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All-new Lamborghini Huracan Sterrato globally unveiled

The Lamborghini Huracan Sterrato will be limited to 1499 units, with production said to begin in February 2023.

Lamborghini has taken the wraps off the new Huracan Sterrato, at the Art Basel in Miami Beach.

The Huracan Sterrato is the brand's first all-terrain super sports car. It comes with a permanent all-wheel-drive configuration and plenty of other upgrades, making it capable of going both on and off the asphalt.

In terms of exterior design, the Sterrato comes with a pair of LED lights on the nose, flared wheel arches, a small lip spoiler at the rear, black roof rails and an air scoop on the roof. The Sterrato also has a 44 mm raised ground clearance compared to the Huracan EVO, while the track widths have also expanded by 30 mm at the front and 34 mm at the rear. Lamborghini has also changed the front bumper and provided aluminium underbody protection at the front. The all-terrain supercar runs on newly designed 19-inch wheels made specifically for the Sterrato while being shod with newly-developed Bridgestone off-road tyres.

Inside, the Sterrato carries forward most of the features and technology from the standard Huracan EVO. However, the new model does get its own driving modes with Strada, Sport & Rally. In addition to this, the instrument cluster on the Sterrato comes with new features like a digital inclinometer with a pitch & roll indicator, a compass, a steering angle indicator & a geographic coordinate indicator.

The Lamborghini Huracan Sterrato is powered by a 5.2-litre V10 engine producing 610 BHP & 560 Nm. The engine is paired with a 7-speed dual-clutch automatic transmission. The car features an electronically-controlled all-wheel-drive system with a rear mechanical self-locking differential. Lamborghini says the Sterrato is capable of sprinting from 0 - 100 km/h in 3.4 seconds while reaching a top speed of 260 km/h.

The Lamborghini Huracan Sterrato will be limited to 1499 units, with production said to begin in February 2023.

 
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