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Old 21st July 2010, 12:29   #106
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"Langot" - never fails to crack me up. I think it is referred to as a 'skirt' in english. It's a strip of rubber(generally recycled tube) between the wheel and tyre-tube.

Other hilarious terms that I have heard.

Radio water - Radiator
Mobil - Generic term for all engine oils
Crimping - King pin

Also loads of other terms that I can't recall right now. It's always interesting to try and figure out how they start using the terms as it's a mix of english technical terms with loads of local influence.
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Old 24th July 2010, 01:27   #107
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Hey Guys Fun Thread...I recall our Fiat mechanic referring to "Radiwater" too. He used to call the silencer as the "Dholki". There was a leak in the silencer of our beloved Fiat and he put it across very funnily "Saabji, Dholki me pinchar hai aur bailding ke baad jhand karana padega" and i burst into laughter. I was barely 10 but i still remember it till date. Typical North Indian Mechanic. BTW: "Jhand" means grinding off the excess filler weld but can be interpreted in many ways. . Oiling the rear leafsprings was more known as "Kamani ki malish".
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Old 24th July 2010, 02:12   #108
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In Goa some drivers call the shock absorber "chokupser" (pronounced chalk-up-sir)
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Old 24th July 2010, 02:37   #109
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grandkruizer View Post
Dicky=trunk, boot
Even I have heard it when I was a kid; but what is the origin of the word. I can't find any correlation among boot, trunk and dicky. Coming to think of it, there is no word in English or any Indian language called dicky
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Old 24th July 2010, 03:02   #110
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gooney View Post
Even I have heard it when I was a kid; but what is the origin of the word. I can't find any correlation among boot, trunk and dicky. Coming to think of it, there is no word in English or any Indian language called dicky
"Dicky" is actually a seat in the boot, popular in early cars (1920s I would guess from the below wiki entry). As noted below, as speeds increased, the seat became dangerous and was discarded. The name somehow carried on and now a boot (not the seat) is called a dicky.

Rumble seat - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Quote:
A rumble seat, dicky seat, dickie seat or dickey seat is an upholstered exterior seat which hinges or otherwise opens out from the rear deck of a pre-World War II automobile, and seats one or more passengers. In a carriage, a rumble (short for "rumble-tumble") was a seat behind the body used by servants. Roadster, Coupe and Cabriolet auto body styles were offered with either a luggage compartment or a rumble seat in the deck. Models equipped with a rumble seat were often referred to as a sport coupe or sport roadster.
In America, this type of seating became largely obsolete in the mid-1930s when cars became too fast and streamlined for the comfort of passengers in such a seat. Their popularity was further diminished by the frequent injuries, including decapitation that sometimes occurred in accidents. Rumble seat passengers were essentially seated out in the elements, and received little or no protection from the regular passenger compartment top. Folding tops and side curtains for rumble seats were available for some cars (including the Ford Model A) but never achieved much popularity. It is possible that the last American-built cars with a rumble seat were the 1939 Ford[1] and 1939 Dodge[2] and Plymouth.[3]
Prior to World War I, a single, center-mounted rumble seat was sometimes referred to as a mother-in-law seat.
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Last edited by echo77 : 24th July 2010 at 03:07.
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Old 24th July 2010, 03:31   #111
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"dicky" - I don't know about this name existing in automobile world or nt but this one of my friend's name.

Coming to the topic, I was once in a situation where it took mroe than 30 mins to realise what a mechanic told me. he was repeating oral oral oral oral again and again when I kept asking him what? what? what? what? . Then finally, a guy working at his garage and a bit educated said its an OVERHAUL!

I Couldn't control my laughter and that day I couldn't even have my food properly coz my stomach hurting a lot cause of this incident.
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Old 24th July 2010, 11:33   #112
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In my area, for many mechanics any fastner is "Nut". May it be Nut, Bolt or Screw.

"Chaar inch lamba nut chahiye" is a common demand at spares shop. :-)

Also, Hero Honda Splendor is pronounced as "Shilinder" and Passion as "Fashion"

Mirchi Bulb = Halogen Bulb

Fokss = Wheel Spokes

Stool Kit = Tool Kit

Fox Lite = Fog Lamp

Last edited by GTO : 13th January 2012 at 15:41. Reason: Please use the EDIT or MULTI-QUOTE buttons instead of typing one post after another!
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Old 27th July 2010, 18:30   #113
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Quote:
Originally Posted by echo77 View Post
"Dicky" is actually a seat in the boot, popular in early cars (1920s I would guess from the below wiki entry).
Ah! Makes sense. It was an amazing piece of information. Thank you so much echo77.
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Old 17th April 2011, 15:00   #114
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Default Re: Weird & Wacky terms used in Indian automotive sector

This one's found in almost every gully in Bangalore........

PUNCHER SHOP.......
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Old 10th May 2011, 02:04   #115
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Default Re: Weird & Wacky terms used in Indian automotive sector

This one really got my goat once. "Saar phoose/phooj uud gaya hai.".
It means, "Sir, the fuse has blown.".

"Dermina pe jang lag gaya hai sir.".
It means, "Terminal has rusted sir.".

"Aapka aantin toota hai"
It means, "Your antenna is broken.".


Quote:
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...Further, katta in the local slang personifies a beautiful lady.
Katta in our local slang means diss (which is also a slang word).
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Old 10th May 2011, 13:10   #116
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Default Re: Weird & Wacky terms used in Indian automotive sector

When a tyre loses it's treads, they say, "Tyre chikna ho gaya hai!"
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Old 10th May 2011, 13:12   #117
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Default Re: Weird & Wacky terms used in Indian automotive sector

^^ I have even heard people saying "Tire gota ho gaya hai!"
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Old 10th May 2011, 13:57   #118
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Default Re: Weird & Wacky terms used in Indian automotive sector

Quote:
Originally Posted by Akhilesh Rai View Post
... PUNCHER SHOP ...
Variants of this spelling exist all over India: "Pancher", "Pincher", etc. Ditto in Devanagari script: "पैंचर" or "पिंचर".
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Old 10th May 2011, 13:59   #119
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Default Re: Weird & Wacky terms used in Indian automotive sector

My driver calls a Swift, "Shift".
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Old 24th May 2011, 20:38   #120
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Default Re: Weird & Wacky terms used in Indian automotive sector

The most common thing (across mechanic to plumber) is 'Washer'

waaysher
waysar
vaisar...etc!

Once was getting my bike serviced. The guy replaced the 'crush washer' on the drain port. He called it 'Faltu wayser'
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