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Old 11th October 2022, 22:19   #466
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Re: Fun & Interesting Trivia on the Indian Car Scene

Indian car scene fifty years ago.
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Old 11th November 2022, 12:58   #467
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Re: Fun & Interesting Trivia on the Indian Car Scene

A joke going around in vintage bike circles:-

Q. What is the greatest contribution of M/s Classic Legends to our automobile scenario? After all, they have relaunched Brand Jawa and Brand Yezdi as repackaged classics in a contemporary but legendary way?

A. The resale prices of the older Mysore made Jawas and Yezdis have jumped through the roof.

That's their greatest contribution, despite the fact that M/s Classic Legends Private Limited are selling miniscule numbers of both the classic and legendary brands.
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Old 11th November 2022, 14:07   #468
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Re: Fun & Interesting Trivia on the Indian Car Scene

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Originally Posted by PGA View Post
Indian car scene fifty years ago.
The ambassador cost Rs. 7.3L by 2022 rupee valuation and the price hike was around Rs. 5000, again by 2022 valuation. I cannot say if cost of an ambassador of that era sounds reasonable by today's valuation, but the hike seems to be. These days both the cost of the car and each hike, especially as you go up the range, seems to make very little or no sense, even if one were to retain it for decade plus!

Last edited by SR-71 : 11th November 2022 at 14:09.
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Old 11th November 2022, 15:34   #469
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Re: Fun & Interesting Trivia on the Indian Car Scene

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Originally Posted by SR-71 View Post
The ambassador cost Rs. 7.3L by 2022 rupee valuation and the price hike was around Rs. 5000, again by 2022 valuation. I cannot say if cost of an ambassador of that era sounds reasonable by today's valuation, but the hike seems to be. These days both the cost of the car and each hike, especially as you go up the range, seems to make very little or no sense, even if one were to retain it for decade plus!
I am not very sure how you calculated the 2022 valuation. But if you do the current valuation VS historic valuation compared to gold - we will see a totally different prices here.

for eg. 10 grams of gold was for Rs. 202 in 1972 VS Rs. 53,095 today.
With that comparison an ambassador would cost a whopping 44.7 lacs in today's money. and a minuscule price hike of Rs. 127 would amount to Rs. 33,700 today.

No wonder our elder generation still believes in investing in gold instead of anything else.
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Old 11th November 2022, 16:35   #470
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Re: Fun & Interesting Trivia on the Indian Car Scene

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Originally Posted by samyakmodi View Post
I am not very sure how you calculated the 2022 valuation. But if you do the current valuation VS historic valuation compared to gold
I am a financial noob but if I am not wrong, currency and other investment instruments like gold and stocks and bonds do not grow by the same proportion though there is some co-relation. The investment instruments tend to run ahead and fall behind based time to time on many parameters. The buying power of the currency on the other hand is impacted by inflation.

The calculator I used is simple computation of buying power of the rupee, a.la an inflation calculator. There are dime a dozen out there on the internet that helps us compute for any currency you want. If this is not right, I would be happy to be corrected on the right method of computation for buying power of the currency.

Last edited by SR-71 : 11th November 2022 at 16:36.
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Old 18th February 2023, 10:00   #471
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Re: Fun & Interesting Trivia on the Indian Car Scene

Flipping through the pages of Jawaharlal Nehru's The Discovery of India, I came across passages referring to pre independence India's failed attempt at establishing automobile manufacturing units in India.

The following screenshots have been sourced from here.

Background

Fun & Interesting Trivia on the Indian Car Scene-img_20230218_094549.jpg

The Attempt

Fun & Interesting Trivia on the Indian Car Scene-img_20230218_094516.jpg


The Attempt cont'd...

Fun & Interesting Trivia on the Indian Car Scene-img_20230218_094134.jpg

Page Nos: 410-412
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Old 18th February 2023, 16:06   #472
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Re: Fun & Interesting Trivia on the Indian Car Scene

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Originally Posted by GTO View Post
So here's some interesting trivia for non-Bombay folk. This road in Mahim is the ONLY one I've seen anywhere in India, which is open one way in the North -> South direction (first half of the day), and South -> North one way in the second half. Basically, one-way in the direction of rush hour traffic.

This is old Cadell road, that ends at Mahim Church. Sharing pictures going to the suburban side. In the morning, it's the other way around.

Ends at the Mahim Church:
Attachment 2275322
Actually this is arrangement is very very common in many many roads of Kolkata. Out here it is 6 am to 2PM and 2PM to 10PM, 10PM to 6 am I guess all streets are two way including the ones which are flow controlled.

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Originally Posted by cuboid View Post
Couple of roads in Kolkata CBD also has the time-dependent-one-way-traffic. Park Street used to have traffic East-West till 2pm, and after 2pm, it becomes West-East. Same thing was there for portion of roads near Exide junction.
Not just Park Street, Shakespeare Sarani, Wood Street, Camac St, Rabindra Sarani, Ho Chi Minh Sarani, College Street and many many more around that area of South Central Kolkata and few North Kolkata have traffic flow controlled by this arrangement.

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Originally Posted by akash_v12 View Post
My parentsí native town in Murshidabad, WB also has a road with a very similar system. They divide the day into four 6-hour slots and keep two way traffic open only for the night hours. Unfortunately, in a town of that size, I still havenít understood the purpose of doing do.
Out here in Kolkata, it is done to handle traffic in a much much smoother manner especially on narrower (compared to major roads), it is very safe too, no one has to worry about oncoming traffic.

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Originally Posted by dragracer567 View Post
Out of curiosity, does this get updated automatically in google maps?
As far as I have seen, it does get updated, at least in Kolkata.
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Old 18th February 2023, 17:51   #473
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Re: Fun & Interesting Trivia on the Indian Car Scene

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Originally Posted by dailydriver View Post
Flipping through the pages of Jawaharlal Nehru's The Discovery of India, I came across passages referring to pre independence India's failed attempt at establishing automobile manufacturing units in India.

The following screenshots have been sourced from
Thank you for sharing this. My apologies in advance to any British readers whose sentiments may be hurt going through this post. Moderators please excuse my for going off topic by a light year.

From consciously & systematically destroying the handloom and muslin industries of Bengal in the 1760s onwards to forcing farmers to cultivate opium and indigo at the expense of food grains and then taxing them {when city dwellers paid no income taxes} to wilfully following a policy to hinder development of Indian industry at every turn the British followed a well planned strategy of extracting $$ from this land to fatten the Bank of England and finance their conquest of other hapless lands in Africa and Middle East. The damage caused by the British Empire, in my opinion a force of evil, was comparable to the havoc wrought by Hitler only this that the British spread the pain, the killing and the looting in slow motion over 150 years. They were more cunning than Herr Hitler in that they boiled the frog slowly. Sadly as the world media is dominated by the Anglo-Saxon press little is written about the excesses of the British Empire nor is it taught in their schools and the average Britisher believes his grandfather's Empire was a force for good.

A list of some of the excesses of the British Empire as stated in the Western books:

Between 1857 and 1947 some number between 12 to 29 million Indian died from man made famines caused by forced cropping and taxation to be paid despite crop failures. This in a period when the average population of undivided India was about 250 million. In comparison evil Hitler killed 6 million in the gas chambers. Let the numbers speak.

Some number between 20,000* and 100,000** Kenyans died in British concentration camps in the Mau Mau rebellion in the late 1940s early 1950s. The British confiscated the fertile lands of the Kenyan tribes, gave them to British settlers, imposed a cash tax on the Kenyans who only knew a barter economy and the only way to pay that tax in cash was to work as indentured labour on the very farms that had been stolen from them. And when the protests started {called the Mau Mau rebellion} jet fighter bombers were used to level entire villages to suppress it.
*official British historian David Anderson; ** Caroline Elkins independent researcher and author

Some studies by the Columbia University,USA suggest Britain took away $44.9 trillion from India between 1765 and 1947. While I read through that I'll confess I'm not an economist to understand how that figure was arrived at or how accurate it is except to say that the loot was gargantuan. But figures aside the key point was that the foreign exchange ie GBP+gold+silver being earned by India in those 180 years was never ever ever sent to India. It was retained in the UK under the streets of London in control of the British Govt. and the Indian exporter was paid in INR at an exchange rate fixed to not favour the INR. If that forex had been available to an independent India maybe, just maybe we would have had our own Meiji Restoration in the 1800s like Japan did. Collectively in the 30 years from 1899 to 1929 India had the second largest trade surplus in the world after USA thanks to raw material exports but our per capita remained unchanged even though in that period our population grew only nominally.

One third of all the tax collected in India, mainly from farmers {income tax on the rich including the British came only in the 1930s} was paid to Britain under an account maintained by the Secretary of State for India. This money was spent in Britain for Britain or in conquering newer colonies! Only 2/3rds of the tax collected was spent in India a large part of which then went to pay for the British Indian Army and Police to keep the wretched colonial serfs in control.

I could go one and on. The systematic loot of India under the sophisticated guise of laws and Crown policies make for staggering reading. The embellished this smoothness under layers of titles, gowns, crowns and handouts to the loyalists among the colonials. We condemn today invaders such as Nadir Shah and Mohd of Gazni for their looting of India but nothing compares to the smoothness and scale of the British. The only thing comparable is their belief that their Raj was a force for good.

Last edited by V.Narayan : 18th February 2023 at 17:59.
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Old 7th March 2023, 02:34   #474
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Re: Fun & Interesting Trivia on the Indian Car Scene

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Originally Posted by anjan_c2007 View Post

The 407 captured a sizeable pie of the LCV market and soon became the market leader. Toyota and Mazda found the going tough and Nissan and Allwyn too surrendered.
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Toyota and Mazda had to close shop and retreat.
Well to their credit Toyota didn't forget their lesson. Because a generation later a breadbox on wheels dethroned the mighty Sumo. Payback.
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