop buddy had one, but wanted to keep it as it was the harder-to-find old style with the square rotated 45degrees).

As for the stem, I got to that today.

Maybe you'll already know all this, but here goes:

One side (left side in my case) is a hex-key screw, the other side (which looks same from.outside) is actually a tightly fitted pin/sleeve with internal threads, into which the opposing screw is threaded.

The sleeve actually locks the whole thing down when inserted upon assembly, and must be fully removed before you can swivel the stem up or down.

Tricky part is it's pressed in there tight - really tight - I think even without corrosion. And you don't want to bugger up those internal threads trying to drive it out.

So what I did was after removing the screw from the left side, I got about a 2" long bolt of same thread to thread fully back into it, then whacked on that good with a hammer to drive the whole pin out to the right.

Once that was out, everything was immediately free... and you see how corroded my bike is, top to bottom (two sperate observers wondered aloud whether it had been pulled from the river!).

Cleaned out the mating "splines" (teeth) on both pieces, cleaned most of the corrosion from the holes, chamfered the thread-end of the pin to make it easier to drive back in, and voila!

I think the bores and pin are machined to be really tight in order to drive the splines tightly together. If they were not, it would surely loosen up with use/abuse. So I wouldn't overkill cleaning the ID's. it's designed to be super-tight, I'm surmising.

Btw on an earlier topic it's possible that mine would have originally had a cassette type rear sprocket set. The one rim/freewheel given me with the bike was certainly not the original, as it was not a dual-threaded disc-brake hub. So as mentioned I used that one on the front for its disc, and took the disc-equipped wheel off the Hi-Bird for the rear.

Two questions:

1) What's the advantage of a cassette-type (have one on that 700C junker and it's a neat design);

2) Where can we find info on ACT as a company / producer? What's their history? Could you post a pic of your own?

Thanks for all your encouragement throughout this little project.

-Eric

P.S. we'll see about that seat-post. I'm 6'2", so it's gotta be long, but on the other hand am down to 76kg's after some conscientious diet/exercise this past month... goal being 74...

Last edited by ringoism : 20th October 2020 at 23:14.
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Old 20th October 2020, 23:47   #4937
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A Helicoil sounds like a good idea, if I don't first come across a comparable complete scrap crankarm (cycle shop buddy had one, but wanted to keep it as it was the harder-to-find old style with the square rotated 45degrees).

As for the stem, I got to that today.

Maybe you'll already know all this, but here goes:

One side (left side in my case) is a hex-key screw, the other side (which looks same from.outside) is actually a tightly fitted pin/sleeve with internal threads, into which the opposing screw is threaded.

The sleeve actually locks the whole thing down when inserted upon assembly, and must be fully removed before you can swivel the stem up or down.

Tricky part is it's pressed in there tight - really tight - I think even without corrosion. And you don't want to bugger up those internal threads trying to drive it out.

So what I did was after removing the screw from the left side, I got about a 2" long bolt of same thread to thread fully back into it, then whacked on that good with a hammer to drive the whole pin out to the right.

Once that was out, everything was immediately free... and you see how corroded my bike is, top to bottom (two sperate observers wondered aloud whether it had been pulled from the river!).

Cleaned out the mating "splines" (teeth) on both pieces, cleaned most of the corrosion from the holes, chamfered the thread-end of the pin to make it easier to drive back in, and voila!

I think the bores and pin are machined to be really tight in order to drive the splines tightly together. If they were not, it would surely loosen up with use/abuse. So I wouldn't overkill cleaning the ID's. it's designed to be super-tight, I'm surmising.

Btw on an earlier topic it's possible that mine would have originally had a cassette type rear sprocket set. The one rim/freewheel given me with the bike was certainly not the original, as it was not a dual-threaded disc-brake hub. So as mentioned I used that one on the front for its disc, and took the disc-equipped wheel off the Hi-Bird for the rear.

Two questions:

1) What's the advantage of a cassette-type (have one on that 700C junker and it's a neat design);

2) Where can we find info on ACT as a company / producer? What's their history? Could you post a pic of your own?

Thanks for all your encouragement throughout this little project.

-Eric

P.S. we'll see about that seat-post. I'm 6'2", so it's gotta be long, but on the other hand am down to 76kg's after some conscientious diet/exercise this past month... goal being 74...
Thanks for the tutorial. I used to just loosen the bolt below, adjust the stem, and retighten the bolt with the toothed wedge piece now engaging with new teeth internally (the sleeve you describe I'm guessing).Saw this on You Tube in the early days, and played around with various angles as I got fitter, even slamming it flat for some criterion races (with 23c slicks). She moves!

But now the stem is jammed, that piece is stuck, and hence the position luckily for me is stuck at the angle Ive done all my BRMs on her with and most of the 12000 odd Kms I've clocked on her. So honestly I'm not really fussed it's jammed, functionally at least. It's just that there's something on my bike that's not working as it should that's gnawing at me from time to time (OCD ).

There's no real advantage of a cassette over a thread on freewheel except that you can get better ratio cassettes compared to freewheels of the same number of cogs because manufacturers still make them while freewheels have been relegated to basic starter cheap bikes over the years.

Also with a freewheel the smallest cig you can go down to is a 14, whereas on a cassette you can go as low as a 12 for a 7 speed and 11 for 8 speed and above. So more speed, taller gearing.

For the bigger cogs, there is no issue. The other freewheel that you have which has a bigger biggest cog (I'm guessing 34T) but a smaller next cog (24T in all probability) is what's called a MegaRange freewheel (also called Alpine gearing where you get a really big "granny" gear to go over steep climbs, while the other remaining cogs are normally sized and evenly spaced.

The one you have currently with normally spaced gears is probably a more standard 14-28.

I had that on my ACT stock, but I changed over to a MegaRange (same as on my other Hercules steel MTB ... though that one is a 3x6 grip shift) to help me get my weight over the steeper climbs, and I've never changed back since.

All depends on how much you weigh, the gradients you ride, and how strong you are.

If you find you have to get off and walk even after hitting the lowest gear, then you could think of going for the MegaRange. Otherwise stick to the current one, and keep that one as a spare (freewheels are sturdy, but eventually they do need to be replaced).

Cheers, Doc
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Old 21st October 2020, 16:13   #4938
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Originally Posted by ringoism View Post
One side (left side in my case) is a hex-key screw, the other side (which looks same from.outside) is actually a tightly fitted pin/sleeve with internal threads, into which the opposing screw is threaded.

The sleeve actually locks the whole thing down when inserted upon assembly, and must be fully removed before you can swivel the stem up or down.

Tricky part is it's pressed in there tight - really tight - I think even without corrosion. And you don't want to bugger up those internal threads trying to drive it out.

So what I did was after removing the screw from the left side, I got about a 2" long bolt of same thread to thread fully back into it, then whacked on that good with a hammer to drive the whole pin out to the right.

Once that was out, everything was immediately free... and you see how corroded my bike is, top to bottom (two sperate observers wondered aloud whether it had been pulled from the river!).

Cleaned out the mating "splines" (teeth) on both pieces, cleaned most of the corrosion from the holes, chamfered the thread-end of the pin to make it easier to drive back in, and voila!

I think the bores and pin are machined to be really tight in order to drive the splines tightly together. If they were not, it would surely loosen up with use/abuse. So I wouldn't overkill cleaning the ID's. it's designed to be super-tight, I'm surmising.

This is what I meant by the wedge below being the adjustment point and not the side bolt and sleeve.



In my case a few whacks has not dislodged it nor are the side bolts budging a mm.

Cheers, Doc
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Old 22nd October 2020, 22:48   #4939
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This is what I meant by the wedge below being the adjustment point and not the side bolt and sleeve.


In my case a few whacks has not dislodged it nor are the side bolts budging a mm.

Cheers, Doc
Well, this is hilarious/embarrassing - I think I completely missed the fact of that lower wedge/bolt even being there!

That said, if you could manage (with Würth?) to get the left-side screw out and drive out the pin to the right as I did, I suspect it could pave the way towards prying out that wedge, as well, whereupon it could be cleaned up with some emery cloth and made to work as intended again.

Once the stem is in two pieces, it seems it would be easier to get a screwdriver up into the space and get some bite/leverage.

I'm gonna have another look at mine tomorrow... almost feel like going down there right now. Can't believe I missed the existence of that bolt/wedge, even after your mentioning it!

-Eric

Last edited by ringoism : 22nd October 2020 at 22:49.
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Old 23rd October 2020, 08:12   #4940
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Wanted to share a little boo boo of mine from the last weekend. So my group planned to do an endurance ride on the KMP expressway last Sunday. Plan was to ride 1h 20 towards Palwal before taking a u-turn back to Manesar. I did not take pre-ride and ride nutrition seriously until now. My first 35-40 km was f-a-s-t. Was clipping at 27+ average. Post which I crashed badly, speed reduced considerably. I was carrying two snickers, a yoga bar, 2 bottles of water and a small bottle of fast & up. I started eating at the 1h 45 mark. I feel I should have started munching and sipping much sooner - like the 1 hour mark. The chilly mornings didn't help. Rookie mistake - fell short of my 75km / 3 hour target.

In other news, in the early days I was struggling to hit 20 km average speeds on this Firefox MTB. Riding an mtb regularly on the hilly GFR road and with faster riders has proven to be a great strength and conditioning regime. Now, I am hustling it hard and even giving a good chase to the slower road bike riders. This ride got me thinking of a faster bike. I have a borrowed a Montra Trance Pro to try out a hybrid. I have also tried a Triban RC 500 which I liked a lot. On the other end of the spectrum I rode a Specialized Allez Sprint Comp. An upgrade is on the cards within a couple of months - looking at a Sora groupset bike. The RC 500 seems like a great VFM deal to me. Any other suggestions for an entry or mid entry level road bike? Just waiting for the cycling fad to get over and for bikes to come back in stock. Saw good specs on Firefox Tarmak apart from the Tribans.

Cheers,
Promit
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Old 23rd October 2020, 10:31   #4941
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There is the Triban 100 in flat bar and low bar versions, Triban RC 120 and Riverside 500.

I think, among these, as of today, only the Triban 100 low bar version is available online (by app - not sure of in store availability)

(I am waiting for the 7 speed Riverside 100 - mainly to introduce my school going kids into this.)

Last edited by BaCkSeAtDrIVeR : 23rd October 2020 at 10:33.
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Old 23rd October 2020, 11:17   #4942
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Originally Posted by BaCkSeAtDrIVeR View Post
There is the Triban 100 in flat bar and low bar versions, Triban RC 120 and Riverside 500.

I think, among these, as of today, only the Triban 100 low bar version is available online (by app - not sure of in store availability)

(I am waiting for the 7 speed Riverside 100 - mainly to introduce my school going kids into this.)
My Decathlon buddy is planning a Jammu Srinagar Kargil Leh Manali Jammu bikepacking ride next year. Sounds exciting so if I wanted to join him I'd need a MTB. I'm not sure my ACT wheels and rigid fork would take the bashing with some luggage added.

One option is to look for OLX/ Cyclop steal deals (difficult in pandemic times).

The other option he threw at me last night was picking up a new Rockrider ST100.

With double walled rims, Suntour XCT suspension fork, 27.5 vs 26 inchers, and thumb shifters vs grip shifters it seems a step above tge older Rockrider 340, at just a couple of thousand bucks more (14k vs 16k).

The ST50 at 14k is more like the RR 340 it replaces.

Previously their cheapest proper MTB with thumb shifters was the RR 540 at 25k. So its fantastic value for money that way.

Ar 15.5 kilos for the L it's not exactly light, but not heavy either considering the added weight of the suspension fork. For comparison, my naked bare-bones ACT comes in at 14.5 kilos.

Looks like a quality frame, though components (drive train) are BTwin's own proprietary MicroShift and not Shimano.

Comes in Grey (nice, classy) and Red colors.

The reason I'm sharing this is that kids do not appreciate the simplicity and lightness of a hybrid. To them a MTB with fat tyres and shockers is WAYYY cooler!

Cheers, Doc

Last edited by ebonho : 23rd October 2020 at 11:30.
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Old 23rd October 2020, 11:53   #4943
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The other option he threw at me last night was picking up a new Rockrider ST100.
I am a long time Triban 500 rider, and recently picked up a ST520 just for fun. I am now planning a Manali-Let myself next year on that, after I realised just how much fun it is. Light frame, great ergos, thumb shifters, discs, lockout suspension and good rolling wheels at a super price point. Do take a look at that.

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Old 23rd October 2020, 12:00   #4944
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Originally Posted by roy_libran View Post
I am a long time Triban 500 rider, and recently picked up a ST520 just for fun. I am now planning a Manali-Let myself next year on that after I realised just how much fun it is. Light frame, great ergos, thumb shifters, discs, lockout suspension and good rolling wheels at a super price point. Do take a look at that.
Man this is the famous black hole price creep of all cyclists around the world, but thanks for the real life feedback. Will take a look for sure!

Cheers, Doc
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Old 23rd October 2020, 13:57   #4945
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A Helicoil sounds like a good idea,.
If I understood your earlier post correctly it is the left pedal, where the previous owner messed up the thread? That is left handed thread, so you will need to get a left-handed helicoil and a left handed tap too. I know they are around on the internet, but you might have to shop around to find them.

It’s not something your typical hardware store might stock.

If you go the helicoil way could you show some images of how you go about it please?

I think it might be interesting for members to see how helicoils work and get used. It is a very useful way of fixing damaged thread. As you know it is often used on car and engines. Probably stripped thread on spark plug holes is one of the most common applications. And it is very suitable for DIY work. (even though it is used in many professional applications too)

I havent used them for years. Not sure if I have any in stock these days. Which just means I got very lucky with threads! (and use anti seize paste on everything)

Jeroen

Last edited by Jeroen : 23rd October 2020 at 13:59.
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Old 23rd October 2020, 14:57   #4946
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Man this is the famous black hole price creep of all cyclists around the world, but thanks for the real life feedback. Will take a look for sure!

Cheers, Doc
Took a look. Its nothing but the rebadged Rockrider 540 I was talking about in my earlier post. Same color combination even.

I think till this range the frames are Indian made. So a bit on the heavy side.

At 26k its 9k more than the ST100.

That 9K buys you mechanical Hayes discs (over the V brakes), 8 speed SRAM drive train (over the 7 speed MicroShift one), a fore aft adjustable saddle (over the welded version), a height adjustable stem, and 800 g less weight.

On the fork lockout (same Suntour XCT 80mm fork), I do not see it mentioned on their website for either of the grey-yellow or the yellow bikes?

https://www.decathlon.in/p/8535826/m...20-grey-yellow

https://www.decathlon.in/p/8535854/m...r-st520-yellow

Cheers, Doc

Last edited by ebonho : 23rd October 2020 at 15:03.
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Old 23rd October 2020, 15:17   #4947
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That 9K buys you mechanical Hayes discs (over the V brakes), 8 speed SRAM drive train (over the 7 speed MicroShift one), a fore aft adjustable saddle (over the welded version), a height adjustable stem, and 800 g less weight.

On the fork lockout (same Suntour XCT 80mm fork), I do not see it mentioned on their website for either of the grey-yellow or the yellow bikes?
Yes it replaced the RR540, but the frame has a slightly upright geometry. It is 24 speed overall though and the ratios are very usable. The fork isn't an outright lockout but you can weigh it to 120kgs for effective lockout. I haven't seen something better at this price point though.
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Old 23rd October 2020, 16:07   #4948
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Yes it replaced the RR540, but the frame has a slightly upright geometry. It is 24 speed overall though and the ratios are very usable. The fork isn't an outright lockout but you can weigh it to 120kgs for effective lockout. I haven't seen something better at this price point though.
Absolutely. The closest in the ST100 price range of 17k is the Montra Madrock. Which is a lot heavier and cruder (I've checked it out at a lbs in the past).

https://montra.in/mountain-bikes/madrock-27-5-2019/

Sure it has rear quick release and no-name disc brakes, but the fork is not a Suntour but the much cheaper Zoom and only 60mm travel. Also the wheels are 36 hole ones compared to the much nicer 28 hole aero wheels on the BTwin. On an MTB, the suspension and wheels are the key components, after the frame. And BTwin scores on all 3.

Montra offers the same Suntour XCT forks (albeit with mechanical lockout) only on the new 27k Rock 2.1 and beyond ... like the 30k+ Rock 4.1 range ... illuminating!

Firefox has only a steel frame MTB at this price point so not going to bother.

Also not looking at Schnell and Frog and similar brands.

At your ST520 price point of 26k, Montra has the old Rock 2.1 (cheaper Suntour M3030 75mm fork) and the new Rock 2.1 (1500 bucks more, better Suntour XCT fork with mechanical lockout, albeit only 75mm)

https://montra.in/mountain-bikes/rock-2-1-27-5-2018/

https://montra.in/mountain-bikes/rock-2-1-27-5-2019/

Both come with 36 hole double walled rim wheels. And no-name/Logan(?) discs.

And for what its worth, Firefox has a 60 mm Zoom mechanical lock-out fork Tornado at the same price point, with 32 hole wheels, Shimano Tourney drivetrain, and JAK 7 (?) mechanical discs ...

https://www.firefoxbikes.com/tornado/

Cheers, Doc

Last edited by ebonho : 23rd October 2020 at 16:29.
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Old 24th October 2020, 01:16   #4949
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This is what I meant by the wedge below being the adjustment point and not the side bolt and sleeve.

https://Youtu.be/opKVVPYz-LM

In my case a few whacks has not dislodged it nor are the side bolts budging a mm.

The Bicycles thread-img_20201023_100205_001.jpeg

Well, there it is
.. and boy, do I feel like a dummy...

I took out the lower screw, didn't feel like banging on things, and seeing how dirty/corroded mine is compared to the pristine one in the video, was sure the wedge would be badly stuck. Knocked the pin out, and the wedge just fell out... wow...

Live and learn...


Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeroen View Post
That is left handed thread, so you will need to get a left-handed helicoil and a left handed tap too.

It’s not something your typical hardware store might stock.

If you go the helicoil way could you show some images of how you go about it please?

I think it might be interesting for members to see how helicoils work and get used
Ah, yes, the left-handed threads could be a snag.

I'd have been happy to share my experience, but while we have plenty of helicopters here in Manali, certainly no helicoils (can't even find thread-locker or anti-seize).

Some chance in Chawri Bazar, Delhi, but doubtful I'll be down there anytime soon. Not hopeful re: Indian online sellers but can check.

For now quite sure it'll hold up with my kind of use. Can use threadlocker for a bit of extra strength. I'm not jumping the bike or even standing on the pedals a lot.

Probably will find another alloy crankarm before long, I gleaned some good takeoffs again today from my service buddy.

May already have one, even, and if not, I doubt a helicoil of that size/type would cost less than a complete new crankarm of modest grade.

Thanks,
Eric

Btw Doc, can't speak for all the roads you mentioned, but most of the Manali-Leh part is well-paved now. Leh-Kargil was good long back, as was Srinagar-Jammu.

Not sure the route really requires a suspended MTB at this point. Probably some rough patches, but most of it likely to be good roads. Places like Zanskar, Spiti, Killar, etc, another story entirely.

-Eric
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Old 24th October 2020, 14:13   #4950
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So, this is my human powered 2 wheeler, or weight reduction device as I would like to call it .

Brand wise it's a Firefox Athelio with an aluminium alloy frame measuring 19.5 inch / 49.5 cm , single speed drive and 700 X 35 C tyres . Bought it in 2017; the model is discontinued now, I believe.
I didn't get any fancy gadgets to measure distance paddled or calories burnt and have no plans of getting any either . Only thing I got was a bell, to make people move out of my way and a lock so that my cycle won't disappear on me one day .

During the pre-COVID-19 period , my cycling would start at 0600 hrs and I would cover 13-14 kms every morning . And together with a oat meal breakfast , I managed to shave off 7 kgs in 4 months . Hence the weight reduction machine .

SB

The Bicycles thread-firefox-athelio.jpg
(Photo taken during one of my daily 0600 hrs rides )
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