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Old 19th August 2004, 18:28   #16
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Quote:
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Quote[/b] (rtech @ Aug. 19 2004,15:31)]
Quote:
Originally Posted by [b
Quote[/b] ]Did not know that the heat could do permanent-ish damage to the pads (as opposed to only hi-temp brakefade)!
Well, its not really permanent. You can sand it off!!
thats why i said permanent-ish.....

Quote:
Originally Posted by [b
Quote[/b] ]The other layer of the pad gets a mirror smooth finish which isnt as effective. Also, instead of speed being lost to friction, its being lost to heat which makes is less effective for stopping the car!
Correct me if im wrong, but isnt it that speed is converted to heat DUE to the friction.
So mirror smooth finish = less friction = less speed lost.

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Quote[/b] ]
As far as the shocks go, it should be a simple swap job.
Cool....will see if its worth it at a later service....

cya
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Old 19th August 2004, 19:17   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by [b
Quote[/b] ]Quote
The other layer of the pad gets a mirror smooth finish which isnt as effective. Also, instead of speed being lost to friction, its being lost to heat which makes is less effective for stopping the car!

Correct me if im wrong, but isnt it that speed is converted to heat DUE to the friction.
So mirror smooth finish = less friction = less speed lost.
Well, this is another one of those things that I know in my head, but when it comes to putting it down on paper, or the PC in this case, I kinda lose the plot! So, with some assistance, this is basically what I meant...

"All friction material (the materials brake pads are made of) has a coefficient of friction curve over temperature. Friction materials have an optimal working temperature where the coefficient of friction is the highest. Sometimes you can use the brakes so hard that you get the temperature over the point of maximum friction to where the coefficient of friction curve starts to decline. "

For more detailed info on the reason behind brake fades, check out this link!

Rt

Last edited by Rehaan : 14th March 2008 at 23:15. Reason: Link corrected.
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Old 20th August 2004, 00:23   #18
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Hey Rtech,

Awesome link man!
Didnt know about green fade! (thank god for traffic, otherwise i sure as hell wld have had some of that the day i got my pads replaced!...lol.... actually i was kinda cautious coz i wanted the pads to bed in properly...but had no clue abt this green fade stuff..lol

cya
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