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Old 14th February 2021, 20:24   #1366
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Re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!

Short ride to Horsley hills today. 250kms round trip to & fro.
I was there around 2pm which really doesn't make sense. Sunrise and sunset would be killer here!

The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!-img_20210214_144023.jpg

The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!-img_20210214_143819.jpg

The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!-img_20210214_143836.jpg
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Old 14th February 2021, 22:08   #1367
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Re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!

Quote:
Originally Posted by ManasN95 View Post
No, what I was asking around is, is there a way around the hard clutch?

A longer clutch wire maybe?

It would be a pain in city rides if the clutch is really that hard.

They're getting version launched day before in a couple of days. I'll try test riding again to see if the clutch is really hard.
Changing the length of the clutch wire or cable won't reduce the force needed to disengage the clutch.
It is the amount of leverage that needs to be changed to reduce the force needed.
There are several lengthened clutch levers available on the world wide market but these are rather expensive. There is also a device that can be installed to the clutch cable between the clutch lever and the clutch throwout arm which reduce the force needed to disengage the clutch.
Inside them the clutch cable attaches to a large spool. This spool has a smaller spool attached directly to it. This smaller spool has the cable going to the clutch throwout arm attached to it. Like the longer lever options, these are somewhat expensive.

With both of these designs, the distance the lever needs to move to disengage the clutch increases so the rider basically needs to move his fingers further.

Rather than spending the extra money, I suggest just getting used to the increased force needed to disengage the clutch.
After riding a few weeks of riding, the riders arm will strengthen and the additional power needed to operate the clutch won't be noticed.

Last edited by ArizonaJim : 14th February 2021 at 22:09.
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Old 14th February 2021, 22:21   #1368
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Re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!

Quote:
Originally Posted by ArizonaJim View Post
There is also a device that can be installed to the clutch cable between the clutch lever and the clutch throwout arm which reduce the force needed to disengage the clutch.
Inside them the clutch cable attaches to a large spool. This spool has a smaller spool attached directly to it. This smaller spool has the cable going to the clutch throwout arm attached to it. Like the longer lever options, these are somewhat expensive.
I have seen a demo of this http://www.a2z-motorcycle-superstore...-version-black

It was very soft to use. No idea on long term usability.
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Old 15th February 2021, 02:01   #1369
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Re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!

Quote:
Originally Posted by ManasN95 View Post
No, what I was asking around is, is there a way around the hard clutch?
Just quoting an old post of mine.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ashwinprakas View Post
If anyone's on the lookout for a cheaper remedy for whatever reason you have two options;

1. Get rid of the return spring on the Clutch Arm, on some motorcycles it's on the outside and on some it's on the inside. Irrespective of that it would take a couple of minutes to remove. This isn't an essential component strictly speaking, it is just there to make the motorcycle idiot proof as it negates the possibility of setting the clutch slack wrong.

2. Extend the Clutch Arm and Bend the holder to align. You could simply get a spare clutch arm and then get it extended, once installed just bend the cable holder such that the inner isn't fouling with the cable outer. I've noticed that the design on some of the Jap's are plain lazy compared to the one on my P220(Rod and Arm are separate parts), so practically you'd be reinforcing a component.

The first one is free and the second one would cost you peanuts.

Sharing for information's sake. I've personally gone with the first option as it was effortless and took under a minute on my motorcycle as the rod and arm are separate.

Hope that helps.
A.P.
Heres a comparison picture of what the Second Option would look like, for ease of understanding;

Name:  images 32.jpeg
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Size:  18.8 KB

These are just universal means to get about lightening the clutch.

Regards,
A.P.
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Old 15th February 2021, 09:38   #1370
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Re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!

Quote:
Originally Posted by ManasN95 View Post
I rode a Himalayan for the first time, and maybe it is the Honda clutch that has spoilt me, but goodness me the clutch was super hard to operate.
Is the clutch hard, yes. I replaced the stock cable with the one from Pro Spec as shared by Bhpian bblost, very effective.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bblost View Post
I have seen a demo of this http://www.a2z-motorcycle-superstore...-version-black
It was very soft to use. No idea on long term usability.
Using since 2018 November, no issues till now (Touch Wood).
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Old 15th February 2021, 10:28   #1371
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Re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!

Quote:
Originally Posted by ManasN95 View Post
So, I was coming back from Pune to home (Dombivli) yesterday and had stuck in the horrendous Shilphata traffic, where in the motorcyclists had to proceed from the left of the traffic, on broken roads. I was on my CBR and boy my shoulders were busted by the time I was home.

Has anyone come around with a solution for this?
Look at the bright side, you don't need to pay for the Gym equipment to develop those biceps or triceps or what ever muscles the hard clutch works up.

As members have already pointed out, longer cables don't really lower the effort. Only a longer clutch lever might help as the fulcrum principle would help reduce the effort.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ashwinprakas View Post
Just quoting an old post of mine.

1. Get rid of the return spring on the Clutch Arm, on some motorcycles it's on the outside and on some it's on the inside. Irrespective of that it would take a couple of minutes to remove. This isn't an essential component strictly speaking, it is just there to make the motorcycle idiot proof as it negates the possibility of setting the clutch slack wrong.
I doubt if that would help. Maybe its model specific and not a cure for all remedy. I would not be comfortable with the idea of letting the clutch springs take care of the return action.

Last edited by srini1785 : 15th February 2021 at 10:48.
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Old 15th February 2021, 13:37   #1372
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Re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!

Quote:
Originally Posted by srini1785 View Post
Look at the bright side, you don't need to pay for the Gym equipment to develop those biceps or triceps or what ever muscles the hard clutch works up.
In my case I had no choice since I have had a wrist Injury couple of years back. The pain resurfaced when I rode the Himalayan in heavy Mumbai traffic to an extent where i literally felt like chopping of my wrist.
Pro-Spec is god sent. I have ridden the Himalayan in the worst traffic and my wrist is super happy.
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Old 15th February 2021, 17:02   #1373
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Re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!

Quote:
Originally Posted by srini1785 View Post
Since it happens only in motion, i would check the chain and all associated moving parts like the spigot, sprockets, bearing etc.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ArizonaJim View Post
It is also possible the noise is coming from the primary drive that connects the engine to the clutch and transmission. I think this is a chain drive like my RE 500. If this is true and the chain tensioner is not keeping the chain tight, it can oscillate creating vibrating noises.
Thank You !

I am making a list of things to check with the mechanics at the service station. I remember the service centre telling me that the chain etc is Ok and just because I am comparing between two bikes, I feel like there is a issue

At one workshop, they checked the clutch etc but didn't find any issue, tightened the tappets and gave it back (took 3 days to do that, but that's another story) and then at the workshop which is known, they said the tappets were too loose and tightened them a bit and also adjusted clutch play.

Both workshops, though, have suggested the same thing - don't worry and ride on as anyways the bike is in warranty. My only worry is that it should not be causing some damage inside.

Thank you once again for the feedback.
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Old 22nd February 2021, 08:39   #1374
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Re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!

The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!-b1.jpg

The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!-b2.jpg

The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!-b3.jpg

Took the bike on a 100+ ride on a two lane road. Enjoyed the fresh air.

The issue of the battery light staying on and tachometer not working came back. But this time I found a very interesting thing. Pressing down the console immediately solves this issue with both of these working.

But when I let go they both stop working. This is definitely a lose connection in the console. I checked the harness connection behind the unit by removing the visor. That is fixed securely.
Maybe I should remove the harness and check for rusting?
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Old 23rd February 2021, 11:35   #1375
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Re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!

Continuing my trend of bad photography here

Quick jaunt to Coorg and back over the weekend. Got to experience the coffee season.
Also, 30k kms done! If the bike stays with me longer, the next 20k would determine how solid it really is. So far so good!

Farms right behind the house:
The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!-img_20210219_171310.jpg

Coffee beans sunbathing:
The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!-img_20210219_171721_1.jpg

Hazy view of Virajpet:
The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!-img_20210219_185046.jpg

Hanging flowers:
The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!-img_20210220_110741.jpg

Glen Lorna tea estate:
The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!-img_20210220_130946.jpg

Not so busy streets of Virajpet:
The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!-img_20210220_181921.jpg

Machines that remind us of basic times:
The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!-img_20210220_221123.jpg
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Old 25th February 2021, 10:43   #1376
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Re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!

Hi folks. I was considering a Power Rage exhaust for my Himalayan. As I am based in
NCR, is it really worth it considering the number of cops out these days and the witch hunt against aftermarket exhausts?

I was wondering how much louder than stock the powerrage is with the db killer on. I noted one of the Amazon reviews of this product which said that it doesn't attract cop attention. Would appreciate if people who have these exhausts could help out.

Cheers
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Old 23rd March 2021, 13:52   #1377
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Re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!

Hey Guys

My question is, should I service my bike as soon as 6 months are done, or wait for the 5k interval to complete, if that might take 1 or 2 extra months.

Also when I'm rotating the rear wheel when it's in free motion, I have a feeling that the break pads might be touching it. It makes a slight scratching sound. I've had this suspicion since the last service. Is it possible that something like this can occur?

Thanks
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Old 23rd March 2021, 14:49   #1378
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Re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!

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Originally Posted by lancia_fanboy View Post
Hey Guys

My question is, should I service my bike as soon as 6 months are done, or wait for the 5k interval to complete, if that might take 1 or 2 extra months.

The rule is "Whichever is Earlier".

Quote:

Also when I'm rotating the rear wheel when it's in free motion, I have a feeling that the break pads might be touching it. It makes a slight scratching sound. I've had this suspicion since the last service. Is it possible that something like this can occur?

Thanks
They are self adjusting, so this should ideally not happen. Ask the service guys to inspect when you give it for service.
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Old 7th April 2021, 14:08   #1379
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Re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!

Hey Guys

So this was to be my 18 month service, and as fork oil change was mentioned in the manual, I got it changed. Now I haven't ever been witness to the process before, but the guy used a pipe to siphon petrol out of my tank to clean the front forks and the springs.
As I didn't know if that's the normal process or not, I stayed quiet back then, but they did use a substantial amount of petrol (~1/1.5 liters).

Now my questions are
1. Should they have used the petrol, as in is this a normal process, or were they saving the agencies money?
2. Should I have gotten my fork cleaned this early on, the bike has been with me for 18 months, but it has run only 8k Kms

Thanks in advance
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Old 7th April 2021, 17:11   #1380
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Re: The Royal Enfield Himalayan thread!

Quote:
Originally Posted by lancia_fanboy View Post

Now my questions are
1. Should they have used the petrol, as in is this a normal process, or were they saving the agencies money?
Most places use petrol to get rid of all the oil deposit and grime, so that's fine.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lancia_fanboy View Post
2. Should I have gotten my fork cleaned this early on, the bike has been with me for 18 months, but it has run only 8k Kms
IIRC, the manual suggests fork oil change after every 10k Kms, so I think even 8k is fine, no harm.
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