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Old 12th June 2020, 16:44   #391
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Default Re: Long-term Parking : Do's and Don'ts

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My Ecosport was due for its yearly service in May,2020. Although the car has covered only 8k kms in this 1 year period but the 1 year time interval has come up. This is the 20k km service. Now I am confused if I should give it for service now or rather hold on to it for next 2-3 months till the Covid crisis has played out. My car is under extended warranty till 5 years and hence I was wondering if Ford cites this service delay in any future warranty related claim that may arise. What shall I do?
Update to my earlier query. So Ford is allowing a 2 month extension to any service requirement that falls down during this pandemic period. One can drive the car for 1500 kms over and above the allocated number of kms for that year.

Honestly I feel that is a bit less and they should increase it since the pandemic is currently very much rampant and nothing has really changed. Rather the scale of the problem has only increased since the lockdown started and the lockdown as such cannot be seen as point of reference for such decisions. For instance in my case, the car's service was due in May and the 2 month extension pushes it to July but sadly, the number of cases are rapidly increasing. I may ultimately be forced to opt for the pick up and drop option eventually to save my warranty if it comes to that.
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Old 30th June 2020, 15:09   #392
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Default Immobilised car - bringing back to life

I am now stuck outside India due to COVID-19 and it seems international flights may start from mid July only.

Now my car (Fiat Grande Punto Diesel 90hp, 2016) is in Hyderabad, is not even started since February. I am sure the battery would be dead and the tires would be flat by the time I get a flight and reach home in July. I am also apprehensive about the oil situation.
Additional problem is that it is in cellar, so no option of using a crane.

What are my best options?

Is there any service provider for arranging a stand-by battery and a portable air compressor ?

In theory, as a DIY, I can jump start the car, order a portable compressor to pressurize the tires and drive it to service center. But I have several apprehensions on that - what if it stops on the way and doesnt start again, what if the tires start losing air (perhaps cracks due to staying flat for long), what of the oil turned bad and may cause problem?, etc,

Please help.

Last edited by SKavuri : 30th June 2020 at 15:10. Reason: added a word
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Old 30th June 2020, 16:06   #393
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Default Re: Immobilised car - bringing back to life

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Originally Posted by SKavuri View Post
I am now stuck outside India due to COVID-19 and it seems international flights may start from mid July only.

Now my car (Fiat Grande Punto Diesel 90hp, 2016) is in Hyderabad, is not even started since February. I am sure the battery would be dead and the tires would be flat by the time I get a flight and reach home in July. I am also apprehensive about the oil situation.
Additional problem is that it is in cellar, so no option of using a crane.

What are my best options?

Is there any service provider for arranging a stand-by battery and a portable air compressor ?

In theory, as a DIY, I can jump start the car, order a portable compressor to pressurize the tires and drive it to service center. But I have several apprehensions on that - what if it stops on the way and doesnt start again, what if the tires start losing air (perhaps cracks due to staying flat for long), what of the oil turned bad and may cause problem?, etc,

Please help.
Relax, you dont need to be so concerned. Modern cars are pretty reliable and you should be able to find your car in good shape once you are back.

Once you are here, open the engine bay and check if animals are resting inside. Also check if anything like belts or hoses or wires are out of place due to animals coming and going. If everything is in place, clean the interiors and get inside the car.

I hope you didnt have your handbrakes on. If you did have them ON, release them. Turn the key to ignition ON, ensure all lights are working and you should be able to hear the fuel pump running. Now, start the car. If the battery is dead the car wont start. Get a spare battery and jumper cables and start the car.

Now, only two things you need to be concerned of is the hand brake getting jammed and the clutch plate stuck to the flywheel. In both cases vehicle wont move. Refer the forum for detailed threads on that.

If everything is good, go to a tyre shop and check for flat spots and general condition of the tyres. If the engine oil hasn't been changed in more than a year, get all the fluids changed.

You should be good to go.
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Old 30th June 2020, 17:12   #394
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Default Re: Long-term Parking : Do's and Don'ts

A friend of mine had left his Nano unused for a few months during this lockdown, it was parked outside as usual. Once the car started again , it was sent for a routine service and the technicians have found that 3\4 wheel bearings are damaged. Its in warranty and therefore not a financial hit.

It looks like long term parking outside has damaged the wheel bearings. Has anyone else faced this issue?
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Old 30th June 2020, 17:35   #395
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Default Re: Long-term Parking : Do's and Don'ts

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Originally Posted by Kosfactor View Post
A friend of mine had left his Nano unused for a few months during this lockdown, it was parked outside as usual. Once the car started again , it was sent for a routine service and the technicians have found that 3\4 wheel bearings are damaged. Its in warranty and therefore not a financial hit.

It looks like long term parking outside has damaged the wheel bearings. Has anyone else faced this issue?
Some of my vehicles, the Jeep or the Palio isnt used for months. I havent faced such an issue. The issue is mainly because of inferior quality bearings IMO.
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Old 2nd July 2020, 20:11   #396
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Default Re: Long-term Parking : Do's and Don'ts

For long term parking the car, is it advisable to fill the petrol/diesel tank full or leave it half and below.
The reason I am asking this is that I had heard in fuel tanks, the inside is not coated/painted. So if not filled up to the top, there is chance of corrosion on the tank walls. Same goes with pumps, its associated clamps etc, if not submerged or "wetted" with oil will start to corrode.
It does not matter if we keep using the vehicle as sloshing of the oil inside takes care of "wetting" the relevant parts, but once stationary for a long time, the non wetted parts will be exposed.
The people in the know can please elaborate as it is applicable for people who keep their vehicles parked for a long time, like mariners.
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Old 3rd July 2020, 10:27   #397
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Default Re: Long-term Parking : Do's and Don'ts

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Originally Posted by norhog View Post
For long term parking the car, is it advisable to fill the petrol/diesel tank full or leave it half and below.
The reason I am asking this is that I had heard in fuel tanks, the inside is not coated/painted. So if not filled up to the top, there is chance of corrosion on the tank walls. Same goes with pumps, its associated clamps etc, if not submerged or "wetted" with oil will start to corrode.
It does not matter if we keep using the vehicle as sloshing of the oil inside takes care of "wetting" the relevant parts, but once stationary for a long time, the non wetted parts will be exposed.
The people in the know can please elaborate as it is applicable for people who keep their vehicles parked for a long time, like mariners.
The reason for keeping the tank near full is that with less air there is less vapour/fumes in the tank which means less evaporation.
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Old 3rd July 2020, 11:16   #398
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Originally Posted by Aroy View Post
The reason for keeping the tank near full is that with less air there is less vapour/fumes in the tank which means less evaporation.

These days almost all fuel system and tanks are closed systems due to emission regulation. Which also means any fuel evaporation is kept within the tank / fuel system.

The main reason to keep a tank full is it is likely to rust less on the inside.
Some will claim it prevents water condensation too, but That is more a myth as there is only a minuscule amount of water in air. Enough to start corrosion though.
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Old 3rd July 2020, 11:30   #399
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Default Re: Long-term Parking : Do's and Don'ts

Since it is apparent that one can move his car and also get it serviced at the authorised service station, I plan to get the following inspected / replaced.

1. V Belt.
2. Coolant flush and radiator cleaning. Related hoses.
3. Timing chain inspection, etc.
4. Fuel filter cleaning / replacement.
5. Putting new O2 sensor (not related to long term parking, my car's both sensors were removed).

My Altis has been standing in the direct sun since 3 months. Have driven it / started it once in every 3 weeks during the lockdown. Interiors / exteriors were cleaned periodically. Battery terminals were cleaned and it was bench charged, so that aspect is taken care of. However I have not kept much petrol in the tank for all this period. What do I need to look in the fuel system? The car runs well.
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Old 3rd July 2020, 12:23   #400
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Default Re: Long-term Parking : Do's and Don'ts

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Originally Posted by Jeroen View Post
These days almost all fuel system and tanks are closed systems due to emission regulation. Which also means any fuel evaporation is kept within the tank / fuel system.

The main reason to keep a tank full is it is likely to rust less on the inside.
Some will claim it prevents water condensation too, but That is more a myth as there is only a minuscule amount of water in air. Enough to start corrosion though.
There is a vent provided in the cap which lets outside air in. The hole is provided to facilitate the fuel flow from the tank by letting air occupy the space the fuel did. If the tank is sealed then after some time the depleting fuel will create a vacuum. This will result in stoppage of fuel flow. Severe cases will partially collapse the fuel tank.
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Old 3rd July 2020, 12:33   #401
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Default Re: Long-term Parking : Do's and Don'ts

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Originally Posted by Aroy View Post
There is a vent provided in the cap which lets outside air in. The hole is provided to facilitate the fuel flow from the tank by letting air occupy the space the fuel did. If the tank is sealed then after some time the depleting fuel will create a vacuum. This will result in stoppage of fuel flow. Severe cases will partially collapse the fuel tank.
It is not just a hole, it is actually a dual check valve. So if a vacuum is created it will let some air in. To much pressure is vented out. With the engine switched off, ultimately the pressure in the tank will become identical to ambient (atmospheric) pressure. But that is not the same as it being open to the air.

Fuel disappearing through evaporation would require a permanent (preferable large) opening.

Evaporation is dependent on a number of factors. Temperature being an important one obviously. But also the amount of fluid surface is relevant. Not whether a tank is full or not. Although the more fuel, the longer it takes to warm up of course.

Just walk around a car park on a hot sunny day. Put your nose near the fuel caps. You should not smell any petrol/diesel. If you do, you are likely to have found yourself a car with a faulty petrol cap or a very old car that still vents to the atmosphere.

It it makes you feel better, park in the shade. But on modern cars, fuel evaporation should not be a problem.

Jeroen
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