Team-BHP > Electric Cars


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 13th July 2019, 18:26   #1
Distinguished - BHPian
 
anjan_c2007's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: India
Posts: 6,575
Thanked: 10,010 Times
Default And in the Electric Mobility category, the winners are...Electrical Engineers

The switchover to EV's will happen sooner or later. Maybe its 2030, 2040 or even 2045 ! Electrical engineers will be very much in demand and the faculty of automobile engineering will also have to offer modules with specialisation in electrical automobile engineering. And disruption of the automobile market, the world over except in the oil producing countries is imminent in the next few decades. Newer Tesla like entrants will swarm the markets, unless the present automobile makers do a seamless transition to EV's with their own brands during the next one or two decade/s. The development of infrastructure and other compulsory add-ons that are appended with electric mobility will have to be thought of by policy makers.

The nascent EV industry will shift most of the automotive engineer jobs to electrical engineers, says Prof Ramesh Rayudu from Wellington, New Zealand.

Quote:

The future of electric vehicles (EVs) in the world is bright with clear pathways from both government and industry, says Ramesh Rayudu, senior lecturer, School of Engineering and Computer Science, Victoria University of Wellington. He adds, "Our work has predicted that around 25% of transportation (involving cars, motor bikes, scooters, cars, trucks and autos) in India will be electric by 2030. The intake is less now (about 2000 vehicles) but a lot is being done in two and three-wheeler technologies that would increase the uptake."

The nascent EV industry will shift most of the automotive engineer jobs to electrical engineers, says Rayudu. "What is required are new policies and pricing. Possibly, there could be new EV companies such as Tesla, challenging the traditional car companies. Going by the need for sustainable development, the employability prospects for future graduates in this field are limitless- from EV engineers to policy makers and EV technicians," he says.
https://auto.economictimes.indiatime...neers/70191508

In 2018, the global electric car population exceeded 5.1 million, which is an increase of 2 million from the previous year with new electric car sales almost doubling. China remains the world’s largest electric car market, followed by Europe and the United States. Norway is the global leader in terms of electric car market share.

With the recent initiatives by our policy makers, who have woken up a few years ago and who are though setting up hurried and unrealistic targets with their hare-brained, arbitrary, ill-timed decisions, the switchover in India to electric mobility will surely happen sooner than later. The policy makers need to enumerate a detailed EV policy and set holistic targets that can be achievable. It is certain that by 2035-40 the scenario will be fully tilted in favour of EV's here. Electrical automobile engineers will be the winners.

Last edited by anjan_c2007 : 13th July 2019 at 18:33.
anjan_c2007 is offline   (4) Thanks
Old 13th July 2019, 19:15   #2
Newbie
 
LiCoO2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: New Delhi
Posts: 21
Thanked: 121 Times
Default re: And in the Electric Mobility category, the winners are...Electrical Engineers

As someone who works in EV space, I don't think gives a full picture.
Its power electronics engineers and Mechanical Engineers that will be making a big buck. And power electronics is a mix of electronics and electrical engineering. Most engineers that I see are either electrical or they are electronics but rarely both. So if you are planning to enter this space, prepare to learn both.

Since the amount of electric energy is condensed in such a small space, everything produces tons of heat and that requires Mechanical engineering.

However, no one will beat material scientists, chemists and chemical engineers. The power electronics in EVs aren't anything new. All the bottlenecks in EVs comes down to the limitations of materials used in batteries and motors. Whoever figures this stuff out will be rich beyond anyones dreams.

So if you are a student, start learning material science and electrochemistry!
LiCoO2 is offline   (12) Thanks
Old 15th July 2019, 16:08   #3
Team-BHP Support
 
Samurai's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Bangalore/Udupi
Posts: 24,633
Thanked: 28,167 Times
Default Re: And in the Electric Mobility category, the winners are...Electrical Engineers

Quote:
Originally Posted by anjan_c2007 View Post
Electrical engineers will be very much in demand
Well, that will be interesting...

I was once told by a very senior electrical engineer that 99% of the electrical engineers in India don't understand electricity. They just maintain the equipment, and know how to fix common problems with known solutions. Over the years I have confirmed this with many electrical engineers, yet to meet somebody who has refuted this.

How often do you come across electrical engineers who talk like this? Almost never.

I suspect similar thing will happen in the EV space. You will need probably 0.1% or less engineers who really need to know their stuff. They will be the core designers and testers. Rest will just follow the cook book to assemble and maintain equipment.
Samurai is offline   (3) Thanks
Old 16th July 2019, 07:36   #4
GTO
Team-BHP Support
 
GTO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Bombay
Posts: 61,639
Thanked: 209,983 Times
Default Re: And in the Electric Mobility category, the winners are...Electrical Engineers

Quote:
Originally Posted by Samurai View Post
You will need probably 0.1% or less engineers who really need to know their stuff. They will be the core designers and testers. Rest will just follow the cook book to assemble and maintain equipment.
I think this will be even more the case with EVs where IMHO batteries & motors will become a commodity. Unlike say, how it is today with the huge developments required for combustion engines, especially common-rail diesels and DI turbo-petrols. I don't think the powertrain differentiator will be as much among EVs as they mature.
GTO is offline   (2) Thanks
Old 16th July 2019, 10:34   #5
Senior - BHPian
 
VeluM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Bangalore
Posts: 1,667
Thanked: 1,196 Times
Default Re: And in the Electric Mobility category, the winners are...Electrical Engineers

Quote:
Originally Posted by Samurai View Post
Well, that will be interesting...

I was once told by a very senior electrical engineer that 99% of the electrical engineers in India don't understand electricity. They just maintain the equipment, and know how to fix common problems with known solutions. Over the years I have confirmed this with many electrical engineers, yet to meet somebody who has refuted this.

How often do you come across electrical engineers who talk like this? Almost never.

I suspect similar thing will happen in the EV space. You will need probably 0.1% or less engineers who really need to know their stuff. They will be the core designers and testers. Rest will just follow the cook book to assemble and maintain equipment.
An electrical engineer is taught all that is mentioned in your linked post. It is quite basic to be honest. Electrical engineering also includes basic electronics education, and an electronics-based practical project as well, so it is a good mix in terms of basic knowledge required to understand how the electrical and electronic components that are part of a pure electric vehicle. It depends then on whether the engineer decides to go into research & development or maintenance, as with any of the sciences.

I agree completely that material sciences will be the top of the pyramid in terms of jobs available (few) and value (research and salary). AC or DC electric motors haven't really changed much other than maybe the materials used because they are very efficient, and I don't expect them to require much maintenance anyway.

Car batteries and to a lesser extent the mechanical components will continue to be the main research and development areas, IMHO.
VeluM is offline  
Old 16th July 2019, 11:07   #6
Senior - BHPian
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Mumbai
Posts: 1,217
Thanked: 3,957 Times
Default Re: And in the Electric Mobility category, the winners are...Electrical Engineers

I will be more than happy to repair my car in our garage with an electrician. How convenient will that be.

No need for complex engineering trouble shooting. Imagine the complexity in current cars for mechanisms like engine, clutch, cooling systems, exhaust systems, etc.
2000rpm is offline   (1) Thanks
Old 16th July 2019, 11:07   #7
Team-BHP Support
 
Samurai's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Bangalore/Udupi
Posts: 24,633
Thanked: 28,167 Times
Default Re: And in the Electric Mobility category, the winners are...Electrical Engineers

Quote:
Originally Posted by VeluM View Post
An electrical engineer is taught all that is mentioned in your linked post. It is quite basic to be honest. Electrical engineering also includes basic electronics education, and an electronics-based practical project as well, so it is a good mix in terms of basic knowledge required to understand how the electrical and electronic components that are part of a pure electric vehicle.
I guess you are referring to the syllabus. But whether they are actually taught that syllabus is a matter of opinion.

Material science is fundamental to lots of industries, not just EV space. Yet, we rarely see or meet material science engineers/scientists on a regular basis. I know only one material scientist, and have lost touch with him in the last few years.

For every 1000 engineers who deals with the end products (say EV), we might need one material scientist or even less.
Samurai is offline  
Old 16th July 2019, 12:57   #8
Senior - BHPian
 
VeluM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Bangalore
Posts: 1,667
Thanked: 1,196 Times
Default Re: And in the Electric Mobility category, the winners are...Electrical Engineers

Quote:
Originally Posted by Samurai View Post
I guess you are referring to the syllabus. But whether they are actually taught that syllabus is a matter of opinion.

Material science is fundamental to lots of industries, not just EV space. Yet, we rarely see or meet material science engineers/scientists on a regular basis. I know only one material scientist, and have lost touch with him in the last few years.

For every 1000 engineers who deals with the end products (say EV), we might need one material scientist or even less.
I'm an electrical engineer, and not from a well known or ranking college, but we were taught and tested. Our final semester project was DC motor speed control through pulse width modulation. We had to build the circuit using individual components on a PCB - not complex but just an idea of what level of electronics is taught in electrical engineering. This was nearly two decades ago and things might have changed since.

The quoted post talks about fundamental aspects of AC, not very complex or advanced stuff. That is the basis for load calculations from the house level to large scale distribution. I'm rusty from disuse, but I still remember that much The depth of knowledge will certainly differ based on whether one continued in the field via work or further studies though, that's for sure.

I cannot speak for all engineers, but I think the job opportunities have been more restrictive than knowledge. Most engineers from any field have for a while now ended up trying for software jobs. Hopefully we will see more stream specific employment in the electric automobile industry.
VeluM is offline  
Reply

Most Viewed
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Copyright 2000 - 2021, Team-BHP.com
Proudly powered by E2E Networks