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Old 29th January 2024, 12:17   #16
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Re: TVS Apache RTR 310 BTO Review – A Closer Look

Nice review Neil! I've fallen head over heels for this bike mainly due to the way it looks, and the 2 lower variants (base or base + QS) are high on my list. One note about the flyscreen though- TVS has mentioned on their website that the following items are available as accessories, although it must be said that adding anything onto this stunning bike would take away from its aesthetic appeal. Add only if you're a hardcore tourer

TVS Apache RTR 310 BTO Review – A Closer Look-screenshot-20240129-12.13.35-pm.png

Edit: Despite the image of the heavily-kitted bike on their site, the actual accessories page has a bunch of tshirts.

Last edited by Sudarshan42 : 29th January 2024 at 12:21.
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Old 29th January 2024, 15:54   #17
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Re: Final Thoughts On The TVS Apache RTR 310 BTO

Quote:
Originally Posted by neil.jericho View Post
What I can say with utmost certainty, is that I loved every minute that I spent with this TVS Apache RTR 310 BTO motorcycle.
Fantastic review Neil! Loved reading about your time with this bike. What you have said above is what really matters the most, more than specifications or numbers on paper. Would love to experience one myself after reading your glowing report

I also love the way this baby looks except I don’t like the exhaust. For me it doesn’t go with the overall looks of the bike. If the exhaust could have been slimmer it would complete the look in my opinion. Left angled valve stems can easily be added, left I feel is better for our roads.

Look forward to reading your views if/when you manage to get your hands on the 2024 Duke 390.

Cheers
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Old 29th January 2024, 17:40   #18
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Re: TVS Apache RTR 310 BTO Review – A Closer Look

This review is so good and probably much awaited for a long time. Thanks much Niel.

Makes my belief stronger that TVS can engineer great bikes and they have thought through really well on how to diffrentiate RTR310 from the BMW / TVS siblings.

Based on what Niel has outlined, the RTR310 is such an underdog. It deserves more visibility, more sales!

If nothing else, the other manufacturers should atleast pick up how to provide LED illumination that truly works!

Last edited by Nilesh5417 : 29th January 2024 at 17:41.
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Old 30th January 2024, 02:00   #19
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Re: TVS Apache RTR 310 BTO Review – A Closer Look

Thank you for an excellent review Neil! This is probably the closest official review one can get for the RTR 310. I'm one of few who had the pleasure of riding this mean machine when it was launched earlier last year. I'm seriously considering this, though haven't finalized anything.

As you mentioned, this is THE upgrade to a RTR 200 owner like myself.
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Old 30th January 2024, 04:40   #20
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Re: TVS Apache RTR 310 BTO Review – A Closer Look

I follow the Indian car and motorcycle market even though I have been living abroad for close to 7 years now. Thanks largely due to the intel from this Website and Forum. Now, even with all that information, I never knew this model existed, in this BTO form. The RTR series is known to almost every motorcycle enthusiast, however, the model rarely comes up as a recommendation. TVS have never really put in enough effort to sell their performance motorcycles. There have been gaps in product offering and consistency in quality over the years. You can say the same existed with the competition (Example KTM) but that never stopped people from buying or recommending one. This mars the success of a product.

For what is essentially a flagship product, the fact that you can order this in the form of a BTO isn't even mentioned on the front page of their website (Its there for the RR310). Thats an oversight from TVS.

KTM roared in with their Duke 200, followed that up with the Duke 390 (Which I did own for a short window) and those bikes continue as top recommendations if you want something fast and nimble. Bajaj did the same with their Pulsar line. Kept pushing and updating their model portfolio with every opportunity. TVS had to wait till BMW entered the picture to offer something even remotely close to what a Duke 200 could do. The RTR 160/200 hardly worried KTM or Bajaj.

Even with this highly detailed review of the excellent RTR 310 BTO, I would still consider the 390 cause I owned one. Its built up a fan following and a sort of pedigree (TVS has this, to a far lesser degree, even with all that racing DNA). Its going to take something to consider another offering. TVS as a brand is a hard sell for me. Sort of like how Google has been inconsistent with their Pixel devices.

TVS need to go all out in pushing this model. Its such a desirable machine. To the point that you could just admire it while its standing. Such amazing attention to detail that no other motorcycle has in this segment.

Thanks for the detailed write up.
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Old 30th January 2024, 17:10   #21
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Re: TVS Apache RTR 310 BTO Review – A Closer Look

I've ridden a few different RTR200s but could never bring myself to like the bike. Despite being peppy, refined, sounding quite interesting for a bike of its class, it felt too pedestrian. Even Hondas are more fun somehow. While the 310s might have great build quality, I find all the paint jobs on both the RR and RTR to be the bad kind of flashy (and I really like all KTMs in orange and white). Compare it to the white colour BMW G310RR and you will see what I mean.

Quote:
Originally Posted by neil.jericho View Post
So, Dynamic Kit or Dynamic Pro kit? As I mentioned in my initial impressions (TVS Apache RTR 310 launched at Rs. 2.43 lakh) of the Apache RTR 310, I had so many enthusiasts come up to me and talk about the motorcycle, that it boggled my mind. One of most common questions which I got was - If we could only afford one, should we take the Dynamic Kit or the Dynamic Pro kit? To every single person who asked me this, I recommended the Dynamic Pro kit because the huge electronics suite will probably be called into action very rarely, but when you need it, you will be glad that it had your back. For those on a tight budget, I would suggest that you skip the Dynamic kit but if you are an experienced rider, the Dynamic kit along with the Dynamic Pro kit is an absolute no-brainer. If I were to pick an RTR 310 for myself, I would get myself the Sepang Blue (for more Instagram likes, assuming that some day I will actually create an Instagram profile) with both the Dynamic and Dynamic Pro kit.
Have to disagree. The suspension kit is better than an electronics suite anyday because a better suspension with better damping qualities can just as easily save you from a crash coming from unsettling the bike, whether it is due to poor downshift technique, mid corner potholes, poor bodyweight transfer. It allows you to emergency brake safely in the middle of a corner on our unpredictable roads, I don't think electronics do anything more than prevent slides on sandy terrain. And on normal, good days, the suspension allows you to push more whereas the electronics cannot give you an extra 3kmph on a corner, nor does it soften the blow to your spine over a pothole.

The triumphs are cheaper and Bajaj seems committed to the brand. No track junkie is going to buy a slower bike, so aftermarket support for the 310s is always going to be limited compared to the 390 (just look at the 390 restoration threads here, how knowledgeable so many people are about these bikes). The KTMs are the embodiment of 'I came, I saw, I conquered' in the Indian market, meanwhile the RTR310 (apart from being underpowered for the A2 class) has an unfocused design, like you said, MT headlights, ducati radiators, as though the bike itself is not sure what it wants to be. So nope, I think the bike is a tough sell overall even if TVS manages to get their dealerships and service sorted.
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Old 2nd February 2024, 20:17   #22
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Re: TVS Apache RTR 310 BTO Review – A Closer Look

Thank you to everyone who has replied on this thread and otherwise, for all your kind words of appreciation! I never imagined that this thread would evoke such a warm response from so many motorcycle enthusiasts.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Elegant View Post
Sir, this was no less than an official review. Thank you for sharing.
Elegant, I wish that I could reach the fantastic attention to detail levels in the official motorcycle reviews by Dr CD, Axe77 and the others, but thank you!

Quote:
Originally Posted by saikishor View Post
Sir, I had read your BTO RR310 with a lot of enthusiasm when you posted it. Noq, I read this review with the same enthusiasm I had before!
I found it surprising that youth you spoke to found the yellow to be disgusting. I might belong to the same age bracket and I find the yellow to look smashing. Infact given a chance to own this motorcycle, yellow would be the color for me.

TVS isn't selling this motorcycle unless they step up their dealership and marketing game. There are absolutely no test rides available in my city, atleast in the few dealerships that I spoke to.
saikishor, thank you for your kind words. I was genuinely surprised by the feedback from young enthusiasts on the colour schemes. These gentlemen were in their mid 20s, and knew all about the TVS Apache RTR 310 BTO. So, I would say that they are a fair representation of a segment of the target market for this motorcycle. I expected them to admit that they loved the yellow scheme but it was just the opposite! Thus far, I have only seen 1 yellow RTR 310 and about 3 - 5 black ones. I am yet to spot a Sepang Blue RTR 310 and I doubt very much that it will change, even in a motorcycle hungry market like Bangalore.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AtheK View Post
amazing write up neil, this is one bike I am not seeing much of on the road, which is disappointing. Neil how are the vibrations controlled on this bike on highway, I remember with 310RR after constant riding of 1 hour at cruising speeds I used to have numbness in my hand. Is it the same with this bike?

Also what is your view on doing a two up riding on highway with this bike, how comfortable is Pillion seat, would wifey be OK to sit on it for a 100 Km non stop stint. I am very seriously considering to sell my Interceptor and replace it with another bike, while one option is to fill it with RTR310/ADV390 and RS457 (For track and solo fun runs on highway) or seriosuly look at Honda NX500, which can be one bike to do it all.If I get NX500 then S1000RR will start seeing track earlier then I want to take it to track. One other option can be RTR310/ADV390 and S1KRR, I want to avoid RE now, though some part of me really wants me to throw Himalayan in the mix.
Thank you AtheK! The bike that I rode didnt have too many kilometers on the odometer. Im not sure if that had something to do with it, but it was actually much smoother than I expected. After a quick breakfast blast, I had a very mild tingle in my fingers which disappeared quickly but that sensation would have been amplified if I was on a KTM 390, for example.

For your use case, I would seriously suggest the Honda NX500. Ive ridden the CB500X and honestly, I think it is the practical big bike that many Indian enthusiasts need. Its unfortunate that it isnt the motorcycle that they want.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hagaru View Post
Thank you so much for this detailed write-up @neil.jericho! I think this is going to act as a perfect starter guide for those considering this motorcycle.

Considering the location of some of these shots (which is close to a very well known motorbike garage), I'm fairly certain I spotted you on the road, multiple times. As an ex-RTR 200 (very recently sold) owner, the 310 has been on my radar for a long time. As you said, it would be a great upgrade and everytime I've seen it on the road, its massive road presence has always had me staring at the bike. Would've loved to talk to you about the bike but it was crowded and I had taken the car.
Hagaru, thank you for your kind words. It looks like you did indeed spot me riding (hooning? shhh lets not tell anyone) on the Apache RTR 310 BTO. If we do cross paths again, do stop by to chat!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sudarshan42 View Post
Nice review Neil! I've fallen head over heels for this bike mainly due to the way it looks, and the 2 lower variants (base or base + QS) are high on my list. One note about the flyscreen though- TVS has mentioned on their website that the following items are available as accessories, although it must be said that adding anything onto this stunning bike would take away from its aesthetic appeal. Add only if you're a hardcore tourer
Thank you, Sudarshan42! Somehow, I have never gotten comfortable with using a quickshifter on any motorcycle which I ride, as I find it to be totally counter-intuitive. The Triumph Street Triple 675 which I owned, had one and I used it not more than a dozen times. Call me old fashioned. I say all this to say that the base variant of the Apache RTR 310 is actually pretty good value.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyborg View Post
Fantastic review Neil! Loved reading about your time with this bike. What you have said above is what really matters the most, more than specifications or numbers on paper. Would love to experience one myself after reading your glowing report

I also love the way this baby looks except I don’t like the exhaust. For me it doesn’t go with the overall looks of the bike. If the exhaust could have been slimmer it would complete the look in my opinion. Left angled valve stems can easily be added, left I feel is better for our roads.
Cyborg, thank you as always for your kind words. Even today, I find myself surprised by how much fun I had on the motorcycle and how rarely that happens, even with the unimaginable number of motorcycles available to enthusiasts in 2024. I would love to spend a few quality days with a new generation KTM Duke 390 and ride it in different conditions.

I hope someone at KTM is reading this. You know where to find me!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nilesh5417 View Post
This review is so good and probably much awaited for a long time. Thanks much Niel.

Makes my belief stronger that TVS can engineer great bikes and they have thought through really well on how to diffrentiate RTR310 from the BMW / TVS siblings.

Based on what Niel has outlined, the RTR310 is such an underdog. It deserves more visibility, more sales!

If nothing else, the other manufacturers should atleast pick up how to provide LED illumination that truly works!
Nilesh5417, I couldnt agree more with every statement that you made.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nstark13 View Post
Thank you for an excellent review Neil! This is probably the closest official review one can get for the RTR 310. I'm one of few who had the pleasure of riding this mean machine when it was launched earlier last year. I'm seriously considering this, though haven't finalized anything.

As you mentioned, this is THE upgrade to a RTR 200 owner like myself.
nstark13, thank you! All the best for your motorcycle upgrade and do keep us posted on what you finally decide on buying.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sandeepmohan View Post
Even with this highly detailed review of the excellent RTR 310 BTO, I would still consider the 390 cause I owned one. Its built up a fan following and a sort of pedigree (TVS has this, to a far lesser degree, even with all that racing DNA). Its going to take something to consider another offering. TVS as a brand is a hard sell for me. Sort of like how Google has been inconsistent with their Pixel devices.

TVS need to go all out in pushing this model. Its such a desirable machine. To the point that you could just admire it while its standing. Such amazing attention to detail that no other motorcycle has in this segment.

Thanks for the detailed write up.
Thank you sandeepmohan. I genuinely do get why most enthusiasts would opt for the 390s, even if these KTMs havent historically been my favourites. Meanwhile, I hear that TVS is working towards improving the showroom experience and hopefully they can push what is a true underdog in the enthusiast market. At the end of the day, it is us motorcycle riders who benefit from the launch of these well engineered motorcycles.
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Old 16th February 2024, 17:05   #23
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Re: TVS Apache RTR 310 BTO Review – A Closer Look

This thread has been read multiple times over by me and after a few test rides i booked an arsenal black with Quick shifter. Thank you for sharing such detailed analysis which helped immensely. I am looking forward to its delivery once i get the loan related articles sorted. Hopefully it will arrive by the month end. Am i missing out by not getting the Dynamic Kit ?
I am by no means an experienced rider, just someone who is more happy in 4 wheels than 2 ( animal farm anyone?). TPMS and Brass chains are non issue for me, as i will be riding solo, i found the suspension setup adequate.

For the past few months i was mentally preparing myself for getting the Himalayan. Somehow a trip to book a Jupiter (unrelated to my hunt) led me to this. I went in blind the first time and for the 2nd test ride i had gone thru this article a few times over. So thank you very much.

I look forward to getting used to the bike and maybe someday be brave enough to write a well written article like this.
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Old 7th March 2024, 22:32   #24
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Re: TVS Apache RTR 310 BTO Review – A Closer Look

Got the beauty delivered earlier in the month drove it for about 100 km now and loving every bit of it. Long term review is still a W.I.P. However i encountered a " Engine Malfunction"/"check engine light" error. I thought this was restricted to RR310 but see this happening here. I want to chalk it off to the side stand sensor, but will ride again tomorrow to see if error clears, and talk to the service center. Its a shame, otherwise a very good bike
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Old 9th March 2024, 09:19   #25
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Re: TVS Apache RTR 310 BTO Review – A Closer Look

Quote:
Originally Posted by doomketu View Post
I want to chalk it off to the side stand sensor, but will ride again tomorrow to see if error clears, and talk to the service center. Its a shame, otherwise a very good bike
Good News is that after a 25 km ride last night, the error didn't pop up. It was a side stand sensor issue which auto resolved. Told the guy who cleans our vehicle to not touch the bike for a while as i will take care of it myself.
Was low-key worried, if even the coolant fan might be a potential cause. Happy to say it is working normally. It kicked in bumper to bumper traffic and kept running till i hit 50kph . The coolant temps ranged between 75-85 which i feel is normal.

As Captain haddock said : All is well that ends well.
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Old 6th April 2024, 18:01   #26
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Re: TVS Apache RTR 310 BTO Review – A Closer Look

Appucha - My 2024 RTR 310.

A story of how I got back to riding bikes after a 7 year hiatus.

As with majority of families, bikes were considered death incarnate in my home. I was urged by parents from the get to to save up for a car, one that has all bells and whistles, rather than buying a 2-wheeler. Oh how the tables turned when they themselves were invested in my hunt for a 2 wheeler 20 years later. (Hi mum n dad from early 2000's).

As with kids of my generation, we learnt to ride 2 wheeler on our neighbor's Kinetic Honda and my uncles TVS 50. My older cousin would pedal the TVS50 and would let me handle the throttle and turning (albeit in a controlled manner). A geared two wheeler was out of the equation for most of my childhood and adult life due to the taboo associated with it and it was reinforced when dad’s colleague lost their son to an accident.

Being a Mumbaikar, the abundance of train, buses and autos helped moved the population in a cheap efficient manner. I would commute 30 km one way to college via all 3 modes of transport, each feeding the next. Friends who came to college in their brand new Karizma were looked at with awe.

I finally learnt how to ride a Bike at the young age of 27 thanks to an old school friend (thanks Viv), whom I call guruji to this day. He patiently let me take his Pulsar 150 out for a spin and saw me fail miserably with the clutch controls. He would then sit on the pillion and guide me step by step through the open and empty roads of Powai, where we worked at the time. After a few days of practice I could at least ride it in those interior roads.

Later I got a chance to ride a colleague’s bullet regularly back from office, as we lived nearby and was smitten by it. Alas that was not meant to last. While overseas for work, I broke my right hand badly and had to get surgery done. Unfortunately it was shoddily done and I had to return to India and get it done again. This shattered all the hopes I had of riding again (along with most of my right arm), as my hand was in a cast for the better part of a year.

I restricted my self to riding scooty and something in the same weight range for short trips as I could feel the stress on the hand. I did try to ride the bullet again but it was a bit cumbersome.

Late last year the bug to ride bit again wherein I wanted a proper 2 wheeler and the 2023 bullet had caught my eye with Himalayan as a potential backup. Long story short, it didnt work out and I went back into hibernation till TVS launched the RTR 310 and some time passed.

While on a hunt to replace the scooty with a Jupiter, I got a chance to test ride one and was floored. No bike felt so approachable yet so raw. My mind was made after 2 more test rides the same week. I took the inputs written on this thread, massive thanks to Neil , and also saw Strell (a youtuber) had uploaded on the same week. It provided me with an extensive list of what to expect and what to watch out for.

The Sales associate was patient but the guy in charge of the test rides was an absolute treasure trove of information (Vaishnav, you are a champ!!!). I got the finances in order and got the base Arsenal Black with Quick-shifter. Did not opt for any packages.

Booking experience: To the point and no extras added.

Pre Delivery inspection: Went to the yard with my SA and inspected the bike. It was a brand new specimen that was in fact manufactured and cleared just 10 days back. No issues with the bike.

Delivery experience: Stellar. I opted for a fuss free 9 am delivery. Bike was ready to go 2 days after PDI. I got the usual kits and a fantastic helmet. Got a key chain, pin and a mug with TVS branding as a gift inside a TVS branded bag.

The above bits are just ramblings of a man, who just wanted to ride his bike and share it to the forum. Coming to the matter at hand, as someone who is not by any means an experienced rider how does this bike fair? Lets break it down point by point before I get side tracked

1. Weight: At 169 kg (add another 10 for wet weight) its very easy to manage. The pillion grab rails are sturdy and quite grippy.

2. Engine and Power Delivery: It is super friendly, just twist it slowly. It has a tendency to race a lot if you give slightly more throttle in Urban or rain modes, making it buck ahead. The 312CC 27 hp (in urban and rain modes. 35.6 in other 3 modes) under you is not wild. Sub 2.5 k feels a bit lethargic but the next point talks about a solution for that. Top end is fine and I can quickly climb from 30kph 3rd gear to 80 kph 6th gear with just a flick of a wrist and 4 seconds. The engine sounds rough, but let me assure you, its smooth. Shift within the rev band and watch the magic happen.

3. GTT: What TVS calls GTT is basically creep mode. Let go of the clutch slightly and much like the AMT vehicles, the bike will creep ahead and then slowly gain speed. I have tested this till 3rd gear 25 kph, after which its better that you start giving input. This is a godsend in Bangalore traffic.

4. Braking: Rear brakes lack bite, they do the job well but yo may want to taper expectations. Front brakes are nippy, user them with caution.

5. Suspension: Tuned to a slightly stiff setup, i am loving the crisp ride quality. It handles the undulations well and I am able to go through the poor excuse of roads with relatively little discomfort. But make no mistake, take it slowly and done charge over potholes like one would in a Xpulse or Himalayan. I don't get adjustable suspensions as I opted for the base package.

6. Quick-shifter: Truly a marvelous addition that makes the bike that much approachable for newer riders. As its bi-directional, with Slip and assist clutch, up shift and downshift when in motion are *chef’s kiss* butter smooth. Please use these preferable over 4.5k RPM as shifting in lower RPM is better done manually.

7. Tyre: Grippy and does its job well. Tubeless, meaning no worries in case of a flat.

8. Handling: Its perfect for the urban jungle. Handles well and has a shorter turning radius. It can zip between traffic and filter thru quite easily. Its truly a bike for urban setting.

9. Economy: I do a bit of spirited driving if the roads permit it but I usually prefer to stick to sub 55kph. The tank to tank showed 28 for the latest refill. This was for the office commutes where I spend 10 -15 minutes praying to the gods of Tin factory and Beniganahalli Lake to give me quick and safe passage. For the refill before that it showed 33 as I had ridden it in the night on open roads quite sedately. Not much to complain here. I am sure it will improve after the first service.

10. Cruise Control: For folks who do highway riding, this is a boon. I used it once and loved it, but setting it can be a bit intimidating. Maybe with practice, will get easier.

11. Seat: For someone who is +6ft , seat is comfortable. The front of the Pillion has a cushion exactly where my lower back rests, thus cradling the lumbar area with a much needed support. Pillion Seat is NOT FRIENDLY. I got it for the sole purpose of solo riding, so for me this is a non issue.

12. Headlights: DRL is a sleek strip at the lower end of the headlight. Dynamic headlight setting is ON by default, in case its dark, lights immediately switch on . The sensors take care of it completely. High beam is super bright and has a good throw.

13. Vibration: Yup its a vibey single. Is it a free prostrate examination? No. Is it like a wall drilling that is happening 5 floors away? Sure. At lower end the foot pegs have a slight buzz. The fuel tank and the handlebar too buzz at speeds up to 80. I have not crossed 80, so I cannot see firsthand how it behaves at higher speeds where the vibrations minimize drastically (apparently).

All of the points mentioned above, especially the GTT, Quick-shifter and the rather linear initial power delivery make it a super friendly bike. I can slowly creep to a start when the signal turns green and within 5 seconds hit 40kph on 3rd and then quick shift my way to escape the rash driving Tempo traveler anna who is honking so that you can make way for his dumb ass, despite the fact that you both will stop at the same signal down the road.

To any other new rider who wants a decent bike loaded to the eyes with features that can make your commute fun, you can consider this bike.

Note: this is the first time I am writing something so verbose as I prefer to lurk around . For more expert opinions Neil.Jericho has already spent time and effort explaining all that this mini monster can do.

Thank you.
Attached Thumbnails
TVS Apache RTR 310 BTO Review – A Closer Look-appucha.jpg  


Last edited by Axe77 : 6th April 2024 at 21:11. Reason: LOVED the post but needed heavy editing for typos, spacing, caps etc. Please do proofread before submitting. Thank you. :-)
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Old 6th April 2024, 20:17   #27
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Re: TVS Apache RTR 310 BTO Review – A Closer Look

@doomketu
Great write up and review. I also like your username
I’m also looking to buy this exact configuration, this is the mid variant I believe. Please do add a few more pics if you can. Good luck and happy riding!
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Old 7th April 2024, 12:41   #28
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Re: TVS Apache RTR 310 BTO Review – A Closer Look

Hey there Pythonic. Thank you thank you. This is indeed the mid variant in terms of overall variants but the base for the Quick-shifter model. I will add more pictures after i complete the first service and can expand my travel radius.
If you are considering this, please do extensive test rides where you travel at least 10km total. You will be able to extract so much information from that.
Good luck and if you do end up with the same model, please do post your thoughts here. Cheers
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Old 8th April 2024, 14:15   #29
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Re: TVS Apache RTR 310 BTO Review – A Closer Look

Congrats doomketu. Enjoy your bike. For a bike that is so good looking they should have had a newer more refined engine. Not sure if they have any plans to upgrade the engine at all for this and its RR version.
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Old 9th June 2024, 12:38   #30
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Re: TVS Apache RTR 310 BTO Review – A Closer Look

Updates after First service & TVS Care Craft Camp :

First Service :

I am a lazy individual, so i apologize for the delay in posting updates here. I got the first service done at Bharath TVS jayanagar ,Bangalore. It set me back by 1100Rs. This was done on April 10th . During the Service i mentioned the brake bite issue and the clutch stiffness. They adjusted it promptly and told me to take a test ride. The changes have now made the clutch easier to operate. They mentioned the adjustment was done to the cable and now the feedback is properly sent. My next service is due in august.



TVS Care Craft Camp :


I got a call from TVS motors last week , asking if i would be interested in attending a Care camp at their Institute of Quality and Leadership, Anekal. I happily agreed as this would be a new experience. The agenda was to invite the owners of the current flagship and teach them about the bike, explain the effort that went into designing it and having a hands on DIY session for fixes that could be done by the rider.

The journey to the camp :

Their TVS IQL center is also their R&D center that is located in Anekal. Its near the Karnataka Tamil Nadu border , located just 20 km south of electronic city , and about 50km from my location . Only the last 8km is worth mentioning as it is flanked by fields on both sides and looks beautiful. The majority of the section is the usual Bangalore Hosur road that is swamped with traffic anytime of the day. Upon entering their beautiful premise, we were made to submit our phones at the gate due to security reasons. Their R&D facility is in one of the buildings and they test new advancements extensively there at the track located at the far end of the compound. We were guided to the tent where we gave our bikes to their engineers and walked the last 200m to the "Dr Washio" Classroom. I was late by 30 minutes and reached at 1030 owing to a wrong turn and going 10km in another direction. The hall was already buzzing with activity as other riders had had started a discussion with our instructors for the day. Mr Mithilesh was the Product lead for the RTR 310 and the other gentleman , whose name i could not catch, was leading the services. For those who , like me, have forgotten 10th and 11th standard Physics and Chemistry, this was a refresher. How the quick shifter works ( hall effect) and how the Limp home mode works, were explained in detail. We were also given a small overview on what makes the heated/cooled seats tick and what 11th standard chemistry has to say about this. ( heat exchange anyone?)

After a brief round on introduction , we sat through the session where feedback was taken on the positives and negatives of the bike. Each feedback was treated with 100% sincerely. That is when i noticed the last row of people sitting in the classroom were wearing TVS shirts. It then struck me about the true nature of this camp. The programmers from the TVS connect app, the lead designer for headlamp and DRL, the Quality assurance head and GM's of many franchises of TVS were in attendance and were paying close attention to concerns.

The camp was split into 3 sections : Theory , changes to bike and DIY hands on bike.

1. Theory : This session in the classroom covered the bike's features in detail. Many of us lamented the lack of feature knowledge the showroom The feedback was noted. We went through slides of what makes the RTR 310 engine tick and the advancements in tech that made this bike possible.

2. Changes to the bike : We were called to their facility to receive an ECU update and vibration dampers. A stripped down bike was shown and the changes that were to be done were explained in detail. Changes to ECU would mean a more aggressive response and reduction on lag we felt earlier ( which in my case led to bike "coughing at times" on urban mode 50-60kph") and new dampers which aimed to reduce the vibrations in the mid band.

3. DIY session : This session was post lunch , but was by far the most exciting session. Post lunch while most folks tend to tune off for a bit, the 25 of us were listening in rapt attention to our instructor as he showed us part by part , the sections of the engine and covered the Preload adjustments, chain lube cleaning and clutch cable adjustment. We were instructed to measure the angle of quick shifter (21 Degrees) and also to calculate the unladen sag and the laden sag to ensure that the difference is in the ballpark of 42mm or 30% of travel for optimal setup.

Post this session , all of us were corralled back to the classroom where we had a fun trivia session with the 1st and 2nd prize winners getting a TVS smart connect S20X Bluetooth intercom while 3rd and 4th getting t shirts.
The trivia was based on what we had learnt during the day and basics from the owners manual.

As the day came to a close our bikes were lined up ready to go. A video was taken of a slow rollout of all the bikes present and we were itching to test out the changes engine mapping. I rode back the 50km with a wide grin plastered across my face. The response was crisper and the exhaust note at higher revs was pure music to my ears.

I need to ride it more extensively and feel the nature of the changes made in various settings.

If anyone from our forum was there yesterday , or going today, please do chime in with your experience.
doomketu is offline   (5) Thanks
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