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Old 5th December 2018, 23:40   #1
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Default Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin

Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 has been launched in India at a price of 2.5L ex-showroom onwards, whereas the Continental GT 650 Twin is priced at 2.65L ex-showroom onwards.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6180b_cover_pic.jpg

Likes -
  • Perfect pricing, attracts both traditional customers and existing 'superbike' owners alike.
  • Smooth parallel twin engine with a very linear torque delivery. A 'Bullet' that can take on modern highways.
  • Excellent slip and assist clutch + 6 speed gearbox combination.
  • Nice exhaust note for a parallel twin motor.
  • Build quality is leagues ahead of any RE till date. Well built for the price.

Dislikes -
  • Riding stance and also other new age improvements may not appeal to the traditional Enfield fans.
  • Bit heavy and wide for those upgrading from smaller machines - will take time getting used to.
  • Straight line stability and suspension not the best, but not a dealbreaker either.
  • Some elements follow retro styling more than function - the instrument cluster, headlamps, mirrors, spokes + tube tyres as examples.
  • If making heads turn with looks and sound is your thing - this one pretty much flies under the radar.

Last edited by CrAzY dRiVeR : 6th December 2018 at 10:33.
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Old 6th December 2018, 00:24   #2
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Default Royal Enfield Interceptor 650

It was way back in April 2015 that the initial rumours regarding a twin cylinder Royal Enfield was first kicked off by a set of spy pictures featuring a parallel twin engine on the GT platform. But it was not until mid 2015 that the news was confirmed - when Sid Lal went on to confirm the development of a 750cc engine that would power future Enfield bikes. By November 2017, the 648cc parallel twin engine was unveiled along with the two brand new bikes that would go on sale with this new engine - the Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin. One year later, we finally have the bikes launched in the market - and first impressions suggest that the wait has been worth it.


Royal Enfield Interceptor 650

Interceptor 650 is the more mature version among the twins, designed to be a modern retro classic roadster which is easy to ride. Royal Enfield claims to have taken inspiration for this new machine from their iconic machine of the same name from the 60s.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6205b_1600.jpg

Christened 'Royal Enfield Interceptor 650'

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6221b_1600.jpg

Personally I like the classic looks of the Interceptor 650. In this silver colour it looks like a proper modern retro classic IMO, which has a timeless appeal to it without trying too hard!

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6197b_1600.jpg

The design has many similarities to other modern British retro classics like the Triumph Boneville, but it is also easily identifiable as a Royal Enfield - especially in the Indian context.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6187b_1600.jpg

The side profile is dominated by the large air (and oil) cooled engine, with a typical RE styled crankcase and chrome embellishments including that long and beautiful silencer.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6190b_1600.jpg

Dual silencer is undoubtedly the most striking element when viewed from the rear. It also helps distinguish this Royal Enfield from any other predecessor on sale in the Indian market.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6210b_1600.jpg

Design is a personal taste, but IMO - it comes across overall as a very mature and classic design that doesn't make any bold attempts to stand out from the crowd.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6257b_1600.jpg

A closer look at the frontend.

(Note - The windscreen here is an optional accessory. Details provided in below posts)

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6277b_1600.jpg

Royal Enfield logo proudly sitting on the tank of the Interceptor 650. Paint quality on the Interceptor is excellent. It does have a nice sparkle under sunlight!

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6304b_1600.jpg

Upon popular demand, here is the Interceptor 650 fitted with the touring seat, which comes standard with the Continental GT 650 and optional on the Interceptor. Looks good and much better on the Interceptor than the GT IMO.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6269b_1600.jpg

Last edited by CrAzY dRiVeR : 6th December 2018 at 10:37.
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Old 6th December 2018, 00:41   #3
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Default Continental GT 650 Twin

Continental GT 650 Twin

Continental GT is the sportier brand of the Royal Enfield lineup and draws inspiration from the cafe racing culture of the 60s.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6235b_1600.jpg

Christened 'Continental GT 650 Twin'

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6249b_1600.jpg

The design feels largely familiar though thanks to the Continental GT 535 which was introduced back in 2012.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6238b_1600.jpg

Specially from the front where the clip-on stance is trademark GT. The blacked out elements give the GT a sportier persona from the front, which is also backed up by the overall character of the bikes - especially the riding posture.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6227b_1600.jpg

As is the case with the Interceptor 650, that dual silencer is undoubtedly the most striking element when viewed from the rear.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6239b_1600.jpg

Love those dual rear pipes!

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6242b_1600.jpg

A closer look at the frontend.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6275b_1600.jpg

GT 650 gets a sportier version of the RE logo inline with its design aspirations.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6253b_1600.jpg

Not on popular demand , but just because I had the Interceptor seat handy when trying out the touring seats on the other bike. IMO - this seat suits the design of the GT better, whereas the touring seats feel a bit longer than needed, in a sporty design.

Of course, GT also gets a single seat (with the integrated cowl) as an optional accessory.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6271b_1600.jpg

Last edited by CrAzY dRiVeR : 6th December 2018 at 10:38.
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Old 6th December 2018, 01:05   #4
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Default Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin

As most people already know, both the motorcycles are powered by a 648cc parallel twin engine developing 47hp of power @ 7250rpm and 58Nm of torque @5250rpm. These bikes also features their first-ever slipper clutch and six speed gearbox!

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6262b_1600.jpg

Sound has a nice rumble to it thanks to the 270 degree firing order. RE thump fans will be disappointed as the volume is much more muted compared to their classics, but this really has a nice character to it - unlike the Kawasaki parallel twin 650 sound that I'm very much used to!

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_5964.jpg

Another look at the beautiful exhaust pipe! Looks very nice though I would have preferred a more Jawa'ish straight pipes. These pipes look sportier and suit the GT more than the Interceptor IMO. Just nitpicking - still love them!

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6274b_1600.jpg

Its still an air/oil cooled engine and although heat feels manageable - it surely can get a lot closer to the knees and clothing. RE has this metal protector to save the skin in such situations.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_5965.jpg

The parallel twin is wide compared to the bike! You can see how much the engine projects out of the tank in normal view. This below for the Continental -

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_5967.jpg

Whereas the same can be seen here for the Interceptor 650. A discussion with another prospective customer revealed that he was closely watching my knees when I was sitting on the bike - to see whether I was accidentally touching any parts of the engine - but that was not to be the case.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_5968.jpg

Oil cooler comes with a nice little mesh grille to protect it from the stuff thrown out by the front tyre. Foam padding visible on the sides, and should be to reduce noise from the panels. Surprised to find this on an RE, and the results of all these small touches show up in the final product when you take it on to the road!

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_5936.jpg

I'm not all that familiar with the specifics of the earlier RE range, but did it not have an oil filter this way earlier? Saw people crawling down to the bottom of the bike in disbelief upon seeing this oil filter. Good reason to go for bash plate protection - which is also provided by RE as an accessory!

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_5955.jpg

ECU placed beneath the seat on both the bikes -

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6266_1600.jpg

Last edited by CrAzY dRiVeR : 6th December 2018 at 10:48.
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Old 6th December 2018, 01:28   #5
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Default Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin

Sportier riding position on the GT 650. But the lean is quite manageable for sportbike riders. I personally had a couple of concerns with the riding position mentioned in detail during the test ride posts below!

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6282b_1600.jpg

Much more relaxed riding position of the Interceptor - though this is not your typical Bullet stance. There is a slight forward lean and also the footpegs are slightly rearset.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6281b_1600.jpg

Note - The rear footrest is rather rearset. Not a deal breaker for me IMO - and I'm a fan of proper upright stance. Anyways something you need to check for yourself at the showroom, specially if you are into long distance touring with minimal breaks.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6280b_1600.jpg

Speaking of seating posture - the slim tank on the GT is slightly better to hold with the legs ideally, but the stance is not perfect due to a couple of reasons - 1. The feet are still wide due to the footpegs and 2. The tank recess seems to have been designed keeping shorter riders in mind.

Tank capacity at 12.5 litres on the GT.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6272b_1600.jpg

Interceptor 650 seems more natural in that case, but you still need to watch out for the slightly rearward set footpegs and also a slight lean for the handlebars as compared to a typical Bullet / Thunderbird (see below posts) PS - Should not be a deal breaker, but I also happened to overhear this being discussed seriously by some hardcore Enfield fans in the showroom.

Tank capacity is slightly larger on the Interceptor at 13.7 litres.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6261b_1600.jpg

A closer look at the footpegs reveal how they have tried to bring it forward, but may not be forward enough for the traditional Bullet rider. Not convenient to stand up on the pegs and ride either! With my height - I had a weird crouched forward stance when I tried to stand up momentarily, and the knees are above the tank to close it either.

Note the gear lever as well.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_20181118_163440.jpg

Whereas the footpegs are unashamedly rearset as per the chassis on the Continental GT 650. The gear lever positioning is entirely different as well. Probably explains why the GT gets a heel protector whereas the Interceptor doesn't.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_20181118_163424.jpg

Same with the RHS footpeg and brake lever on the Continental 650, which is properly rear set.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_20181130_114445.jpg

However, in the Interceptor, they are brought forward for the rider - and some members have complained that this brings the shoes too close to the crankcase. I did not notice this issue, even with the thick woodlands.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_20181130_112153_1600.jpg

Many people seems to have complaints regarding the footpeg position - that it interferes when you place the feet on the ground, however - I did not face this issue. My height is 5'11 for reference. (Infact - this issue is really prominent on the Versys now that I realise it!). Many people seemed to have noted this as a concern, so definitely something worth checking out for yourself in the showroom.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-2016_0211_185954_216_1600.jpg

And absolutely no such concerns on the GT -

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-2018_1201_121527_295_1600.jpg

However, that has introduced a small problem of its own. The sidestand is hidden below the rider footrest and it is a hunt everytime thanks to my habit of wearing woodland shoes for casual commutes. Riding shoes should make things a little more difficult. Again, not a deal breaker, just a minor inconvenience.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-2018_1201_121542_300_1600.jpg

Single seat is optional this time around. Seat height of 798mm is pretty decent for India, and shouldn't raise much of a concern. This is lower than that of the Interceptor by 6mm - if it matters for your height in deciding between these two - or one can always swap the seats on either bikes as needed.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6285b_1600.jpg

Strangely enough - the seat of the GT650 is better suited for touring and pillion than that of the Interceptor 650 (Touring seat is optional on the latter). These seats are soft and thin - not a great combination for longer distances, and the length of the seat is lesser than the touring one too, thanks to the rear end shaping inwards eating into pillion space.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6224_1600.jpg

A friend asked the question though - doesn't this blur the differentiation between the GT and the Interceptor? Because the GT 535 was known for it's trademark single seat that completed its cafe racer look, and is optional this time around.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_20181130_114317.jpg

Rider's view on the Interceptor 650


Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6291_1600.jpg

Rider's view on the GT 650


Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6290_1600.jpg

A closer look at that triple clamp. Gets an RE logo, but frankly I'd have liked this whole unit to be a bit more sophisticated looking - This is one area that is always visible to the rider - and it does feel like its made of cast iron or something instead of new age alloys.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_5942.jpg

Something like the old Continental GT 535 -

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Oh wait! What about the clipons of the GT which were clearly mounted on the triple clamp earlier? Mounted this way now -

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6286_1600.jpg

The lower set position of the handlebars on the GT -
Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-2018_1201_120136_018_1600.jpg

Levers are simple and non-adjustable, but are positioned near correctly - No issues noticed there, but those with shorter hands may miss the adjustments.


Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6292_1600.jpg

Similarly with the brake lever (Note: The brake fluid reservoir cover shown here is not a standard unit).

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6294_1600.jpg

Last edited by CrAzY dRiVeR : 6th December 2018 at 10:58.
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Old 6th December 2018, 08:06   #6
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Default Re: Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin

The twins come with barbones electronics. There is a rather minimal twin pod console with two big analogue gauges for speed and rpm, a digital fuel gauge and can cycle through odo reading or two trip meters. ABS also comes as standard, and thats almost about it. There is no traction control, no driving modes etc - and RE would claim that it was kept this way as the motorcycle is meant to be accessible to new riders both from a complexity as well as price perspective.

Instrument console on the Continental GT 650. A rather minimal twin pod console with two big analogue gauges for speed and rpm, a digital fuel gauge and can cycle through odo reading or two trip meters.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6289_1600.jpg

Same unit on the Interceptor 650. RE could have given a more modern unit, and this will remain a concern area for people.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6218_1600.jpg

Dials are always backlit, though not evident during the daytime.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-2018_1201_120706_128_1600.jpg

Headlamps give it gives a classic look, but looks very outdated IMO - and a little bit out of place on a machine like the 650 Twins. The indicator units - even more so!

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6278_1600.jpg

Low beam -

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6167_1600.jpg

High beam -

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6168_1600.jpg

Lighting is pretty decent and a bit more than what I expected seeing the old school setup, but for highway night rides - tourers will need to upgrade. (Note - This pic was taken after around 6AM in the morning, so conditions were not pitch dark)

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-2018_0101_053242_006_1600.jpg

The tail lamp cluster on the Interceptor is finished in GT Silver, same as the fendors, whereas the same is gloss black on the Continental GT. (Note - Both these bikes have optional colours in which this spec would change).

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6298_1600.jpg

Looks pretty old school as are the headlamps and RE would claim that it is intentionally so!

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6300_1600.jpg

The tail lamp when lit up -

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6173b_1600.jpg

12V, 6A K95 dual horns from Uno Minda. Rated 117db. Most users wont feel the need to upgrade, although these horns are not as loud as seen on most 'Bullets' on the road.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_20181130_114410.jpg

Last edited by CrAzY dRiVeR : 6th December 2018 at 11:00.
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Old 6th December 2018, 08:19   #7
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Default Re: Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin

Front suspension duties are handled by a 41mm fork with 110mm of suspension travel.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_5927.jpg

Whereas the Interceptor 650 had silver fenders and their true aluminium alloy nature for the alloy spoke wheels, GT 650 had black forks, gloss black fenders and anodized black alloy wheels

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_5939.jpg

The combination really depends on the colour chosen. Some of the combinations available -


Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img20181115wa0000.jpg

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img20181115wa0001.jpg

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img20181115wa0002.jpg

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img20181115wa0003.jpg

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img20181115wa0004.jpg

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img20181115wa0005.jpg

Rear suspension duties are handled by dual units, gas charged and seems to be made by Gabriel. No more Paoli suspension that did duty on the earlier Continental GT! 5 speed preload adjustment is present, but doesn't look to be a simple affair - as is the case with remote preload adjuster present on more expensive 650s these days.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_5930.jpg

Good news is that Bosch dual channel ABS comes as standard.

Front unit is a 320mm single disc with a floating twin piston caliper from Bybre.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6296_1600.jpg

Whereas the rear unit is 240mm, ABS sensor rings clearly visible.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6297_1600.jpg

The newly developed twin cradle, tubular steel frame peeking through - which Royal Enfield claims as all new and developed by Harris Performance team. Although it looks similar to the one on the GT 535, this one is supposed to be larger and beefier to support the new 650 parallel twin engine.

(PS: Also note the finish under the fuel tank, and compare it to any other previous Enfields in the showroom! ).

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_5951.jpg

100/90 R18 tyres at the front -

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_5956.jpg

Of Pirelli phantom sportscomp make!

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_5957.jpg

Same at the rear in a 130/70 R18 configuration. Interestingly these are tubeless tyres, but in this application on the Royal Enfields with their alloy spoke wheels, they are run with tubes.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_5958.jpg

A look at the thread pattern on the rear.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_5959.jpg

And the front! Pirelli claims that these tyres were designed for classic motorcycles, but to deliver a sporty performance. A tyre change should cost around 9k for a set (Guessing based on the prices of Pirelli Sport Demon of the same size).

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_5962.jpg

I like that fact that they have used steel braided brake lines for the front -

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_5976.jpg

As well as the rear!

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_5978.jpg

The RHS panel can be opened with the key and reveals a seat release cable mechanism, a strapped tool kit and the battery sitting beneath it -

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6263_1600.jpg

Last edited by benbsb29 : 7th December 2018 at 09:46. Reason: Corrected typo - tubeless
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Old 6th December 2018, 08:40   #8
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Default Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin

Improvement areas -

The bike is clearly not without its share of rough edges, but I feel these are not deal breakers - particularly when the pricing is brought into the picture. The main concern however is the reliability, specially since the Himalayan episode.


My first and foremost complaint with the design is those headlamps. Although it gives the classic look, looks very outdated IMO - and a little bit out of place on a machine like the 650 Twins. Note - I consider the 650 Twins as modern retro classics, whereas the Jawa seems to be a more orthodox approach to a retro classic. Such a headlamp may not look as much out of place on the Jawa.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_5921.jpg

Then there is this weld! This clearly is something that had to be sorted out before production begins - such an eyesore, on an otherwise well finished motorcycle!

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6303_1600.jpg

And is present on both the sides of the pillion grab rail.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_5932.jpg

Those grand silencers are not really in perfect alignment - Initially I dismissed it as the eyes playing tricks due to the saree guard on one side -

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_20181130_112210_1600.jpg

But then the right silencer is clearly a palm length away from the rear splashguard

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_20181130_112219_1600.jpg

Whereas the left is only about 3/4th of the same. Sorry for the not so clear pic here, but you can also judge with respect to the distance from the rear shock

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_20181130_112225_1600.jpg

Lots of visible nuts and bolts, though I'm not sure if it serves to add to the 'all metal charm'. Easily fixed with the accessory bikini fairings though. (Pics in the below posts)

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_5937.jpg

Not sure how the chasis got this damage so early in its life on a showroom display bike. No damage to adjacent panels - so probably points that it might have missed QC?

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_5953.jpg

Mirrors on the Interceptor 650 were just about useful, whereas the ones on the CGT was way off, not happy as I kept adjusting during TD, but finally left it. Royal Enfield offers various optional RVMs for touring, bar-end mirrors etc - which might be an option worth looking into - for looks and functionality.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-2016_0211_192237_060_1600.jpg

Now I'm really nitpicking - but that nice large silencer has a rough finish if you really poke into the edges -

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_5960.jpg

Had a closer look at this weld purely because a member reported smoke / steam coming from this portion during his showroom visit in this post. Bit rough, but no issues noticed to my eyes atleast.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_5971.jpg

Last edited by Samurai : 7th December 2018 at 15:03. Reason: typo fixed
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Old 6th December 2018, 09:19   #9
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Default Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650

Please note that the below is just the opinion of a normal user who, thankfully, had the opportunity to ride most of the options in and around this price range. Apologies in advance for any shortcomings hence.

Ride Report - Interceptor 650

Starting with the most obvious question when it comes to Royal Enfields - vibrations! Interceptor had slight tingle on the tank while the GT had almost nothing to complain about (Note - The tank doesn't touch the thighs as much as in the Interceptor). Karthikeye Singhee has earlier made this viral with his 'chai cup challenge', and I was pleasantly surprised to feel this for myself. Its not just impressive for a Royal Enfield, it's impressive compared to the Japanese machines as well - and I would rate it at par with the Kawasaki 650s in this regard.

Job well done, RE - they claim to have used a counterbalanced crankshaft and it shows in the results too!

The second most obvious question when it comes to an RE? Sound. Again, with hundreds of videos on the web describing this now, it didnt make sense to record it - but one suprising aspect to me was the volume from the exhausts when accelerating, it is not as quiet as it seems at idle, and certainly not as characterless like other parallel twin 650s, specially thanks to the 270 degree firing order. The rumble is very easily identifiable as a twin and people do tend to notice something different about this Enfield when parked side by side at signals.

Is it as loud as a typical Bullet lover would want it? No, and thankfully - if I may add. A very loud exhaust can get very annoying on a long tour - and I feel this one hits a good balance somewhere in between.

The next big question - Power? Both the motorcycles are powered by a 648cc parallel twin engine delivering 47hp@7250rpm and 58Nm of torque @5250rpm. While these figures might seem average intially, I believe it's enough power for this format of motorcycle. The vehicle picks up pace neat and clean. It certainly doesn't have the low end torque of a Bullet 500, but what you get is a very linear wave of torque with no real surpises all the way till near the redline. Fuelling feels spot on as well, specially there is no throttle jerk felt in most modern bikes upon the initial opening of the throttle - a signature trait in many present generations bikes that are designed to meet the tough Euro emission norms.

Dyno report on youtube video showed something similar - 44HP at the wheels, unfortunately it has been removed now.


100 kmph comes up at a healthy 5000rpm, in fifth gear - and then you realize there is another gear left! For the 6th gear, 100kmph comes up at 4500rpm - at which point it is smooth sailing that can be done all day long! Issue with traditional Enfields have been its ability to cruise on the modern 4-lane highways and expressways - not anymore. 120kmph can be done all day as well, and the Interceptor 650 brings it up at around 5300rpm. Normally that should sound alarming on a Royal Enfield, but on the Interceptor - it is pretty relaxed, the engine developing its peak torque and with a lot more grunt left before the peak power is achieved and almost no real vibrations to speak of - except a tingling sensation from the tank if you are hugging it closely.

Yes it is possible to hit the redline of 7500 in most gears - and you get a mild bounce off when you hit this range.

100 kmph comes up at a healthy 5000rpm, in fifth gear - and then you realize there is another gear left!

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-2016_0211_185048_034_1600.jpg

For the 6th gear, 100kmph comes up at 4500rpm - at which point it is smooth sailing that can be done all day long!

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-2016_0211_185442_112_1600.jpg

And also deliver some fun at times. An RE that can hit the redline when the rider is in the mood for some quick take-offs!

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-2016_0211_185812_182_1600.jpg

Issue with traditional Enfields have been its ability to cruise on the modern 4-lane highways and expressways - not anymore. 120kmph can be done all day as well, and the Interceptor 650 brings it up at around 5300rpm. Normally that should sound alarming on a Royal Enfield, but on the Interceptor - it is pretty relaxed, with lot more grunt left and almost no real vibrations to speak of - except a tingling sensation from the tank if you are hugging it closely.


Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-2016_0211_185503_119_1600.jpg

Straight line stability - The reason I mentioned that the power is enough for this format of motorcycle. The motorcycle is really good below 120kmph and as long as you stick below these speeds (only on modern expressways), there should be no concern at all

However, there are a couple of issues I had noticed during the ride - 1. The vehicle had a slight tendency to side track when rolling over the white lane markers on the road and 2. The budget suspension raises its head when the road gets a bit bumpy (and at highway speeds), the rear being sprung a bit soft and the front stiff.

Things get a bit unnerving above these speeds, which are anyways not recommended even on modern highways. One major concern (Other than the slight floaty feeling from the suspension mentioned above) was cross winds which seriously had an effect as the speeds increased above highway limits.

Note -

Note that I'm comparing it to the high standards set by the existing 650s like the Ninja, Versys, VStrom or CBR in this regard (which some might also argue is not a fair thing considering the pricing difference) - so the above might not be the same experience for someone upgrading from a lower segment, especially one of the earlier Enfields. Even the Duke 390 has a similar lightness at these speeds - the Interceptor might actually be a bit better off.

The vehicle had a slight, yet noticeable tendency to side track when rolling over the white lane markers on the road

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-2016_0211_185533_129_1600.jpg

Windblasts - Can't judge it fair because the motorcycle came with the (longer version of the ) accessory bikini fairing - and it did a fairly decent job. Not perfect and there was a slight draft of air hitting the helmet still, but at no point did it feel it a wrestle against the wind as it happens with most nakeds.

Picture of both the accessory fairings provided separately below.

Clutch and gearshift - BUTTER!

Probably the biggest surprise regarding the 650 twins, and the one factor other than price and NVH that I would rate extremely high. The bike features the first slip and assist clutch seen on a Royal Enfield along with their first six speed gearbox and both are as good as it gets. Coming down the gears rapidly, it reminded me of the new Duke 390 - and that's saying something for an RE.

Gear ratios are well spaced and never felt out of place, although I wonder why the 6th gear was not made slightly taller. 100kmph comes up at 4500rpm, which feels slightly higher - however compensated by the smooth vibe free engine. The good part is that you are in the meat of the torque band between 100 - 120 kmph with a lot more grunt left before the peak power is achieved and this translates to effortless overtaking on the highways.

The smooth parallel twin engine + slipper clutch + smooth 6 speed gearbox combination makes this an RE that is actually fun to rush through the gears.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-2016_0211_185754_176_1600.jpg

Seating posture - Not as relaxed as a Bullet, but just as any other modern retro classic would feel. There is a slight forward bias, though not enough to complain about the weight being felt on the wrists - but I can imagine handlebar risers being a popular aftermarket accessory in the near future, specially with those upgrading from existing Enfields - Could overhear some discussions regarding seating posture in the showrooms. The seating posture reminded me a bit of the Dominar 400.

That means the legs are a bit backward set as well, as explained in the pics above - once again not a deal breaker, but something that you should notice during the test ride. Many people seem to have complaints regarding the footpeg position - that it interferes when you place the feet on the ground, however - I did not face this issue. My height is 5'11 for reference (Please refer to the picture in the earlier post).

Speaking of which, the ride height is pretty less at 804mm and should be usable to a good majority of Indian riders.

Brakes - Felt decent and infact I really didn't notice it much on the Interceptor except during a hurried stop required towards the end of the TR, which is good since I'm used to the excellent brakes on the Versys. Dual channel ABS comes standard as well.

One thing I did notice was the rear brake, that it does have a bit of stopping power compared to most superbikes. Good to use along with the front, and what also helps is the slip and assist clutch - allowing you to rush down through the gears without needing to play havoc with the rear wheel.

Weight?

Honestly, I wouldn't be the best person to judge the weight as the Interceptor 650 feels light and nimble compared to my 650.

But then it does resemble something like a Ninja 650 and I guess thats not really a bad thing for the segment. If you compare with a Duke 390, yes - this one will be very heavy in comparison. This is a 650cc twin afterall and because of the pricing (and the performance too, I agree) - doesn't make sense comparing the weight against a 373cc single designed to be a light pocket rocket.

Suspension?

Not the best like I mentioned earlier, but except for the slight uneven tune between the front and rear (slightly stiff and the front and slightly soft at the rear) - there is not much else to complain below highway cruising speeds. Did not have many corners to speak about, so had to make use of U-turns and by-lanes to judge the balance and weight - and it felt like quite an easy going motorcycle at these speeds.

Would be it enjoyable on a mountain road? I think one click harder rear suspension should do the trick, but not very sure about the tyres. The vehicle had a slight tendency to side track when rolling over the white lane markers on the road, which makes me wonder if it could feel a bit nervous over road undulations, potholes and patchwork, mid - corner.

Ground clearance of 174mm was decent enough to clear whatever Bangalore speedbreakers I threw at the bike. Although I didn't get to ride the Interceptor with a pillion, I did ride the GT with a pillion and no GC issues were noticed (Note - But GT gets stiffer suspension preload at the rear). Also the same was observed by another customer who had taken the Interceptor out for a spin - with his wife and kid along as well.

Ground clearance of 174mm

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-2016_0211_185227_067_1600.jpg

Heat

Purposefully tried to fry my knees post the TD, by keeping the knee as close to the engine as the heat-guard would allow. A fast highway run might not be the best judge for heating abilities, so I checked out this parameter later in traffic with the identical CGT650 (see below post) - but this test was passed with flying colours. Nothing close to the twins from Harley (Street 750) or Ducati (Scrambler) in this regard, and thats a very good thing.

It will obviously feel a little hot, being a 650cc air and oil cooled twin afterall, but it doesn't really hurt or get very uncomfortable, and some smaller bikes like the Duke 390 heat up as much or even more. I guess the very understressed tune of just 9.5:1 compression ratio is helping here.

Purposefully trying to fry my knees post the TD.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-2016_0211_185933_209_1600.jpg

Handling


Feels decent and enjoyable although the bike doesn't feel quick to turn into the corners. I felt the seating posture makes it slightly difficult to lean into the corner and some rider effort is required to get a quick turn in - but otherwise a pretty stable motorcycle indeed.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6349b_1600.jpg

Did not have any major corners to speak about during all the initial TDs - so had to make use of U-turns and bylanes to judge the balance and weight. I didn't find anything major to complain about -

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-2016_0211_185748_174_1600.jpg

Tight U-turns shouldn't be too hard as well.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-2016_0101_083218_134_1600.jpg

Had to ride in slightly wet conditions while heading to the photoshoot location. Tyres felt decent enough - though to be fair, I wasn't pushing the motorcycle hard either - roads were bound to be slippery as rains were not common this season and it didn't rain hard enough either. ABS is a reassurance in such conditions.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-2018_0101_054920_331_1600.jpg

Interceptor 650 in its element -

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-2018_0101_075848_431_1600.jpg

Last edited by Jaggu : 6th December 2018 at 18:04. Reason: Removing the broken youtube link and editing the line. Thanks
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Old 6th December 2018, 09:31   #10
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Default Ridden: Continental GT 650 Twin

Please note that the below is just the opinion of a normal user who, thankfully, had the opportunity to ride most of the options in and around this price range. Apologies in advance for any shortcomings hence.

Ride Report - Continental GT650 Twin

Note - To avoid repetition, I'll try to avoid points that are exactly the same as the Interceptor 650.


Starting with the most obvious question when it comes to Royal Enfields - vibrations! GT had almost nothing to complain about, not even the slight tingle felt on the tank of the Interceptor 650 - possibly because the tank was slimmer and less in contact with the thighs.

Upwards of 6000rpm! That should sound alarming on a Royal Enfield, but the 650 twins can be taken all the way to the redline without shaking anything loose.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-2016_0211_192510_111_1600.jpg

The second most obvious question when it comes to an RE? Sound. No differences noticed with respect to the Interceptor 650, so the same observations as above.

The next big question - Power? Once again, similar observations as with the Interceptor 650.

Straight line stability - The reason I mentioned that the power is enough for this format of motorcycle. The motorcycle is really good below 120kmph and as long as you stick to these speeds (which are excellent for modern expressways), there should be no concern at all

However, there are a couple of issues I had noticed during the ride - 1. The vehicle had a slight tendency to side track when rolling over the white lane markers on the road and 2. The budget suspension raises its head when the road gets a bit bumpy, however two primary differences felt between the CGT650 and the Interceptor 650 though - one being the additional weight towards the front and resultant feedback from the clip-ons, the second being the slightly stiffer rear suspension making the bike feel tighter. Infact, inspite of not being very much used to riding bikes with a forward biased clip-on stance, found the CGT to be nimble enough for traffic and a bit more fun to switch lanes and overtake too.

Things get a bit unnerving above these speeds, which are anyways not recommended even on modern highways. One major concern (Other than the slight floaty feeling from the suspension mentioned above) was cross winds which seriously had an effect as the speeds increased above highway limits. It's here that i felt the CGT650 being a bit more of a worry, probably the additional feedback from the front not helping the case here.

Despite the clip-ons and the forward biased stance of the CGT650, it felt nimble enough managing through traffic - especially by mid capacity, twin cylinder bike standards.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-2016_0211_192152_045_1600.jpg

Windblasts - Can't judge it fair because the motorcycle came with the (shorter version of the ) accessory bikini fairing - and it did a fairly decent job. Not perfect and there was a slight draft of air hitting the helmet still, but at no point did it feel it a wrestle against the wind.

Picture of both the accessory fairings provided separately below - and I think the shorter version does fine for the CGT thanks to the leaned forward stance, or one can always opt for the longer one too.

Clutch and gearshift - Confused!

Probably the biggest surprise regarding the Interceptor 650, and this is one area I was a bit disappointed with the CGT. Now not sure if it's an issue with the particular motorcycle, or whether the different lever mounts are at play - but I hit neutral twice between first and second, and one false neutral once somewhere between 2nd and 3rd. Clutch was as smooth as the Interceptor, so not sure why this behaviour. Same opinion was also echoed by the next person who took TD as well. However, the second CGT650 test ride vehicle at a different dealership didn't have this issue, though it also did not feel as butter smooth as the Interceptor 650.

Gear ratios are well spaced and never felt out of place, although I wonder why the 6th gear was not made slightly taller. 100kmph comes up at 4500rpm, which feels slightly higher - however compensated by the smooth vibe free engine. The good part is that you are in the meat of the torque band between 100 - 120 kmph and this translates to effortless overtaking on the highways.


Seating posture
- Aggressive. Period. There is a definite forward bias, though the good part is that the rear set footpegs feel all natural in this posture.

Mirrors on the Interceptor 650 was just about useful, whereas the ones on the CGT was way off, not happy as I kept adjusting during TD, but finally left it. Royal Enfield offers various optional RVMs for touring, bar-end mirrors etc - which might be an option worth looking into - for looks and functionality.

Wrong vehicle to have taken for testing out Bangalore traffic? My arms sure think so! Seasoned sportbike riders will say that you need to take pressure of the wrists by locking the tank with your knees, and using the core strength to free up the arms - which was something I tried during the highway ride and didn't feel as much displeasure as this time around - although still I had two issues - 1. Tank is slim compared to the bike and 2. The knee recess for the tank seems to have been designed with shorter riders in mind, and my knee was hitting exactly where it ends, not a pleasant experience with jeans. However, things were different this time around as I had a pillion - the sales rep who decided to join in on the fun. He knew how to sit pillion on sport bikes and didn't put much pressure on my back - but the difference in space available on the seat, plus the slight extra weight of the pillion was enough to make a lot of difference in comfort levels, atleast for me.

Wrong vehicle to have taken for testing out Bangalore traffic? My arms sure think so!


Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-2018_1201_121530_296_1600.jpg

Seasoned sportbike riders will say that you need to take pressure of the wrists, but I had my concerns on this, especially with a pillion.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-2018_1201_120127_015_1600.jpg

Mirrors on the CGT was way off, not happy as I kept adjusting during TD, but finally left it

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-2016_0211_192237_060_1600.jpg

Brakes - No differences noticed with respect to the Interceptor 650, so the same observations as above.

Weight?

Similar observations as with the Interceptor 650.

Suspension and handling?

Feels tighter than the Interceptor 650 and there is not much else to complain below highway cruising speeds. Did not have many corners to speak about, so had to make use of U-turns and by-lanes to judge the balance and weight - and it felt like quite an easy going motorcycle at these speeds. Clip-ons and the stance does make it feel like it can be enjoyed into a corner.

Would be it enjoyable on a mountain road? I feel yes, but not very sure about the tyres. The vehicle had a slight tendency to side track when rolling over the white lane markers on the road, which makes me wonder if it could feel a bit nervous over road undulations, potholes and patchwork, mid - corner. On smooth roads however, it is easier to turn into a corner as compared to the Interceptor 650 thanks to the riding posture and once in, it keeps the line stable as well.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6328b_1600.jpg

Heat

RE air and oil cooled 650cc engine against Bangalore traffic. Bangaloreans can attest to the fact that this part of ORR is now a mess thanks to the white topping activities going on. Was looking for excess heat from the engine, and although the big engine was surely making its presence felt - it was not uncomfortable at any point.

RE air and oil cooled 650cc engine against Bangalore traffic.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-2018_1201_121257_245_1600.jpg

Tested in a typical Bangalore traffic jam that lasted for about a kilometer. Of course, its December and Bangalore climate was showing a pleasant 28 degree celcius - so things might feel very different when tested during a Chennai / Delhi summer, for example.

Tested in a typical Bangalore traffic jam that lasted for about a kilometer.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-2018_1201_121306_248_1600.jpg
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Old 6th December 2018, 09:38   #11
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Default Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin

Accessories -

Some of the common accessories for the 650 twins as spotted in the showrooms -

Large flyscreen for the Interceptor 650 -

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_20181130_114224.jpg

Smaller flyscreen for the Continental GT 650 -

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_20181130_112144.jpg

Large Engine Guard -

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_20181130_112202.jpg

Same is available in black -

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-whatsapp-image-20181116-09.59.04.jpeg

Small Engine Guard, the same is available in black too.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_20181130_114230_1600.jpg

Single rider's seat on the Continental GT 650 for the cafe racer look -

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_20181130_114317.jpg

Brake fluid reservoir cap -

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_20181130_112136.jpg
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Old 6th December 2018, 09:56   #12
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Default Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin

Other points -
  • Good dealership experiences overall with RE dealerships that I visited.
  • Big thanks to SSS Motors, Peenya especially Puneeth and Rakesh for all their help in arranging the bike for the photoshoot. Bikes like the 650 twins are only half the part when converting a brand like RE into a premium player, the rest half is played by enthusiastic guys like Puneeth who interact with customers. This is the unearthly hour at which he came to the showroom as per my request to allow for an early morning shoot of the bikes.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_20181205_060057.jpg
  • Thanks to Acclaim Motors, Yelahanka for the detailed highway test rides - specially Gagan and Bharath. Almost all the staff there were extremely excited with the new product and their excitement was showing in the way they treated customers too - be it with detailed test rides, gathering feedback etc.
  • Also thanks to CVS Motors @ Kalyan Nagar, Sai Ram Autocraft @Mahadevapura and RE showroom@ Indira Nagar for their test rides.
  • Had many good discussions with prospective walk-in customers at most of these showrooms -
  1. The second day of launch, met an elderly gentleman who had walked in along with his wife. He was considering the Street Twin but now finding it difficult to pay 3 times the OTR for the same.
  2. During the first day of test rides, met a biker in his early 30s who had actually booked the Interceptor 650 at 10:30pm on launch day. He owns a Z900 as primary bike and wanted one more addition for commutes + easy going smaller rides.
  3. Met a Triumph T120 customer (Did not speak to him directly though) who was speaking to the same SA at one showroom. Again, secondary bike. Funnily enough - RE guys were asking him how much cc and what price - and got a shock when they heard it.
  4. Met a walk in customer - a gentleman in his 40s, who actually saw me taking the TD and walked half a kilometer to the showroom to find out more about the bike. He questioned me a lot on the ride experience and the vehicle specs and seems to have been quite surprised with the price - Went back deciding himself that he will wait for the issues in initial deliveries to get reported and then pick up one for himself.
  • Showroom staff expect the service costs to be around 2000 per service.
  • First service is at 500kms, post which a 10,000 kms service interval needs to be followed.
  • Technicians who performed the first service are happy that this new 650 architecture is much simpler to service as compared to the old 500 / 350 ones - like the oil filter for example.
  • Current bookings are being promised delivery only in April. Not surprised seeing the amount of bookings happening at the showrooms.
  • A look at the most popular 'Orange Crush' colour option in real -
Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-20181201_111503_hdr2.jpg
  • Queue at a showroom waiting for test rides - Both the TD bikes were constantly in use by customers, the Interceptor especially so.
Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_20181201_1216482.jpg
  • Showroom guys were asking customers their feedback on a detailed online RE feedback form, that took a couple of minutes to complete. Questions ranged from smoothness, clutch and gearshifts to handing and price.
  • Contents of the stock tool kit provided -
Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6264_1600.jpg
  • Underneath the silencer, you can find the stamping that these Enfields adhere to the EPA Emission and sound norms. Produces less than 80dB. I believe a lot of owners will be looking forward to the launch of S&S aftermarket silencers, as showcased by RE earlier.
Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_6297_800.jpg

Last edited by CrAzY dRiVeR : 6th December 2018 at 10:46.
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Old 6th December 2018, 12:55   #13
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Default Re: Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin

Thread moved from the Assembly Line to the Big Bikes Section. Thanks for sharing, CrAzY dRiVeR! This is like an Official Review .
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Old 6th December 2018, 13:27   #14
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Default Re: Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin

Quote:
Originally Posted by GTO View Post
Thanks for sharing, CrAzY dRiVeR! This is like an Official Review .
I thought it was one

Chetta, if you were in the market at this instance for a new bike, considering all your riding requirements remain the same - would you buy the interceptor as your one do-it-all bike?
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Old 6th December 2018, 13:54   #15
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@CrAzY dRiVeR : Thank you for the detailed pictures and the brilliant write up!

The only two things that bothered me from my first inspection of the bike at the showroom (and probably require a second look) are:


1. The exposed bit for wiring on the sensors on the exhaust (pic below).
2. The ECU beneath the seat


I wonder how they hold up against a regular wash, and the elements in general...
Attached Images
 

Last edited by GTO : 6th December 2018 at 15:03. Reason: Only Crazy Driver, removing my name :)
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