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Old 6th October 2018, 23:03   #901
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re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!

I rather doubt that Royal Enfield would allow the rider to totally disable the ABS.

If someone did and then had a crash because they didn't have a working ABS on their motorcycle some lawyer would be filing a lawsuit against RE.

Either the claim would be the ABS was defective or that RE should have known that by providing a switch that would disable the ABS, owners would be put in danger.

In either case, RE, being a "deep pocket" would lose and be forced to pay millions.

IMO, totally disabling the ABS would be foolish for all but a very few circumstances.

The only time that I can think of where locking up a wheel on a motorcycle is beneficial is sometimes, when doing some serious dirt riding, locking up the rear wheel to make the rear wheel skid sideways can help to change directions rapidly.
Very few riders know how to do this and even fewer will ever need to do this in their lifetime so, my advice is, don't mess with the ABS.

Hey! That's kinda catchy don't you think?

I can envision someone with their leg and arm in a cast, sitting in their wheelchair and on the back of the wheelchair is the sign, "DON'T MESS WITH YOUR ABS".

Last edited by ArizonaJim : 6th October 2018 at 23:07.
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Old 7th October 2018, 15:15   #902
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re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!

Quote:
Originally Posted by ninjatalli View Post
Pulling the plug on all the 3 ABS fuses would disable it; the normal hydraulics would still function I believe
Yes, pulling out the ABS falsifies the ABS controller but the hydraulics would still work as they should, as in you'd have normal braking sans the ABS. But as Arizona Jim mentioned.

Though each to his own, disabling the ABS has its own demerits on the REH. With a puny tire, and braking that is far worse than a CAT and as heavy as a CAT, all it takes is momentum to kill your day, when you least expect.

I for one don't mind switchable ABS, but as long as the ABS works as promised, stopping the wrought iron, when you need to, without nightmares and keeping the rubber side down. Boy! I'm all in.

Cheers!
VJ
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Old 7th October 2018, 21:55   #903
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re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Roy.S View Post
Gentlemen, you are absolutely right! I've just started riding after almost 14 years and found it difficult to settle into a comfortable position on the saddle. ....
Now that I think about it I'd always ride with the balls of my feet on the pegs earlier on my Shogun but tend to rest my heels on the pegs now.
Quote:
Originally Posted by bblost View Post
Unlearning 15+ years of riding my Thunderbird.
...
Try riding in this way. I know it sounds very childish but it works for me.
Gentlemen,
I remember seeing a lot of posts on this thread on how the seat was uncomfortable on long rides. Did the (updated) feet resting position create any change in your recent riding experiences?

P.s. I'm like the moth attracted to the light (=this thread). Can not just sign off the pending decision
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Old 7th October 2018, 22:05   #904
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re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!

Quote:
Originally Posted by ninjatalli View Post
Gentlemen,
I remember seeing a lot of posts on this thread on how the seat was uncomfortable on long rides. Did the (updated) feet resting position create any change in your recent riding experiences?

P.s. I'm like the moth attracted to the light (=this thread). Can not just sign off the pending decision
I will only be able to answer after a decently long ride.

Right now the max I have ridden with this new sitting style is about 30 odd kilometers, nonstop.
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Old 8th October 2018, 11:20   #905
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re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!

The Himalayan BS IV ABS Service Manual is available at this link (It is a scanned copy and clarity is very poor)
http://www.royalenfieldlesite.fr/spi...ice-manual.pdf
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Old 9th October 2018, 00:55   #906
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re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!

Regarding the seat comfort again.

I have done 3-4 300kms rides (one way) with the REHimalayan earlier and have not faced any discomfort. However, my last ride to Pondi which was close to 750kms round trip, I had a bad irritation after sitting for 200+ kms only. Even a quick 300kms roundtrip That I did yesterday from Bangalore to Talakad, I did not have a great experience with the seats. I'm just wondering if it had something to do with the way I'm riding, the clothing (its same riding pant all the rides, more or less same running short and running undergarments is what I use during my long rides), temperature or the changes in seat quality that has caused this! I'll try to understand if over a period of time if the seat becomes softer and if that is leading to such experience! I had major discomfort when completing the Pondi ride, never experienced this earlier. Need to figure out the reason so that I have the right solution.
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Old 9th October 2018, 21:10   #907
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re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!

I can understand that RE doesn't provide the option to disable the ABS because of cost, but on a motorcycle meant to be taken off road, its a massive miss

RE themselves say it, no? "Built for no roads. Built for all roads"!

On the street, I am in 100% agreement with you. Its nonsensical to disable or even want to disable the ABS

Off road, its a vital part of you being able to ride efficiently and safely

Quote:
Originally Posted by ArizonaJim View Post
If someone did and then had a crash because they didn't have a working ABS on their motorcycle some lawyer would be filing a lawsuit against RE
Then how come BMW, KTM and many other manufacturers allow it? They operate with RE in many common markets, and have deep(er?) pockets too

Quote:
Originally Posted by ArizonaJim View Post
IMO, totally disabling the ABS would be foolish for all but a very few circumstances.

The only time that I can think of where locking up a wheel on a motorcycle is beneficial is sometimes, when doing some serious dirt riding, locking up the rear wheel to make the rear wheel skid sideways can help to change directions rapidly
You are correct! Don't know about "serious" riding but just being out on a trail, being able to momentarily lock the rear wheel can be an absolute life safer. And a bike like the Himalayan, which is DYNAMITE off road; must have all the off road tools in its bag of tricks. Being able to slide the rear wheel is one of them

And its not as hard either to be honest. I am not talking drifting multiple feet for that magazine cover shot. I am talking mere inches, just tapping the rear brake enough to point the bike in the right direction instead of the traditional counter-steering method; depending on the surface you ride on

Don't believe me? Well, try to take a corner on your motorcycle using the traditional counter-steer; when riding on clay like mud. If you want to take my word for it, let me tell you - it wont be pretty (Go on, ask me how I know)



Quote:
Originally Posted by ArizonaJim View Post
Hey! That's kinda catchy don't you think?
"I was going fast; tried to stop. A simple button; would've helped my cause"

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Old 10th October 2018, 00:09   #908
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re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Urban_Nomad View Post
I can understand that RE doesn't provide the option to disable the ABS because of cost, but on a motorcycle meant to be taken off road, its a massive miss

RE themselves say it, no? "Built for no roads. Built for all roads"!

On the street, I am in 100% agreement with you. Its nonsensical to disable or even want to disable the ABS

Off road, its a vital part of you being able to ride efficiently and safely



Then how come BMW, KTM and many other manufacturers allow it? They operate with RE in many common markets, and have deep(er?) pockets too



You are correct! Don't know about "serious" riding but just being out on a trail, being able to momentarily lock the rear wheel can be an absolute life safer. And a bike like the Himalayan, which is DYNAMITE off road; must have all the off road tools in its bag of tricks. Being able to slide the rear wheel is one of them
I'd like add my opinion here. Totally agree with you to have a switchable ABS there so that rider has flexibility.
However, its bit too much to consider RE Himalayan an off-roader. It's considered (and advertised) as a good adventure tourer or dual-sport motorcycle but not an off-roader. It's one with some abilities to go off the road but its not the core capabilities, so we should not consider it to be an off-road motorcycle whenever we discuss anything around it, that's just my opinion.
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Old 11th October 2018, 18:34   #909
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re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!

So this happened.
The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!-1.jpg


Step 1 is simple. Remove the disc brakes pipe from the rubber thing.
The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!-2.jpg

Loosen the bolt on the right hand side. The toolkit has the two parts that connect together to form a long enough spanner.
Then pull it out from the other side.
The wheel comes out easily.
The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!-3.jpg

Put all the freed up parts together on the axle. Tuck the disc unit somewhere safe. Put something like a spanner between the disc pads for extra protection.
The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!-4.jpg


The nightmare begins when you try to fix back the wheel.
1. Fix the sprocket back in position. Then carefully bring the wheel in and get the chain around the sprocket. Then sit down. Using both your feet lift up the wheel and align it with the swing arm's hole. Slide in the axle.
Then put the washer in place. Push in the axle a little more. So that its entered about half the washer.
Bring the disc brake unit. Slide it into the correct position.
You will now be on the right hand side. Lift the wheel from the bottom using your foot and somehow manage to push the axle in at the same time.
WEAR OLD CLOTHES.
You may find it easier to remove the adjustment thing from the swing arm when doing this.
Once the axle has crossed the brakes, put the alignment thing and somehow get it in line with the axle.

The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!-5.jpg

My old thunderbird is much simpler than this nonsensical design.
Everything in the Himalayan assembly will keep falling down.

Patience is a virtue. Add your favorite expletive after this.
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Old 17th October 2018, 00:09   #910
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re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!

Quote:
Originally Posted by bblost View Post
So this happened.
Attachment 1806896
ah! going to need some training to do this entire thing. I'm just praying I don't get to face this situation on highways before I get myself trained. I have heard about basic workshop being carried out by RE, shall check with them and would like to attend one.


While planning to next trip to Kodi Bengre from Bangalore, I'm again reminded of the irritating seat experience from my past couple of rides. I don't want to buy those air bubble seats as yet, thinking of using my cycling short under the riding pant that has got the gel, but I'm concerned about how tight it is and would I be able to bear it for 10+ hours! I've used it for cycling as long as for about 6-8 hours so far.

Also, I have got the t-stem issue second time post my Pondicherry and Talakadu trips. I've got the bike washed a couple of times and suspecting it could be the power wash that may have led the water sipping into the t-stem, causing the fork to start talking!
The response I get from RE service center is the usual template, the SC guy asking me to get it fixed at SC every time it comes back. I've been reading that the water logging in the t-stem was old BS3 issue, even BS3 folks have updated to BS4 design that has better T-stem and cap design. Mine is the new design and its still showing the problem every 500-700 kms (is it because power wash done during these times! need to rule that out). The service manager said we'll look into it but at the end of 5K service, they have cleaned and greased the bearings as usual. I don't want to visit the SC every 500-700 kms just to get the bearings greased, I have heard that we can use better quality grease (marine grade) that can go for few thousand kilometers before this issue shows up again.
Has anyone faced this T-stem issue with the BS4? Any working/ proven solution around this so far?
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Old 17th October 2018, 00:22   #911
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re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!

You can get a pair of tire spoons for 300/- and a core remover for 30/-, the rest is commonsense, always change the tube after a puncture, always!

Do let me know if you need pictures of the items.
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Old 29th October 2018, 21:34   #912
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re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!

Quote:
Originally Posted by rakesh_r View Post
Sharing mine, if you dont mind .
Quote:
Originally Posted by bblost View Post
Thanks Guys.

I have almost solved my issue with the seat.[list][*]The lowered angle of the handlebar.
Hi Guys,

doing a multi quote for the first time (and dont think I got it right) so kindly excuse.

Wanted to basically use the pic @rakesh_r had shared showing the raised handlebar. The last pic shared also shows some measurements/gradients on the handlebar that probably allows for different levels of adjustment (?) and bblost's comment above.

Also, rakeshji's post was in reply to bblost's continuing problems with his seat and back/bum ache which if I'm to believe from the post above, has been solved.

So basically a few questions from both of you gentlemen:

1. @rakesh_r : would be great help to understand the process and the how of installing/raising the handlebar and what new parts were used. Does it invlove changing the entire handlebar assembly? basically wanted to understand the level of mods required since have read here earlier about rings/spacers also being used to increase handlebar height.

2. @rakesh-r: does the gradient on the handle also mean/allow to change the lean angle of the handlebar (inwards/outwards w.r.t. the rider) ?

3. @bblost: could you please share what exactly the mods undertaken were (since you mention the angle also here) and how it helped with the overall back problem.

Thank you guys in advance!

I have been waiting patiently to book my Himalayan for over 2 years now and thanks to all the self learning gotten here has allowed me to be calm; from the 1st gen recalls-to bs3-to FI-and now to ABS (finally!)

And yet the bike will never be perfect - and I'm fine with that. These discussions have allowed me to make a comprehensive list of mods/improvements that are already being budgeted for before the bike is even here!

Thanks again!

Last edited by bblost : 29th October 2018 at 21:40. Reason: Fixed a broken tag.
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Old 29th October 2018, 21:42   #913
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re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!

Quote:
3. @bblost: could you please share what exactly the mods undertaken were (since you mention the angle also here) and how it helped with the overall back problem.
I sit with feet correct on the pedals.
The handlebar was loosened and brought down a little.

I might change my seat in the future.

Quote:

I have been waiting patiently to book my Himalayan for over 2 years now and thanks to all the self learning gotten here has allowed me to be calm; from the 1st gen recalls-to bs3-to FI-and now to ABS (finally!)
Life is too short to waste in waiting. Just get the bike. The road is waiting for you.
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Old 30th October 2018, 01:56   #914
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re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ketan View Post
ah! going to need some training to do this entire thing. I'm just praying I don't get to face this situation on highways before I get myself trained. I have heard about basic workshop being carried out by RE, shall check with them and would like to attend one.


While planning to next trip to Kodi Bengre from Bangalore, I'm again reminded of the irritating seat experience from my past couple of rides. I don't want to buy those air bubble seats as yet, thinking of using my cycling short under the riding pant that has got the gel, but I'm concerned about how tight it is and would I be able to bear it for 10+ hours! I've used it for cycling as long as for about 6-8 hours so far.

<SNIP>
The service manager said we'll look into it but at the end of 5K service, they have cleaned and greased the bearings as usual. I don't want to visit the SC every 500-700 kms just to get the bearings greased, I have heard that we can use better quality grease (marine grade) that can go for few thousand kilometers before this issue shows up again.
Has anyone faced this T-stem issue with the BS4? Any working/ proven solution around this so far?
I rode little under 1000kms and have not seen the t-stem bearing talking again, but while going on highways at very high speed, I feel I hear them! need to really figure out if the issue is going to come back, I shall come to know post a few more rides.

Regarding the irritation due to the 'so soft seats' we have on REH, this time, I have used my cycling bib short and it has made all the difference, I could just ride for the entire day. The problem here seems to be the soft nature of the seat which may have issues beyond an hour or two. Surprisingly, I did not see this issue during first 2-4 rides I had with this bike, assuming the seats may have lost the stiffness over a period of time!
As bblost mentioned earlier, using the ball of the foot on the peg helps, it does, by lifting your quads a bit, by not resting it for a long time. However, you may tire your leg by always riding on ball of your feet (unless you have stronger calf muscles to lift that quads + fat out there for long time).
I've not seen that issue, I don't have a lot of adipose tissues around quads and I don't rest my quads too much on the seat, even without the ball of the feet on pegs. However, I had to keep reminding myself about this position and keep adjusting it at certain interval to ensure I'm not resting my quads on the seat since the gel pads are only on the seat-bone area of my cycling bib, quads if rested for a long time on seat, may still create irritation is what I felt.
However, if you guys have a cycling short around, especially the one with the gel pads (the normal one should also help), please give it a try. It'll certainly make a difference. I rode 522 kms to get to Kodi Bengre (via mudigere, kudremukha, Agumbe) and rode 450 kms (via shiradi ghat) while coming back and I didn't have any irritations on my bums for these long stretches. It was really useful. Some pics I can share here..
Attached Thumbnails
The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!-kodibengreoct2018iso-1001180-sec-f-2.0img_20181021_063313.jpg  

The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!-kodibengreoct2018iso-1001320-sec-f-2.0img_20181021_070851.jpg  

The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!-kodibengreoct2018iso-1001500-sec-f-2.0img_20181020_145914.jpg  

The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!-kodibengreoct2018iso-1001900-sec-f-2.0img_20181020_132636.jpg  

The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!-kodibengreoct2018iso-125150-sec-f-2.0img_20181019_173420.jpg  

The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!-kodibengreoct2018iso-12511700-sec-f-2.0img_20181020_111654.jpg  

The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!-kodibengreoct2018iso-250125-sec-f-2.0img_20181019_180440.jpg  

The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!-kodibengreoct2018iso-250125-sec-f-2.0img_20181021_102328.jpg  

The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!-kodibengreoct2018iso-250135-sec-f-2.0img_20181019_171547.jpg  

The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!-kodibengreoct2018iso-250135-sec-f-2.0img_20181021_181929.jpg  

The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!-kodibengreoct2018iso-500120-sec-f-2.0img_20181019_181304.jpg  


Last edited by Ketan : 30th October 2018 at 01:59.
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Old 30th October 2018, 09:21   #915
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re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!

Quote:
Originally Posted by vibhorjuyal View Post

1. @rakesh_r : would be great help to understand the process and the how of installing/raising the handlebar and what new parts were used. Does it invlove changing the entire handlebar assembly? basically wanted to understand the level of mods required since have read here earlier about rings/spacers also being used to increase handlebar height.

2. @rakesh-r: does the gradient on the handle also mean/allow to change the lean angle of the handlebar (inwards/outwards w.r.t. the rider) ?
Answer to your question, I opted for the offroader handle right during the delivery since the stock handle was simply too small for my frame.
The offroader handle is good, no questions asked, but I still found it a bit uncomfortable especially while standing on the footpeg and riding, that's when I decided to go in for the handle bar raisers.
You wont need to go through all this hoopla now since the handlebar from the Thunderbird TBX is a straight fit, I didnt know of this option when I bought the Himalayan in June.
On the lean angle or the position, yes the Handlebar can be rotated either towards or away from the rider.
Hope my answers helped you solve your queries.
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