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-   -   Driving in the Rains - Tips (https://www.team-bhp.com/forum/technical-stuff/20950-driving-rains-tips-10.html)

gd1418 1st September 2007 10:39

An after market defogger is fixed on the rear windscreen. Whether the AC has a heater or not is immaterial to that. A defogger works with electricity. I don't remember the make of the defogger that I fixed on my Esteem LX. That was long time ago. I think it costed including installation around 2K.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Torqy (Post 549517)
Hi gd1418,

My Bolero has a/c with no heater. Can i still fix a defogger?
Which make of defogger did you use?
How much does it cost?

Thanks in advance,

-- Torqy


saildrive 1st September 2007 12:24

Hi Guys

Is there anyone out there who has fixed a rear window wiper after not having the slot for it and with regards to defogger, isnt it that defogger on the rear are the lines (red ones) on the windscreen?

Also since I have neither the defogger and the rear wiper, will there be a issue with the warranty of the car as the dealer has said that there is no slot where he can fix the wiper.

sathya_nars 3rd September 2007 10:22

In my trip last weekend, it rained and after it stopped, there were water drops on rear window. I switched on rear defogger for sometime (<2 mins or so) and window was almost clear. It works very well to dry water drops.

Steeroid 3rd September 2007 10:41

Quote:

Originally Posted by gkrishn (Post 549833)
Yes, under heavy rains, using them has increased the rear visibility drastically. But do you need that? Except may be when your on reverse gear.

Yes you do. Hatchbacks, SUVs and even notchbacks need a rear windscreen wiper because of the flow of water/muck over the vehicle. The airflow towards the end of the vehicle is into the backside, hence vehicles without a large boot tend to accumulate muck and rainwater on their rear windscreens more than those with a full boot.

This is why you see a rear windscreen wiper on most SUVs, most premium hatches and on almost all notchbacks like the Accent Viva.

And not for THIS:

Quote:

Originally Posted by gkrishn (Post 549833)
Believe me, i have used it mostly to show off... hey i have a rear wiperlol:

PS: A rear wiper is usually made of paper and is used mostly in Euro and US markets as people here prefer more conventional and hygenic methods. Are you referring to the rear wiper or to the rear windscreen wiper? ;)

sathya_nars 3rd September 2007 11:23

Quote:

Originally Posted by Steeroid (Post 551621)
Are you referring to the rear wiper or to the rear windscreen wiper? ;)

Oops! What are these two? I thought these are used in same context and essentially mean the same.

santosh.s 3rd September 2007 11:35

Quote:

Originally Posted by sathya_nars (Post 551665)
Oops! What are these two? I thought these are used in same context and essentially mean the same.

I was just thinking about the first context, how exactly can one show it off??lol:

gkrishn 3rd September 2007 11:36

Quote:

Originally Posted by Steeroid (Post 551621)
Yes you do. Hatchbacks, SUVs and even notchbacks need a rear windscreen wiper because of the flow of water/muck over the vehicle. The airflow towards the end of the vehicle is into the backside, hence vehicles without a large boot tend to accumulate muck and rainwater on their rear windscreens more than those with a full boot.

This is why you see a rear windscreen wiper on most SUVs, most premium hatches and on almost all notchbacks like the Accent Viva.

And not for THIS:

Yeah, i knew some logical explanation exist. I mentioned some thing like this in my first post on this topic. Thanks for the details.

Quote:

PS: A rear wiper is usually made of paper and is used mostly in Euro and US markets as people here prefer more conventional and hygenic methods. Are you referring to the rear wiper or to the rear windscreen wiper? ;)
BAD... BAD... I meant only windscreen wipers.

Quote:

Originally Posted by sathya_nars (Post 551665)
Oops! What are these two? I thought these are used in same context and essentially mean the same.

See that wink at the end of his message??!? thats the clue... :p

Thad E Ginathom 3rd September 2007 11:41

Since coming to India I have learnt that there is nothing hygienic about wiping one's rear with a piece of paper!

And wiping the glass with pieces of paper tends to lead to scratches...

Keeping the front windscreen clean...

I never seem to see people in Chennai using the screen wash. Why is this? It is invaluable for making sure one can see.

gd1418 3rd September 2007 13:34

Yes they are 'those red lines' on the rear windscreen but only if as OEM. The after market defoggers are lines that you will generally see as silvery or white in colour.

Quote:

Originally Posted by saildrive (Post 550423)
Hi Guys

Is there anyone out there who has fixed a rear window wiper after not having the slot for it and with regards to defogger, isnt it that defogger on the rear are the lines (red ones) on the windscreen?

Also since I have neither the defogger and the rear wiper, will there be a issue with the warranty of the car as the dealer has said that there is no slot where he can fix the wiper.


rocksterraghu 14th September 2007 14:15

I bumped into this thread since vid had given a link somewhere. Some real good inputs here! :)

I'd like to add, don't go close to buses and trucks, the oil from their exhaust sticks onto the windscreen, making it mandatory for you to use the spray option of the wiper. Sometimes, annoying and distracting.

anupmathur 14th September 2007 19:42

Quote:

Originally Posted by Steeroid (Post 551621)
PS: A rear wiper is usually made of paper and is used mostly in Euro and US markets as people here prefer more conventional and hygenic methods. Are you referring to the rear wiper or to the rear windscreen wiper? ;)

Hahahah....haha! I love this!

And also this:

Quote:

Originally Posted by Steeroid (Post 551621)
The airflow towards the end of the vehicle is into the backside, ...

Sam Kapasi would love this too.

BaCkSeAtDrIVeR 22nd March 2008 22:29

How good / bad is it to cover the horns with polyethylene covers (the kind you get from shopping malls) during the rains? Is it good or bad for the horns? Asking because my OEM horns are hinting at a "sore throat" after just one drive in the rain.

PS;- I searched this forum this thread and even google for an answer. And look at the first link google threw up - Vehicle front end panel with horn cover - US Patent 6347823

mithun 27th March 2008 15:54

Quote:

Originally Posted by BaCkSeAtDrIVeR (Post 767781)
How good / bad is it to cover the horns with polyethylene covers (the kind you get from shopping malls) during the rains? Is it good or bad for the horns? Asking because my OEM horns are hinting at a "sore throat" after just one drive in the rain.

PS;- I searched this forum this thread and even google for an answer. And look at the first link google threw up - Vehicle front end panel with horn cover - US Patent 6347823

Although it's not a bad idea, but most of the horns are waterproof & they will work as before when they are dry !

V-16 7th June 2008 03:26

Monsoon Driving Tips.
 
Monsoons remind me of piping hot tea and pakoras.
Of indulging in hot delicacies and extra sweet foods.
Of charbroiled Bhutta (corn on the cob) and walking in the rains.
Of getting mucky and wet playing rugby or soccer with friends, and sipping Rum and Coke while nibbling on hot vada pav or omlette pav.

Its also the time to get your ride in gear to tackle the monsoons. Actually we should undertake this when monsoons were around the corner.

Let us see below on how to get ready for the rains.

1). Getting your car ready for the monsoons and
2). Monsoon driving tips.

Went through the whole index but could not find a thread on Monsoon Driving Tips. We all are enthusiastic drivers and what better weather to drive than the Rains.
Everything is so pristine, clean and green. Lets see on how to get ready to meet the monsoons and have a safe driving experience.


Getting ready for the monsoons:

Start with a pre-monsoon checks and service.
Getting your car serviced before monsoons set in. This is the time to check the following;

WIPERS:
Check for worn out, cracked or simply missing wipers, both, front and if equipped, in the rear. Also check the condition of the arms. Good wipers means good visibility. These are very important tools to ferry you across monsoons without problems. The best way to clean wipers is to pinch the blades with a cloth dampened with diesel and run it down the entire blade a few times in a single motion. This will clean the blades throughly and remove any stubborn dust or grime accumulated over a period. If that does not work, replace the blades. Also check the windscreen washer nozzles.

TYRES:
This is the right time to get your tyres changed if you have been running your car with old and/or worn out tyres. Check for 1.5-2mm tread groove depth in all 5 tyres. That means your spare too.
Check the tyres for cuts, especially on the sidewalls and small stones and objects that may get lodged in the grooves. Get rid of these.
Check alignment, wheel balancing and uneven wear of the treads.
Check your tyre pressure levels at all refuelling visits to the pump. A simple check for improper tyre pressure or misaligned tyres is if the car pulls to either side when driving.
Keep in mind that tyres do not wear uniformly. Therefore all tyres should be rotated, including the spare tyre.
Maintaining proper tyre pressure not only increases the life of your tyre but aides in improving the fuel economy.

BRAKES:

Brakes are your lifeline whether rains or no rains. Check for their proper functioning and the condition of the liners, pads, drums, discs. Also check for any leakages in the brake line and excessive pedal travel. This also means check your hand/parking brakes.
At this juncture check for worn out or missing brake, accelerator and clutch pedal pads and replace at the slightest sign of wear and tear. You will be surprised at the percentage of cars missing pads on the glistening metal of well polished pedals.

ELECTRICALS, AND MISCELLANEOUS CHECKS:

It is as important to be seen by other motorists as it is to see, in a heavy downpour, therefore check your lights.
Check for any fused bulbs and cracked or broken lenses. You do not want water seeping through to the electrical system and play havoc. Make sure all the lights, indicators, high and low beam bulbs and fog lamps if any are all working.
This is a good time for cars with smoked lenses to revert back to the normal lenses for good visibility.
Check for window travel, power/electrical or manual. Get your gremlins sorted out whether a malfunctioning power window switch or a worn out thread of a manual window winder. You dont want to be stuck with the window up or down in a downpour.
Apply gel after cleaning, to the battery terminals to avoid acidic deposits
Check the A/C, horn and rear window de-fogger.
For cars with distributors, check the rotor and condenser and the distributor cap
For Diesel cars check the working of the heater and the glow lamp (for older gen diesels)
If necessary get an anti corrosion treatment for the car.
Ensure all the necessary tools of the car are present. Jack, tommy and wheel spanner being of prime importance here.


Having charted the above pre monsoon precautions now lets take a look at;

Monsoon Driving Tips:

Dry yourself before entering the car especially your shoes/feet. Sometimes this is not possible to achieve in the maximum sense of the word but do ensure that your feet and shoes are dry. Follow this to avoid your feet from slipping on the pedals, which may lead to serious mishaps.

"DRIVE SLOW". Nothing beats precaution.
It also takes a car longer to stop on wet roads than dry ones.
Driving at high speeds in the rain rain causes Hydroplaning. (This means your car is now a jet ski:D)
This happens because water accumulates in front of the tyres of a speeding car, faster than it can be pushed out, thus causing loss of traction.
Thus, a thin sheet of water is created between the road and the car tyres on which the tyres slide. This results in a horrifying complete loss of control in a matter of seconds. Hydroplaning can happen even in speeds in excess of only 40-50kmph. Any attempt at braking or steering the car, can lead to horrifying results.
Slow down when negotiating a puddle and avoid driving at the edge/last lanes of the road or through a harmless looking puddle especially in unfamiliar areas. Normaly the corner lanes of most roads have accumulated water.

Allot more travel time than normal, in wet weather.

Maintain a safe distance from the vehicle in front of you. This means a greater distance than you would normally maintain.
Say a two to three car distance at least and this is in city driving.
In highway driving make that distance at least three times the city distance i.e. 8-12 cars minimum.

Avoid excessive braking. This can cause skidding.
Always expect the other cars to have a weaker set of brakes than yours. This will keep you more careful.

Avoid driving in low visibility or at night/in darkness:
Switch on the parking lights to enable others to see you.
In dense rain, switch on the headlamps in the low beam mode.
If visibility is very poor, pull over to a safe place and switch on the hazard lamps. Whatever you do, do not try to get out of the car. You are safer in there.

Always carry an umbrella and a torch in the car for emergency.

Be cautious for open manholes and other objects and keep a lookout for road signs. Always also follow the traffic lights to ensure that someone else does not run into you.

Do not venture in flooded areas. It is always safer to turn around to a more familiar and safer domain

Keep your windscreen washer reservoir full. Preferably with a few drops of mild, car shampoo added, to clean the grime from car tyres traveling ahead of you.

Avoid being in the path of speeding vehicles and two wheelers

Hope the above tips are useful.
Please feel free to add to the above guys.
Thanks and drive safe.:thumbs up

pingping 7th June 2008 07:31

Quote:

Originally Posted by V-16 (Post 857474)
WIPERS:
The best way to clean wipers is to pinch the blades with a cloth dampened with diesel and run it down the entire blade a few times in a single motion. This will clean the blades throughly and remove any stubborn dust or grime accumulated over a period.

Could some one say what are the other ways of cleaning the wipers, other than diesel. Moreover what are the fluids we can use in windscreen washer holder. I have heard we can use alcohol for this purpose. :)


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