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Old 12th November 2017, 01:43   #121
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Default re: Royal Enfield unveils Interceptor & Continental 650 with new twin-cylinder engine. EDIT : Launched

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Originally Posted by ArizonaJim View Post
My 2011 500cc Bullet has proven to be totally reliable without any real problems. It currently has 36000+ km on it.
No reliability problems really seem to have arisen in the UK either. They were seen as very bad for years, but not at all in recent times, and there are way more being imported now. I do wonder if the export models go down a separate finishing line?!

India is tough on bikes - potholes, brutal speed breakers, heat and dust, cheap bikes probably suffer at the hands of inexpert mechanics - but 36k without missing a beat is quite different to what many Indians report, and I bet you don't treat it like a show pony with that sort of mileage done.

Coincidence?
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Old 12th November 2017, 02:16   #122
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Default re: Royal Enfield unveils Interceptor & Continental 650 with new twin-cylinder engine. EDIT : Launched

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Originally Posted by saargoga View Post
Old brit bikes in this case enfield (including its Indian ownership) still provided that bit of 'emotional connect' with the running engine that is distinct. This old world motoring has no similarity with KTM style power delivery or any sports bike for that matter.

I cannot say for others but I love these type of bikes, it have nothing to do with any heritage crap that RE tries to plant its just the man and machine connect.
I hear you, and have been thinking a lot on this lately. I really don't think I'm a slave to marketing, and have philosophical objections to posing; hardly watch TV / browse social media / read magazines. I enjoy all sorts of bikes (own five of them and have ridden many, many others), and feel there's a definite place for something like RE's, which are uniquely satisfying in terms of ride dynamics / experience. Just drop the spec-sheet please.

The connect needn't be only with the running engine... just the solidity, the metal - and yes, the good proportions stylistically... the broad seat and laid-back riding posture... The ability to move along at a reasonably brisk pace (on a 500 anyway) while hardly having to rev it or open the throttle beyond 1/4-1/2, or really bother about which gear you're in... Just very relaxing vs. quick/light more "nervous" machines (like my KB125RTZ, the Dukes, etc) or something like my Impulse, which can move along pretty well but only when revved hard / kept in the 'power band' - which is fun in its own way, but definitely not relaxing, also tending to accelerate engine wear, as I'm finding (15,000km and already consuming lube oil). And frustrating on the Hero and most smaller-displacement bikes is when you want nonexistent response from lower, leisurely revs - where any 500 Enfield has loads of immediate thrust on tap, way down low. The mild tuning of these twins promises more of the same.

As a technical guy, I DO find some of the old technical details pretty compelling... especially on Bullets, where that combination headlight casing / upper fork tube mount / speedo/ammeter / parking light / igntion switch holder represents a brilliantly efficient one-piece solution from an engineering / design standpoint). In the other direction (pre-UCE), the added complexity of the divorced gearbox - which conveniently allows for independently servicing / rebuilding without splitting the engine cases. And those toolboxes (well, unless they stuck the air filter in there) actually give you just a bit of storage for a few essentials, which this side of scooters you generally find nothing of at all. Pre-UCE we had exposed oil-supply lines and a solid-lifter valvetrain - this required periodic adjustments, but at least (vs. hydraulics) you could adjust it. Of course, the new twins exhibit none of these old-school features. True that most folks could care less, and overall, these have the potential to be the best modern Enfields ever.

The RE 350's were always too painfully slow for me to realistically connect with in these hills at least (in the plains it was a different story, and pillion humming along at 80 on a heavy-crank CI 350 (with modded dual exhaust ports/pipes) on some relatively empty Delhi expressways years ago may have been the first time I started to "get" it - just lovely riding). But a good 500 (CI/AVL/UCE) is a revelation up here (& uphill), and people (of many nations) have long preferred them for touring in the Himalayas. I don't think an Israeli exists who doesn't know what a Machismo 500 is; the older Bullets - 350/500 both, don't seem to vibrate as much (maybe) as the UCE's, but anyway - I can "get" the connect. I also "get" the fact that a new RE 350 - all 180kg's of it - gets the same FE (45) as my 150cc Impulse and moves down the road about as quickly. It may be antiquated technology, but then it seems to be working. Reminds me of Chevrolet Corvettes, world-class sportscars that till very late were still using pushrod V8 engines descended from the original 1955 Chevy "smallblock" design, fifty years on still performing on-par with (or better than) a lot more "advanced" technical designs.

Before I bought my Impulse, I extensively test-rode the CL350, and for around town / lower speed highways seriously enjoyed the handling / braking / seating / sense of control. Heavy but nimble, just felt like it would do whatever I wanted it to. Only thought it vibed too much and was too underpowered on hills. Would've bought a carb'd 500 Bullet (only 1.4L in that time), but it was just out, and the wait list was too long. The Impulse, despite its being a Hero, has had more niggles than probably most Bulleteers suffer. I still like it, but the recent addition of the 500LB is really satisfying - to use a cliche - just makes me want to get out and ride.

These new twins, to sum up, seem to me to be spot-on - all the charm, simplicity, and good looks of previous Enfields, but with (apparently) bit more nimble, tossable handling; A lot more of the smoothness and power that will appeal to current-day riders, And what will be a pretty unique auditory experience, as well. Moreover a 650 is not too big, not too small. Truly the stuff of good rider/bike connections, and a superior all-rounder.

True, 3+L is going to be a stretch for most commuters, and for deep-pocketed enthusiasts, the Bonnie may appeal more - but ultimately these may do well in the market, and if reliability surpasses all previous, even many RE-bashers (which I once was) will probably end up scrambling everywhere for them.

-Eric
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Old 12th November 2017, 04:09   #123
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Default re: Royal Enfield unveils Interceptor & Continental 650 with new twin-cylinder engine. EDIT : Launched

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Originally Posted by Rob UK View Post
3 - aircooled, plus an external oil cooler, but the internal architecture of the engine also utilises the oil as a cooling fluid by pumping it around galleries in the cylinder head(s) to cool them, as well as using it for general lubrication

Its the distinction between 2 & 3 that is important, any bike which is as per 1 can be readily modified to 2, but 3 is inherently designed in.
!
Great explanations / clarifications there... though I'd still be inclined, in view of all those cooling fins, in the interest of accuracy to call #3 "air/oil cooled"...


Quote:
Originally Posted by ArizonaJim View Post
if these motorcycles are as reliable as the 2010+ Bullets they will be worth the expense of buying them. My 2011 500cc Bullet has proven to be totally reliable without any real problems. It currently has 36000+ km on it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob UK View Post
No reliability problems really seem to have arisen in the UK either. They were seen as very bad for years, but not at all in recent times, and there are way more being imported now.... India is tough on bikes - potholes, brutal speed breakers, heat and dust, cheap bikes probably suffer at the hands of inexpert mechanics - but 36k without missing a beat is quite different to what many Indians report, and I bet you don't treat it like a show pony with that sort of mileage done.Coincidence?

My theory (which anyone here can feel free to soundly refute) is that the average Bulleteer in the subcontinent was wholly addicted to that intoxicating low-rpm CI RE "thump" for a at least a couple generations. You were not supposed to rev a Bullet. You were supposed to plod along at no more than 1,000rpm's, set the idle to just above your heart-rate, and feel free to lug it down to a couple hundred while slipping the clutch mercilessly at around 5kmph in second (or maybe third) gear.

I mean, I wanted to compare my 500 Machismo to a young friend's 350 Machismo the other day, so we switched briefly. I felt his 350 was so incredibly, painfully slow in comparison, and expected he'd show up on mine with a big grin on his face. But no, he hadn't noticed the power difference. He'd not gone above about 30kmph, which is as fast as he felt like riding. He said the 500 was "not that smooth". Anyway, the heavy old cranks in CI engines, maybe even the AVL's, suited that attitude, didn't mind being lugged much, and nor did the robust clutches of yesteryear; those bikes could run reliably (if you got a good one) for as many as 100,000km's without hurting the (bike's!) bottom-ends.

Then the UCE's came out, and guess what the first and most serious problems were? Crankshafts (which were lighter in the interest of FE I suppose, and presumably not designed to be lugged down to a couple hundred rpm's), and clutches (which must also have been a bit smaller/lighter/less abuse-ready). I recall that either could go bad within five thousand km's, enraging scores of owners, especially considering that they'd just bought RE's flagship, one of the most expensive bikes available in India at the time. RE did find solutions for both these, and I'd love to know from a technical standpoint exactly what they were, if there was anything beyond actual material defects involved in those early failures. I'm noticing these days - and observations in some of the typical UCE vs. CI threads out there bear it out elsewhere - that the modern RE rider is not as interested in lugging them way down so much anymore, and a lot of the younger fellows I see around are even running / revving them quite hard. And they've got the idle speeds set pretty high, too, and don't seem to mind. That's to say that riders are getting acclimated to the new nature of the new mechanical design. It's taken a little while, though.

Apart from that there were (in 2010-up) many (and costly) issues here in India with the 500's FI system - but I gather that many of the failures were related to water getting in (via the tank cap, or perhaps tainted supplies); I can't speak for the UK, but in the U.S. (not least Arizona), bikes in general are not exposed to nearly as much rain as here in India, where besides the monsoons, you also have the reality of many bikes not being garage-kept nor exclusively kept as fair-weather rides, as most bikes the U.S. at least.

And then there were the newfangled hydraulic tappets, which for all their promise seemed to be in some cases every bit as noisy and problematic as the old mechanical ones had been... I don't have a theory on that one; I'm assuming it may have been a real flaw on RE's part, as were the starter sprags, bearing in mind that RE had only produced a few very limited-production electric-start models prior to the 500UCE (If I'm not mistaken, Electra 5s & Machismo 500 (also highly unreliable self-start).

So in that case, even the UCE was a bit too much of a technological leap, considering what a RE had always been to people, their expectations, the way it had always been started / ridden / parked - assertions of how they MUST be ridden. Thus purists hated (and hate) them - hate even the electric start; admittedly the UCE's are very different machines from anything before. They don't like to idle low (auto-decompressor starts clicking away) / lug low, while the redline (as if anyone but me cared!) is inexplicably 400 rpm LESS than the AVL's! Still, the 500 UCE's are very responsive and pleasing to ride IMO - and low-down thumping aside, put a good repro Goldstar silencer on there, and the tonality and mellow fullness of the exhaust note is almost stunning - really very nice, nice enough to almost make me give up any aspirations of a twin. But I digress...

At the same time, modern Enfields came around in the midst of a substantial economic uptrend, and the bikes suddenly became mass-market and first-time rides for many people for the first time in history. Metro-dwellers had by then probably become busier and less inclined than ever towards spending weekends fiddling with their bikes. All this probably plays into the perceptions / expectations, as well.

So to sum up, just sayin' - Reliability can sometimes be enhanced / degraded on the basis of how a bike is run, and especially the degree to which its rider is attuned to its mechanicals. And so many are not at all. How many times have people told me, "my bike's not picking up (for the last month)" when the "problem" was a mis-adjusted clutch cable. Misperceived symptoms, little misadjustments left alone too long and turning into expensive repairs. India was kind of spoiled for a long time by Splendors (former beloved ride of one CL500-owning friend here), which basically needed almost nothing, ever, in terms of attention beyond periodic oil/brake/chainset changes, and which could take a fair amount of neglect / abuse. Rurally speaking it was the Rajdoots. Bullets, even from way back, were just in a different category, and a lot of owners understood that the privilege of having one included the responsibility of understanding a bit about the mechanicals and knowing how to self-service it even, something that very few would want to do today, even if able.

Anyway, I know there were/are real issues with RE's (undeniably with with the Himalayan), but suspect that some of those were made worse by the fact of often down-in-the-dirt street mechanics, as well as relatively inexperienced riders / sometimes not well-informed owners; I know a guy here who bought an Avenger as his first bike - he absolutely loves/pampers it, washing / polishing it weekly - but managed to burn out the clutch in the first week of ownership... I'd seen him taking off from a stop with it and had known very well it would shortly come to that.

But now, reading through this thread, what I realize is that RE needs to understand very clearly that this is not the good-old-days and that practically nobody who buys their bikes is going to be interested in working on them or even making adjustments on them, much less having to get them serviced for anything between designated intervals. They get this right, they may be able to eventually woo back many from the disenchanted masses of former RE owners. Get it wrong, and they'll have to hope they can keep it moving in the (sometimes) more forgiving export markets.

-Eric
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Old 12th November 2017, 11:51   #124
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Default re: Royal Enfield unveils Interceptor & Continental 650 with new twin-cylinder engine. EDIT : Launched

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Originally Posted by jeepster View Post
The Interceptor V2 or Continental V3 could be 750cc or even 900cc+ ...

Just like UC Engines which have 350/500/535 versions.
Quote:
Originally Posted by BowMan View Post
I was initially very upbeat about the new twin from RE but I think they have been rather too cautious in their attempt and it could take the edge and excitement out of the whole endeavour.

I really think they should have made a 750 to put up something of a challenge to Triumphs and the other retro modern bikes out there or even taking the wind out of their sales rather than pussyfooting their riders with their 650. But I really hope the best for RE on their new unit. Now that they have a 650 how difficult can it be to upgrade with a few more hundred cc's. Some would say the price is still going for the RE but to me a 750 for the same or near about price would have been a much more stronger challenge by RE.
RE has a pretty clever strategy and they executed this well - they are basically aiming for European Union License A2 compliance - according to which :

1)the bikes are limited in termed of Bhp/kw - it has to be less than 47 BHP/35KW

PLUS

2)the bike have to be less than a certain bhp/kg accordingly to which the minimum weight (I think) is 175 Kg. (to eliminate super light crotch rockets)

It's designed to fulfil this and no more - and this lucrative European segment may also be the raison d'etre for the Triumph Bajaj partnership.

Unfortunately, us fanboys (I have a beautiful 13 year old Machismo 350) whining about wanting more CCs, or more BHP or less weight - may not work!
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Old 12th November 2017, 19:29   #125
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Default re: Royal Enfield unveils Interceptor & Continental 650 with new twin-cylinder engine. EDIT : Launched

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Originally Posted by Skidrow View Post
Unfortunately, us fanboys (I have a beautiful 13 year old Machismo 350) whining about wanting more CCs, or more BHP or less weight - may not work!
The way it tends to go here with bikers is like this...

Get first big bike - often 60-80bhp. Be cautious with it for a while, then open the taps and "Lord Jesus this is fast!"

Get used to it

Ride a bike with 100-120bhp. "Lord Jesus, THIS thing is insane!"

Get used to it

Ride a bike with 130+bhp. "OK, this is great - but where can I actually use it?"

We are utterly spoiled with power - you can buy as much power as you like very cheap. 5 lacs here gets you a low mileage well cared for 1000cc superbike like the R1, a 170bhp sports tourer like the K1300, or a hyperbike like the Hayabusa. Half that still buys a perfectly functional one.

But we still buy lots of slower bikes as a lot of people simply realise more is not always better. I'm perfectly happy with the 108bhp my 800c Honda provides. I've ridden faster bikes, but the power isn't really all that useful. My bike does 0-160kph in about 5.6 seconds with a perfect start. The aforementioned K1300 does it in 4.5, but so what? 5.6 seconds is still pretty ballistic, and some days I'd still rather ride my 44bhp anyway.

You don't have those sort of choices in India really, as your market is still developing. It must be frustrating.

If you did have those choices, people would, I think, be quite relaxed about the spec of the Interceptor and think "if it doesn't do what I want, there's plenty more options!" - they cannot think that, because it is not true yet, so their hopes and desires are projected onto this model, because nobody else is building bikes to plug that gap.

India seems to have this huge gaping hole in the market that manufacturers are just waking up to. You have a tiny number of guys privileged to own premium 2/3/4 cylinder models from foreign manufacturers that are 5+lacs ex-showroom for the lowliest, and more for most. For everybody else the market stops in the 1.75-2.5lac range of singles like the Dominar, Duke390 and current Enfield range. Manufacturers seem to have suddenly woken up to the idea that there is a gulf between a 2.5lac Duke and a 7lac Street Triple or a 2 lac Bullet and a 7 lac Street Twin that India's rapidly expanding middle class is waiting for them to fill.

If for example, Bajaj had announced 6 months ago they would start building the Suzuki SV650/Gladius under license in India (a compact and sporty 70bhp V-twin that has been a super cheap mainstay of world markets for years) at 3.9lac, then would so many people care how many bhp the Interceptor makes? Or would the ones saying "only 47? not enough!" instead just be queuing up at Bajaj with their deposit for a 70bhp bike the same price?

Other bikes are coming in the 2.5-5lac bracket for sure - the Interceptor cannot plug that gap alone. If it isn't quite what some long for, be patient!

I think Enfield have more to come from this powertrain if they choose to exploit it too. A 750cc version has surely been tested already.

Last edited by Rob UK : 12th November 2017 at 19:31.
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Old 12th November 2017, 19:35   #126
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Default re: Royal Enfield unveils Interceptor & Continental 650 with new twin-cylinder engine. EDIT : Launched

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob UK View Post
Anybody criticising RE for going SOHC on an 8v twin is simply revealing their own ignorance of bike engineering.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Urban_Nomad View Post
Since I was the one to bring up the SOHC bit, I guess this is directed at me.
I call dibs!
http://www.team-bhp.com/forum/motorb...ml#post4300818

@Rob: - Pros and cons of a DOHC/ 4V setup (as opposed to SOHC/ 4v) for a modern clean sheet design engine?
Criticism - Not really (but essentially one does not expect much from RE. Pretty low bar). But will you allow me to be/ remain perplexed?
I don't see RE having a stable of engines. Each of their engines have to cover a lot of bases. For many years.

Regards
Sutripta

Last edited by Sutripta : 12th November 2017 at 19:42.
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Old 13th November 2017, 02:17   #127
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Default re: Royal Enfield unveils Interceptor & Continental 650 with new twin-cylinder engine. EDIT : Launched

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sutripta View Post
I call dibs!
http://www.team-bhp.com/forum/motorb...ml#post4300818

@Rob: - Pros and cons of a DOHC/ 4V setup (as opposed to SOHC/ 4v) for a modern clean sheet design engine?
Criticism - Not really (but essentially one does not expect much from RE. Pretty low bar). But will you allow me to be/ remain perplexed?
I don't see RE having a stable of engines. Each of their engines have to cover a lot of bases. For many years.

Regards
Sutripta

Pros:

Packaging - this is arguably the biggest one with bikes. Much more space efficient.

Looks - see above, but the engine proportions are much more like an old skool OHV engine, giving nice clean lines. Important on a bike like the Bonnie or Interceptor where everything is on show.

Weight - lighter & not just in absolute terms but also where the weight is carried on a parallel twin. A bike leans side to side from the ground. The higher any weight is carried in the frame, the more it contributes to making the bike 'feel' heavy and the more force it exerts on the bike with any lean, so the more the bike resists flicking side to side. Honda have become very obsessive about "mass centralisation" on their bikes, ensuring weight is carried in the middle of the bike as low as possible.

Cons:

Positioning - the valve stems have to be closer to the cam restricting the angle the valves can be placed at

Accuracy - the cam acts on the valve via a rocker not directly, so there are 2 contact points requiring clearance, not one. Play therefore probably develops faster.

Wear - typically, each cam lobe acts on 2 valves, so is acting against against 2 springs, probably larger contact patch & more force on the surface of each lobe.

The last two points are minor, the first is a design limitation. The arrangement is fairly neutral in terms of parasitic power loss vs DOHC.

Last edited by Rob UK : 13th November 2017 at 02:18.
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Old 13th November 2017, 06:20   #128
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Default re: Royal Enfield unveils Interceptor & Continental 650 with new twin-cylinder engine. EDIT : Launched

More power is useless. Unless for bragging rights. Or that quick getaway at a signal. Let me explain. My friend shared a screenshot of his riding antics recently. He riding on a high power superbike did Hampi to Hyderabad (390km) in about 9.30 hours.. and highlighted was his top speed achived.. a whopping 289kmph. IMO completely retarded and stupid reckless riding. Average speed? A pathetic 44kmph!!
I did Hampi Hyderabad a couple of months back in my car, speeds were between 90 and 110kmph.. average speed was about 70kmph and in far greater comfort and not to mention far far safer.
A 47bhp bike is more than enough for long distance touring. A naked superbike on the other hand is good for posing or taking butt breaks every 50/100 kms and torturing yourself just to set a riding record

Last edited by apachelongbow : 13th November 2017 at 06:26.
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Old 13th November 2017, 07:04   #129
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Default re: Royal Enfield unveils Interceptor & Continental 650 with new twin-cylinder engine. EDIT : Launched

Lets make it simple......

A young man behaving like an old man should go for Enfield
&
The same goes for the old man.

If you want to buy an RE just forget about NFS.
Cheers
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Old 13th November 2017, 10:01   #130
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Default re: Royal Enfield unveils Interceptor & Continental 650 with new twin-cylinder engine. EDIT : Launched

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Originally Posted by apachelongbow View Post
.. and highlighted was his top speed achived.. a whopping 289kmph. IMO completely retarded and stupid reckless riding. Average speed? A pathetic 44kmph!!
Sorry for going OT but purely out of curiosity, which bike was this? And 44kmph average speed is completely understandable on that road, its filled with speed breakers!

I seriously don't get the debate for more power. I don't think any owner of a large superbike uses all of its power. Heck, even the 44hp duke is a handful and full throttle still feels as scary as that on 80hp bike. 47hp is enough for all intents and purposes.

The only thing worthy of a debate is how reliable these new bikes will be, but that cannot be argued until these bikes come to the showrooms.
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Old 13th November 2017, 13:24   #131
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Default re: Royal Enfield unveils Interceptor & Continental 650 with new twin-cylinder engine. EDIT : Launched

We are all here spending time reading and writing posts because we love Royal Enfield. No one is trying to beat it down and am sure we all want the new 650 twins to do well. A bit of skepticism comes from the fact that we have been always treated as second-hand citizens in our own country and by our own people. C5 was launched in Europe first and brought to India only couple of years later. That too with critical system parts such as lembda sensor eliminated and we all know the resultant plethora of issues that followed, very well captured in Randhawas C5 thread on this very teambhp. RE does same with 650 twins, which will be brought to India "Later" as if we are not ready for it.
Not stressing on that fact as there are strategies to follow but in general, reliability is still a big ? with RE. Indian riding conditions are different then those in EU or Oz and Jim mentioned, its very difficult for REs to run for 36k kms without issues here. Fact is also that REs being exported from India are of better quality & inspection to meet the standards, be it tyres, EFI or ABS. as if Indian life is of less value.
Last night, was taking a walk outside my apartment. On the dimly lit road, saw a couple of guys struggling with a C5 Desert storm, right side triangular box open, fiddling with electricals. And that is a very common sight on our roads with it comes to REs.
So when it came to price speculations for the 650 twins, a lot of us were 'cool' with it being around 5L mark, where as many thought that to be unrealistic and too high and 3.5L as better suited. These are part and parcel of any new launch and to keep the thread hot untill the product is available for test rides.
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Old 13th November 2017, 14:00   #132
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Default re: Royal Enfield unveils Interceptor & Continental 650 with new twin-cylinder engine. EDIT : Launched

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Originally Posted by nasirkaka View Post
Not stressing on that fact as there are strategies to follow but in general, reliability is still a big ? with RE. Indian riding conditions are different then those in EU or Oz and Jim mentioned, its very difficult for REs to run for 36k kms without issues here. Fact is also that REs being exported from India are of better quality & inspection to meet the standards, be it tyres, EFI or ABS. as if Indian life is of less value.
They are a bit better but still not anywhere near reliable even to foreign junta. Take a look at this thread where RE forced a customer to delete his posts about a really bad experience. Majority of the commenters are from the USA, and there is resounding complain of bad build quality by hundreds of disgruntled customers.

I am in no way against RE as a company, but they really REALLY need to improve their customer relations and QC.

I just pray RE wants to turn a new leaf with the 650, because the interceptor looks really beautiful, better than a bonnie or the street twin IMO.
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Old 13th November 2017, 14:23   #133
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Default re: Royal Enfield unveils Interceptor & Continental 650 with new twin-cylinder engine. EDIT : Launched

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Originally Posted by nasirkaka View Post
That too with critical system parts such as lembda sensor eliminated and we all know the resultant plethora of issues that followed, very well captured in Randhawas C5 thread on this very teambhp.
Very well said and agreed to that. RE has always given a step motherly treatment to India. Is the Lambda sensor also called as the O2 sensor which is placed at the exhaust? If yes, then the new Himalayan has it.
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Old 13th November 2017, 14:51   #134
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Default re: Royal Enfield unveils Interceptor & Continental 650 with new twin-cylinder engine. EDIT : Launched

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Originally Posted by apachelongbow View Post
A 47bhp bike is more than enough for long distance touring. A naked superbike on the other hand is good for posing or taking butt breaks every 50/100 kms and torturing yourself just to set a riding record
If one can cruise around 120KMPH easily without stretching the engine, that is more than enough.
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Old 13th November 2017, 15:04   #135
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Default re: Royal Enfield unveils Interceptor & Continental 650 with new twin-cylinder engine. EDIT : Launched

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Originally Posted by nasirkaka View Post
So when it came to price speculations for the 650 twins, a lot of us were 'cool' with it being around 5L mark, where as many thought that to be unrealistic and too high and 3.5L as better suited. These are part and parcel of any new launch and to keep the thread hot untill the product is available for test rides.
I think there are two sets of people and you are confused with them both. First set says it should be 5L mark and I doubt whether they owned an RE. Second set says it should be around 3.5L and again stands up RE when people say it unreliable. I also own RE and I feel it is far-fetched when you say "Broke Down REs is common sight" in Bangalore

Mods, Please merge it with the earlier post. I made a mistake.

Last edited by jaganpec2002 : 13th November 2017 at 15:06.
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