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Old 1st February 2021, 18:24   #1
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Default Ride to the Rann - A Vagabond's tale

“You don’t stop riding when you get old, you get old when you stop riding“
-Anonymous


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Prologue

It is interesting and sometimes funny to see people’s reaction when you tell them about an upcoming bike trip. Here’s some from personal experience:
“Why don’t you take the car, it’s safer and more relaxing” – I have a celerio; it strikes out on both counts!
“Why not public transport?” – Where’s the fun in that?
“Are you crazy to do such a long bike trip!! Why do you want to do such things?”
This last one is a difficult one. It’s hard to make someone who has not spent enough time in the saddle understand why bike trips are so much fun.

It’s hard to convince your retired parents, who are used to snugly sip their tea in the mornings why a bone chilling early morning ride is so much more refreshing.

It’s hard to convince those who sit at home, closing the doors and windows to prevent the cool breeze from flowing through the house how it makes sense to do triple digit speeds on a street bike with no wind protection.

It’s hard to convince those who are so used to the monotony of the office commute that they have forgotten what acceleration and braking feels like. How it feels to have the bike lurch forward under heavy acceleration and how the front end dips under hard braking.

Enough about convincing others, let me tell you why I do it.
Firstly, I do it because I can. A lot of things have to fall in place – financially, physically, emotionally for such a trip to become a reality. Things have been falling in place for me and I thank the almighty for his eternal blessings.

Secondly, a bike trip offers a connection with the elements like no other. Be it the early morning chill, the sweltering heat of the day or the cool breeze in the evening, you feel it all while on the bike. Add to this the added bonus of treating yourself gastronomically and meeting and seeing a whole lot of different people and places on the way and you have yourself a really potent and enriching experience.


Planning

My friend and I had done a week long ride towards the end of 2019 (my laziness is the cause for the non-existent travelogue) and we decided to keep up the tradition for 2020 also. But in keeping up with the spirit of the year that 2020 was, our schedules made sure that the earliest possible slot was in January of 2021. We decided to have a slightly longer ride this time around and agreed to take a full two weeks off work in the middle of January 2021.

The following routes were considered: (I stay in Pune while my friend in Bangalore)
1. Ride along the western coastal highway (NH 66) into Kerala and then decide on places to visit once you get there
2. Eastern coastal highway
3. Rann of Kutch in Gujarat

We selected Gujarat since it was the right season to visit the Rann and the good quality highways would make it easier for a longer tour.
It was decided to start from Pune on the 16th of January and return on the 27th
My friend would ride into Pune a week in advance – work from home does have its fair share of benefits

One of the learnings from our past trip was not to make hotel bookings unless there is a fear of them being sold out. Hence we decided to make bookings only for the stay in the Rann, the rest of the hotel bookings would be made on the way / directly at the hotel once we reach there. We did not expect too much crowd due to Covid and even the websites that we checked showed good availability for the dates on which we were travelling.

This was our initial plan
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Bike and Gear prep

Following additions were made to the riding gear
1. Full gauntlet gloves – Rynox Storm Evo 2 (Wanted to go in for the Viaterra Grid but I found the fit of the Rynox better)
2. Hydration backpack – Raida
3. Touring balaclava – Raida
The bike was in decent shape. It had done close to 22,000 kms in a little over two years. It needed a new chain set and a front brake overhaul. Got that done along with a full service at the FNG close to my place a week before I was due to start. It felt much better with the new chain set and the serviced front brake.
I tested out the bike and the new gear during a team BHP breakfast ride to Wai (200 kms return journey) on the weekend prior to the start of the trip, all was fine.

The packing as always was left to the very last day. I do not have a dedicated tail bag set up for my bike – I’m one of those old strap the bag to the rear seat with bungee cords kind of guy. I initially packed everything into the bag which was used for my previous ride. This turned out to be a mistake, for it seemed quite unstable on the bike. I figured this out once I did a test mount.

This is how it looked – notice how tall it rose above the seat. Also, I was not comfortable with the cords having no protection against rolling forwards / backwards

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This is when I had to unpack and transfer everything into a bigger bag – this was one which was purchased for the ladakh trip of 2018 and had been hardly used since. Everything fit comfortably into this one and this also had a horizontal pocket which would prevent the cord from sliding off it.

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This is how the final set up looked like.

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Day 1, Saturday, 16th January – 6AM - All set to go

The plan was to pass Mumbai as soon as possible and hence avoid traffic. If all went as per plan, we were to have breakfast after the vasai creek bridge around 9:30 am. But our best laid plans were put aside by the ominous Panvel traffic at Shilphata. I remember hitting the jam at 9am and we spent the next 45 minutes crawling about in the company of trucks.
Learning from this whole episode – There is a very nice road that bypasses Panvel and all this mess, please do that that whenever you are passing through.

Chai break after lonavala – A friend of mine accompanied us till here.

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Breakfast stop – After the vasai bridge. Food quality was not too great but we were not complaining for we were happy to have passed the huge traffic jam

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The rest of the ride for the day was uneventful. No traffic issues anymore and we were able to cruise along comfortably.

Lunch stop at Sugar n Spice, just after Valsad.

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Our stop for the day, Hotel Novus, Bharuch

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Running for the day
This would turn out to be the highest single day run during the trip

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Day 2, Sunday, January 17th
Plan: Bharuch – Patan via Ahmedabad


The day’s plan was to ride from Bharuch to Patan with a short stop at Ahmedabad. We started off at 7am and were greeted with a little bit of fog on the highway upto Ahmedabad. We had some good company in the form of some enthusiastic bikers who were out on their weekend ride.

Water break at one of the tolls

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The Hotel that we stayed in Patan

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We reached Patan around 3 pm and headed out towards the famous Rani ki Vaav after a quick lunch break. The site has been wonderfully maintained by the authorities has is supremely clean. Being a Sunday there was a good number of visitors and the caretakers had a hard time preventing people from touching the sculptures. I’ll let the pictures do the talking now.

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Day 3, Monday, 18th January

Plan – Patan to Dholavira

We were all excited for today’s ride for we would be getting our first glimpse of the white rann today. The straight piece of road with the rann on both sides was something that we were looking forward to. Google maps took us through some small internal roads as we were exiting Patan. These roads passed by many villages and were in excellent condition. The weather was just perfect, not too cold and no fog so we continued to ride on without any major breaks.
Stopped for breakfast at one of the ‘Honest’ chain of restaurants on the highway. Had the famous fafda and samosa.


Start of the last 100 kms

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Mobbed by cows

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The straight road through the rann

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Pictures cannot explain the feeling that you get when you pass over the small incline and then see the rann for the first time. This area is actually called the ‘Little Rann’ or the ‘Rann of Kutch Lake’. Although the roads are in good condition, the distance from other touristy places prevents people from visiting Dholavira which is the reason why it was so sparsely populated with people like us. But we were not complaining at all and were enjoying the natural beauty that the place had to offer.
Although it was close to 1pm it wasn’t too hot. We found a small lay bye on the road where we parked our bikes and ventured out into the ‘crispy’ white rann.

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There are patches of water like this at many places. It seems to be rainwater that is yet to evaporate. Cannot figure out the reason behind the greenish color though!

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After having spent a good half hour stamping about in the salt, clicking pictures and making video calls to family back home we started towards our destination in dholavira. We had the entire place to ourselves, not a single soul was in sight. We were mulling this over in our heads during the final few kilometers into Dholavira. I guess the reason for this is the distance between Dholavira and other popular destinations such as Bhuj and Patan. It is almost a 6 hour drive from both these places. This would definitely be reducing in the near future for there is a road which is being built through the rann which will connect Bhuj with Dholavira. This road when built would reduce the travel time by three hours.

Places of interest in Dholavira:
1. The main harappan site and museum
2. Flamingo point
3. Sunset point
4. Fossil park

We covered all the points except the main site on the day that we reached Dholavira.

This is the rann of kutch lake. It gets full during the monsoon and the water is supposedly only knee deep. We could see flamingoes walking about in the water hunting for food.

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First sighting of flamingoes - they are a magnificent sight!

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Next we headed to the sunset point – this is a place where the water in the rann has evaporated so you can drive into the rann for a fair bit of distance. There is no road to get to this point – you need to ride through sand. We had a good time slipping and sliding all over the place enroute to this view point.

Again, we had the entire place to ourselves.

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The weight of the interceptor would cause the side stand to dig into the loose mud. So we came up with another way to park it!

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More flamingoes. They head over to their resting place for the night

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Last edited by suhaas307 : 8th April 2021 at 14:46. Reason: As requested
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Old 2nd March 2021, 20:54   #2
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Default Re: Ride to the Rann - A Vagabond's tale

Day 4, Tuesday, 19th January
Plan – Visit the Harappan site and museum, ride to Bhuj


The Harappan site has a very detailed tank and canal system. It has fascinating to see how people back then were able to use gravity to stock up on water. Most of the site is still underground as per our guide. The government just stopped digging when the funds ran out!
All said and done, one surely marvels at the engineering and artistic skill of the harappans by seeing the ruins for their civilization.

main water tank at the outskirts of the city

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homestay
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enroute to bhuj
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Day 5, Wednesday, 20th January
Plan – Local sightseeing in Bhuj, Ride to Hodko, Kalo Dungar and White Rann


Our plan kept evolving each day. We were supposed to spend 2 days each in Dholavira as well as Bhuj. But since we were able to cover all the points of interest, it didn’t make sense to spend that extra day. Moreover, since we did not have any stay reservations, we were free to pack up and hit the road. Thus we ended up riding continuously for 7 days!



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Old 7th April 2021, 10:41   #3
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Default Re: Ride to the Rann - A Vagabond's tale

We also visited the Aina & Prag Mahals. Did not click any pictures but some of the artwork on display is pretty cool. There are some stalls selling local handicrafts (sarees, dress materials, purses, wallets etc.) right outside this place. We picked up some gifts for the ladies back home from here.

Next we rode to our halt for the day – Hotel Desert King. This is in a place called Hodko which is just 70kms from Bhuj. We reached there by lunch time and enjoyed some great kathiyavadi food at the hotel. This was by far the best place we stayed in during the entire trip. It was also the most expensive at 5000 per night!
These circular mud structures are called Bhungas and they keep the insides cool during the day and warm during the nights. Pretty cool stuff.

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Next we rode to the Kalo Dungar – the highest point in Bhuj. This was a big let-down. Overcrowded, overhyped and unclean. We must not have spent more than 15 minutes here and headed for the star attraction of our trip – the great Rann of Kutch.
After having been smitten by the little Rann of Kutch, we were looking forward to the Great Rann. But alas, we were disappointed. What we expected was to see an endless sea of white sand with a clear blue sky, what we got to see instead was a marshy looking place teeming with people and animals. It was nowhere close to the serenity of the little rann.

High spirits
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Pristine beauty?
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It was very marshy
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We passed time until sunset by snacking at the cafeteria near the entry gate. This turned out to be a mistake since there was a much bigger and better food arena at a small distance near the tent city. We headed back after sunset to our bhungas to retire for the night. It was quite chilly and the hotel manager was kind enough to light up a fire for us while we waited for dinner.


Day 6, Thursday, 21st January
Plan – Ride to Gir sanctuary


A visit to Gir was not part of our original itinerary. It was suggested by a friend and we decided to try it out. While the original plan was to ride from the Rann straight to Diu, the revised one meant that we stopped at Gir which was more or less on the way. Being on the western coast of the country means that daybreak is pretty late – hence it was almost 7am when we started from our hotel in Hodko. There was a slight nip in the air but I was prepared and was wearing a layer of thermals. While the thermals took care of the body, there was no protection for the hands. Such was the intensity of the cold that my full gauntlet gloves held up for only about half an hour. I was reminded of my ladakh trip back in 2018 and the cold at Pangong Lake. The next hour or so was utterly miserable – my fingers were numb from the cold and the rest of my body too was slowly following suit. Other than the cold the morning ride was superb – wonderful roads, sparse traffic and a rising run to keep us company.
We covered ground briskly and stopped only for fuel on the way. We reached Junagadh (which is hardly 40 Kms from Gir) by around 1pm and had a quick lunch at an Honest outlet.

Our halt for the night – it was a sort of a nature camp in the middle of a mangrove. There was also a stream running alongside the entire camp.

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Day 7, Friday, 22nd January
Plan – Jungle Safari, Ride to Diu


Day 7 did not start too well. We woke up late. We were supposed to reach the safari start point by 7:45 and we were still in bed at 7:30. To make matters worse we ended up at the wrong start point! Let me explain:
You need a permit for the safari which is available online. We booked ours on the preceding day while having lunch at Honest. The permit costs Rs. 800 for two people. We were under the impression that that was it and were looking forward to the safari on the next day. What we missed reading are the details of the start point. The permit clearly stated that the start point of the safari is Sasan Gir – this is the same place where we took a brief stop on our way to our hotel the previous day. We ended up reporting directly to Devalia (which is 20 Kms from Sasan Gir). That is where we understood our blunder. The safari starts from Sasan Gir – that is where all the Maruti Gypsy’s are stationed. In addition to the 800 for the permit, you also need to pay for the Gypsy (2500) and the guide (1500), so a total of 4000 extra. The Gypsy then rides from Sasan to Devalia and undertakes the safari.
We were kicking ourselves at this blunder and had to undertake the bus safari – which was the only available option at Devalia. The worst was when we saw the 8 am safari’s go past us as we were waiting for the bus to fill up – and there was one safari that had two empty seats!

The bus safari was not bad, the only drawback is that you don’t get too close to the lions. I for one was quite pleased with this development. I firmly believe that we should let the wild animals be and should not go intruding into their privacy.

Some of the pictures that we managed to take during the bus safari:

The Mr. and the missus enjoying an early morning snooze
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Clearly Mr. had no intention of posing for us
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Spotted deer. Saw a lot of these on the safari
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Other than these we saw leopards and some wild bulls.

The safari lasted around 45 minutes and we were back at the hotel by 9:30.
A quick breakfast and we were ready to leave to our next destination – Diu

Diu is hardly an hour and a half from Gir. The ride was un-eventful and we checked into our hotel which we had booked the previous night.
It was very hot in Diu. And what better to cool off than some beer and seafood.

Squid @ O'Coqueiro, Highly recommended place
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We checked out the Diu fort in the evening. It’s has been maintained very well and the fact that it is right on the sea shore adds to the charm of the place. The only grouse that I have is that there were a couple of ATV’s plying as taxis inside the fort and they made a huge ruckus which disturbs the otherwise peaceful atmosphere inside the fort.
We found ourselves a nice spot on top of one of the many towers thinking of enjoying the sunset but that was not to be – the fort closes down at 6pm!
Some pictures taken at the fort:

Entrance to the fort
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For unwelcome visitors from the sea
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Would be quite a welcome
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More cannons
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Quite a lot of greenery within the fort
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One of many fishing boats parked in the harbor
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Day 8, Saturday, 23rd January
Plan – Local sightseeing in Diu


Our plan kept evolving each day. We were supposed to spend 2 days each in Dholavira as well as Bhuj. But since we were able to cover all the points of interest, it didn’t make sense to spend that extra day. Moreover, since we did not have any stay reservations, we were free to pack up and hit the road. Thus we ended up riding continuously for 7 days!
The tiredness had begun to set in and we were tired of riding. Hence it was decided to take it easy and cover only a few points of interest in Diu.

Saw this old church that had been converted into a Museum on our way to INS Khukri. That’s my friend posing on ‘Dreadnought’ (That is what he calls his bike – he is not on team BHP else you could have asked him for the reasoning behind this ‘Dread’ful name!)
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Another place enroute. This was called the heritage walk. Not too long, just a small walk along the sea
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The beautiful memorial for INS Khukri. Really well designed. A must visit place while in Diu

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Nadia caves – I was very eager to visit this place after seeing the images on google but alas, that was not to be. The whole place was shut down. 

So that meant that we were done with our sightseeing in Diu – in about 3 hours!
Next we decided to head to Nagoa beach for some beer and sea food, but unfortunately the places on the beach are all ‘family friendly’. We had to move slightly away to get something of our choice.

Local fresh fish on a hot day – the simple pleasures of life.

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Didn’t do much for the rest of the day. It was spent in planning for the return journey – we decided to try the RO-RO (Roll on, Roll off) ferry across the Gulf of Khambat

Last edited by CrAzY dRiVeR : 8th April 2021 at 14:57. Reason: Rule #11. Strictly no mention of alcohol please.
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Old 7th April 2021, 10:51   #4
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Day 9, Sunday, 24th January
Plan – Return journey, Leg 1 – Ro Ro Ferry


Ro-Ro ferry – We booked seats on the Indigo Seaways ferry that shuttles between Ghogha (west coast) and Dahej (East coast) of the Gulf of Khambat. It starts from Ghogha at 2 pm and is supposed to reach Dahej by 6 pm. This reduced our riding by almost 250 Kms, which meant 4-5 hours of rest.

This shows the road travel saved by the ferry.
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Google maps was avoiding NH 51 for some reason.
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Our experience of riding in Gujarat had so far been excellent hence we decided not to follow Google’s recommendation and switched onto NH51 after Una. This turned out to be a major mistake. NH51 is in the process of getting upgraded, there are patches of good concrete roads interspersed with patches with monster potholes. We struggled as we carried on like this for almost an hour after which we decided to leave the highway and take some internal roads. We rode through some extremely narrow but scenic roads through the villages. It was a welcome relief after the terrible road conditions in NH51.

We reached the ferry terminal around noon and had a good couple of hours to spare. There was nothing much to do at the facility other than wait. Even the cafeteria is more like a kiosk that sells only snacks.
The ferry coming from Dahej berthed at around 12:45 and we could see all kinds of vehicles from two wheelers to multi axle trucks rolling out of the ferry. I counted at least 20 trucks while having a couple of samosas.

Our boarding began at 1:30pm and it was quite a smooth process – Collect a wrist band from the counter, ride up to the parking and then climb upwards onto the deck which had the seats.

Parked for the ferry ride. I thought the bikes would be secured firmly by some lashings but that was not the case.
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A redimix truck struggling to park
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Once the lower deck is full the rest of the cars are parked on the upper deck.
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Tug boats pulling the ferry out of the harbor
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Upper deck. Lots of free space to roam about. They have a decent canteen service at the lower deck from where you can get yourself some snacks and lounge on the upper deck. The wind ensures that you don’t feel the heat of the afternoon too much.
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The sunset was memorable. One of the most beautiful ones that I have ever seen
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Almost at hazira
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Overall impressions of the ferry service – Quite decent. The upkeep and maintenance of the ferry could have been better. The sitting area was a bit unclean and had remnants of food from the onward trip – I guess they clean after every round trip.
The speed of the ferry is very slow. We left around 2:45 and it was almost 6:30 by the time we reached.
The last 30 minutes are excruciatingly slow as the ferry orients itself at the harbor to get ready to unload its cargo.
Overall, it’s definitely a one-time experience that you should try out if you are close by.

Our stop of the night was at Valsad. The ride from Hazira to Valsad took about 2 hours including a fuel stop. We filled up at a BPCL pump bang opposite the hazira refinery. The sight of a flare against the backdrop of a clear night sky was truly amazing.

Day 10, Monday, 25th January
Plan – Return journey, Leg 2


Fuelling up for the final leg of our journey - Our friend (who is a localite) took us to this amazing place on the highway where we enjoyed a scrumptious breakfast.
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We hit the road around 10am and covered ground quite briskly. Since breakfast was quite filling we decided to have a late lunch – probably somewhere after Bombay. The first major traffic jam that we hit was at the vasai bridge. God knows when there would be 2 way traffic on this bridge. I remember the situation being the same back in 2017 when I did a Pune – Ahmedabad trip. Not much had changed in 4 years. It took us almost 20 minutes to cross the bridge; the heat and humidity of Bombay didn’t help us either.

To make matters worse my friend got lost – I was the one navigating and he lost sight of me at some signal and then took a wrong turn that took him in the opposite direction. Pretty clear business case made for a Bluetooth communications device to be procured before our next trip! This cost us around 30 minutes and we regrouped on the Sion-Panvel expressway and continued onward to Pune.

Lunch at the famous Sunny da Dhaba
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Back home. Final trip reading 2816 Kms. This had been an epic ride!
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Thanks for reading, Until the next one, ride safe.

Last edited by jomson13 : 7th April 2021 at 19:03. Reason: correction
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Old 8th April 2021, 07:03   #5
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Thread moved out from the Assembly Line. Thanks for sharing!
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Old 8th April 2021, 10:05   #6
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Default Re: Ride to the Rann - A Vagabond's tale

Awesome trip and a great write up with some brilliant pictures. I always wanted to do the Kutch trip when I was residing in Nashik, but never did the trip. Some friends said, the sight of full moon from the white floor feels magical - did you get to see that?

Your trip had a bit of experience in almost everything - History - modern and old, geography, nature and wildlife, art (sculptures), food.

I didn't understand the below image - What are these?

Ride to the Rann - A Vagabond's tale-capture.jpg

Also, What was the ferry cost for bikes?

Last edited by saikarthik : 8th April 2021 at 10:28.
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Old 8th April 2021, 11:38   #7
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Default Re: Ride to the Rann - A Vagabond's tale

Did you guys take the route from Ropar to Dholavira? I'm interested to know how did the interceptor manage the fuel from Ropar to Dholavira, in case you took that route.

No comments on the posts...it simply brought back my own memories of riding across the West coast in 2013 covering Dholavira & Rann & I'm so happy for you to have done those places.
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Old 8th April 2021, 12:23   #8
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Default Re: Ride to the Rann - A Vagabond's tale

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Originally Posted by saikarthik View Post
Some friends said, the sight of full moon from the white floor feels magical - did you get to see that?

I didn't understand the below image - What are these?

Also, What was the ferry cost for bikes?
Thanks Saikarthik, we missed the full moon (I think it was around 28 Jan) since my friend needed to be back before the end of the month. I too have read a lot about how the Rann looks under the full moon, but I guess that would have to wait.

I too am not sure about the image - It seemed to be some sort of water conservation effort but I may be wrong.

The ferry costs around 900. This is inclusive of the passenger and the bike.

Quote:
Originally Posted by aargee View Post
Did you guys take the route from Ropar to Dholavira? I'm interested to know how did the interceptor manage the fuel from Ropar to Dholavira, in case you took that route.

No comments on the posts...it simply brought back my own memories of riding across the West coast in 2013 covering Dholavira & Rann & I'm so happy for you to have done those places.
Thank you Aargee. There is a Reliance pertrol pump on the main road from where one of the roads leads to Dholavira. Dholavira is around 100kms from there, Ropar is around 70 kms from Dholavira I guess. The interceptor filled up on both occasions (while going into Dholavira and on the way back) at the Reliance petrol pump.
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Old 8th April 2021, 13:14   #9
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Originally Posted by jomson13 View Post
Thank you Aargee. There is a Reliance pertrol pump on the main road from where one of the roads leads to Dholavira. Dholavira is around 100kms from there, Ropar is around 70 kms from Dholavira I guess. The interceptor filled up on both occasions (while going into Dholavira and on the way back) at the Reliance petrol pump.
This is why I wanted to know specifically on that route

I had a tough time especially I was with a big group of 100+ folks in atleast 30 cars & they were able to easily manage from morning cutting through Zainabad to Adhesar via ROK & then we stopped somewhere midway for lunch. And I was left only with half the tank; and everyone started proceeding towards Dholavira.

I had a choice to make...
1. Either risk riding to Dholavira, be brave, use fuel sold in bottles at petty shops enroute
2. Ride to Ropar, refuel to brim & have the confidence of riding to Dholavira & back to Ropar

Obviously I made the latter decision & I'm glad. And that was C250R yielding over 32+ Kmpl on highway.

So I was wondering how Interceptor handled in that segment. Glad to know Reliance made use of that opportunity.

Fun fact - One of the compelling reason for me to ride to Ropar was the price of fuel sold in bottles at petty shops. It was Rs 70 per liter (It was just Rs. 5 more than the pump) And I needed atleast 4 liters, which means atleast Rs 20 more, which I could not accept. Moreover, concern was on adulterated fuel as well, so I gave more importance to peace of mind.
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Old 8th April 2021, 14:39   #10
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Default Re: Ride to the Rann - A Vagabond's tale

jomson13, that was a very enjoyable travelogue. It definitely looked like you guys had a lot of fun over those few days of riding.

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Originally Posted by jomson13 View Post
The weight of the interceptor would cause the side stand to dig into the loose mud. So we came up with another way to park it!
Ride to the Rann - A Vagabond's tale-img_6758.jpg

Your picture of the Interceptor getting stuck in the loose mud...

Ride to the Rann - A Vagabond's tale-img85051920x1080.jpg

...brought a smile to my face as it reminded me of when I had taken my Continental GT 535 on a river bed and it could be propped up the same way. This is a picture from when it got really stuck!

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This is when I had to unpack and transfer everything into a bigger bag – this was one which was purchased for the ladakh trip of 2018 and had been hardly used since. Everything fit comfortably into this one and this also had a horizontal pocket which would prevent the cord from sliding off it.
That setup does look to be dangerous because the bag completely covers your brake lights. People in vehicles behind you will not know that you have braked and that increases your chances of getting rear ended. It would have been a lot safer if the bag was laid from side to side instead.
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Old 8th April 2021, 19:15   #11
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Default Re: Ride to the Rann - A Vagabond's tale

Wonderful travelogue and beautiful pictures, Jomson. Kudos to your enthusiasm.

For Panvel traffic, you always use Uran phata bypass to skip Panvel if using old highway
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Old 8th April 2021, 21:23   #12
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Default Re: Ride to the Rann - A Vagabond's tale

Very well penned. With the pandemic not ending soon travelogues like this is a solace for people like me who still fears to venture out.
My better half has been planning for Rann utsav for the past several years but unfortunately its still only on paper.
I never expected the ferry to be this huge.
The bag seems to be sagging out too much from behind, did that by any chance affect the ride?

-VJ
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Old 8th April 2021, 22:52   #13
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Default Re: Ride to the Rann - A Vagabond's tale

Superb travelogue!!! The western part of India is in my bucket list for long and will plan to post the pandemic. Thanks for keeping that desire alive
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Old 9th April 2021, 09:56   #14
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What a first pic to start this thread, brilliant!

I echo the safety concern. Your luggage is blocking tale lamps.
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Old 9th April 2021, 11:28   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by neil.jericho View Post

...brought a smile to my face as it reminded me of when I had taken my Continental GT 535 on a river bed and it could be propped up the same way. This is a picture from when it got really stuck! Such activities are always good fun. Cleaning the chain afterwards - not so much!

That setup does look to be dangerous because the bag completely covers your brake lights. People in vehicles behind you will not know that you have braked and that increases your chances of getting rear ended. It would have been a lot safer if the bag was laid from side to side instead.
Quote:
Originally Posted by vijay_jambu View Post
The bag seems to be sagging out too much from behind, did that by any chance affect the ride?

-VJ
Quote:
Originally Posted by IP_Man View Post
What a first pic to start this thread, brilliant!

I echo the safety concern. Your luggage is blocking tale lamps.
My co rider pointed out the bag blocking the tail light at our very first stop. That is when I realized that I hadn't thought it through.
I did not pack any rope with me else I could have pulled up the sagging part and tied it to one of the bungee cords.

Thankfully nothing untoward happened but this was a lesson learnt.
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