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Old 16th January 2023, 16:40   #106
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Re: Suzuki Gixxer SF 250 Ownership Review

Amazing. Track days are a different fun altogether. Krishna should have brought his R1, it should have been a different kinda monstrosity on the track. But it's good to always hone one's skills on a smaller bike then progressively up the ladder. Maybe neil, if you could trickle down a few points/handy tips shared by the coaches, an apples to oranges comparison perhaps that makes Indimotard and RACR unique in their teaching approach. Would humbly appreciate that.

Cheers!
VJ
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Old 25th January 2023, 23:52   #107
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Re: Suzuki Gixxer SF 250 Ownership Review

Quote:
Originally Posted by VijayAnand1 View Post
Amazing. Track days are a different fun altogether. Krishna should have brought his R1, it should have been a different kinda monstrosity on the track. But it's good to always hone one's skills on a smaller bike then progressively up the ladder. Maybe neil, if you could trickle down a few points/handy tips shared by the coaches, an apples to oranges comparison perhaps that makes Indimotard and RACR unique in their teaching approach. Would humbly appreciate that.

Cheers!
VJ
VijayAnand1, my experiences with Indimotard and RACR are a few years apart from each other. Hence, I might be off on a few points. To the best of my recollection, both Indimotard and RACR teach the same concepts and practice the same drills, for their entry level programs.

Over days 1 and 2, the sessions alternate between theory and on track riding. The sequence is roughly,
- being taught the basics (theory)
- familiarizing yourself with the track
- riding on track with only one gear and no brakes (throttle control 101)
- riding on track with only two gears and no brakes
- braking drills (practice in the pits)
- counter steering (practice in the pits)
- all the above + body positioning
- riding on track with all gears, brakes and body positioning

Irrespective of whether you go with Indimotard or RACR, by the end of day 2, you are guaranteed to become a smoother, faster rider, than you were, before you started the course.

In terms of differences between Indimotard or RACR, my observations are below
- Indimotard's trainers include Anand Dharmaraj, Shumi, TBHPian Vignesh and Daniel Anandraj. All are veteran riders and coaches. RACR's trainers are national level racers including Rajini, and young riders like Ullas S, Lani Zena, Rajiv Sethu etc.
- Indimotard takes a theory heavy approach from the start, and follows it up it with on track riding. RACR takes a more hands on and practice oriented approach to learning.
- Indimotard's approach may be more suited to road riding and racing, while RACR's approach may be more suited to racing. I say this based on my recollection that Indimotard encourages a stronger engine braking style, while RACR encourages a more brake oriented style.
- Indimotard doesnt / may not offer rentals on suits, boots and gloves (do check up on this) while RACR does. Having rentals works to keep entry costs low and allows young riders / first timers, to experience track riding.
- Indimotard offers the facility of bike transportation from Bangalore, while RACR doesnt (at least, not to my knowledge).
- Indimotard's fees are definitely higher than that of RACR.

I learnt and unlearnt, a lot from attending the level 1 sessions in both Indimotard and RACR. It is impossible to clearly state that either school is better than the other, for every type of student. Each school has their own strengths. Pick which suits your learning style and budget.

Suzuki Gixxer SF 250 Ownership Review-_hdr8991-large.jpg
O.T - Just 1 official photograph of my bike from the entire weekend! 10/10 for hitting the marker. My coach would be proud!


The perception in the motorcycling enthusiast community is that going for these track riding sessions is either
a. only for the well heeled
b. only for track nuts
c. only for the well heeled track nuts

Nothing could be further from the truth. Yes, track riding isnt cheap. But I believe that the benefits far outweigh the total financial outlay. These theory and practical lessons do translate into real world benefits. For example, when I am riding in the twisties, I actually manage to ride solely on the basis of throttle control and engine braking. I dont use the brakes, unless absolutely necessary. All this, while keeping up with the other riders (if Im in a group ride) or maintaining a fair clip, if Im riding alone.

On more than one occassion, the rider behind me has told me at a tea stop that the brake lights on my bike arent working. They get astounded when I show them that the brake lights work perfectly fine. Its just that I dont use them in the twisties. This is a skill that I have learned from my sessions on the track, and I have taken it out into the real world. Needless to say, please dont try this if you dont know what you are doing!

In addition to this, I have vastly improved my vision, reflexes, braking anticipation, braking and so on, from the hours spent slowly practicing what I have learnt in these sessions. It doesnt matter whether you ride a mothership or an adventure bike or a faired sports bike or a cruiser. The lessons from the track will carry over into the real world riding.

P.S - Im one of those guys who advised our friend to not bring his R1 as it would have been too much for the track, for the first session. That said, I have a feeling that Ill be seeing it at Kari, sometime in the not too distant future!

P.P.S - If you want to see what California Superbike School (widely considered the gold standard in track training) teaches in Level 3, do check out the following video. I found the footage to be quite informative.

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Old 26th January 2023, 02:17   #108
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Re: Suzuki Gixxer SF 250 Ownership Review

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Originally Posted by Passatman View Post
I have some pics of the high visor and mask . Will post
Hello, sorry to go off topic but can you give me the details about the helmet and how to procure it? Thanks in advance.
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Old 26th January 2023, 08:55   #109
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Re: Suzuki Gixxer SF 250 Ownership Review

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Originally Posted by A5H15H View Post
Hello, sorry to go off topic but can you give me the details about the helmet and how to procure it? Thanks in advance.
Hi Ashish! The MotoGP helmet was sold by Suzuki with the bike earlier! I learnt it's no more available, though a similar motocross helmet is available. You could try if some dealers have leftover stocks. Good. Luck and happy riding
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Old 27th January 2023, 15:29   #110
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Ride Updates

Here are a couple of ride updates, from the past few weekends.

1. Ride to Andhakaranazhi Beach
Here are a couple of pictures from our ride to the beach. The coastal road has started to slowly deteriorate. This obviously didnt bother the Tiger, but it did keep my bike on its toes.

Suzuki Gixxer SF 250 Ownership Review-whatsapp-image-20230116-11.36.21-pm-1.jpeg
At our usual picture stop

Suzuki Gixxer SF 250 Ownership Review-whatsapp-image-20230116-11.36.20-pm-1.jpeg
The Tiger 800 dwarfs the little GSXRRR250!


2. Ride to Kodanad Elephant Training Center
Situated just 50 kilometers from Cochin, this offers a butterfly park, deer enclosures and the opportunity to see elephants from fairly close quarters. Getting to watch an elephant enjoying its Sunday morning bath, was a real treat. Be prepared for a long walk. The experience is completely worth it. The entry gate opens at 8 AM. This is a nice place for a family outing.

Suzuki Gixxer SF 250 Ownership Review-whatsapp-image-20230123-9.16.28-am.jpeg

Suzuki Gixxer SF 250 Ownership Review-whatsapp-image-20230123-9.16.22-am.jpeg

Suzuki Gixxer SF 250 Ownership Review-whatsapp-image-20230123-9.16.11-am.jpeg

Suzuki Gixxer SF 250 Ownership Review-whatsapp-image-20230123-9.16.40-am.jpeg
Hey, who shrunk my motorcycle?

The overall mileage since day 1 stands at 35.91 kmpl. In my next update, I will share details on the 3rd service, which was completed when the odometer was at 8,314 kilometers.
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Old 30th January 2023, 14:37   #111
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Third service experience

The first service of the Suzuki Gixxer SF 250 was completed in July 2022. The second service of the Suzuki Gixxer SF 250 was completed in September 2022. The third service was scheduled for the 10th of February / the odometer reading of 9,500 to 10,000 kilometers. I decided to get the service completed a few weeks earlier, than required.

This time, instead of Aluva Suzuki, I went to the Suzuki superbike showroom in Vytilla, to get a first hand experience of things. As compared to Aluva Suzuki, things move a lot slower here. That said, the quality of work, was good. The air filter was dusty, even after it was cleaned. After getting my approval, the mechanic replaced the air filter.

Suzuki Gixxer SF 250 Ownership Review-20230124_130430.jpg
The air filter which was replaced

Besides that, I asked for the preload levels on the rear suspension, to be stiffened up. It was on level 5 of 7, with 7 being the stiffest. For regular riding and touring purposes, the suspension was well setup for my weight. However, on the track, it was a little too excitable, for my liking. It is now set to level 7 of 7. There is a noticeable firmness at the rear, which is marginally at odds with the forgiving front end suspension. I need to check the sag levels on the bike. The front end just might need 41mm preload adjusters, to be installed, to balance out the rear.

Anyways, the overall bill was Rs 1,142. The service team was unable to generate the final bill, as the motorcycle is still tagged to the warranty claim, in Suzuki's systems.

Overall, the first service cost Rs 814. The second service cost Rs 936 (slight increase in spares cost). The third service cost Rs 1,142 (including the air filter change). Lets just say that Im loving the wallet friendly service costs associated with the GSXRRRRR250.

Suzuki Gixxer SF 250 Ownership Review-20230122_075653.jpg
One of these is a real menace on Kochi's roads ....
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Old 3rd February 2023, 18:37   #112
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A brief flirtation

From the time that I decided to get myself a smaller capacity motorcycle for touring, my friends asked me to keep an eye out for a low run but mint condition Honda CBR 250R. All of them claimed that it was a motorcycle that seemed to be built for my exact use case. As most of you will know, finding a CBR250, with that caveat, is almost impossible. All roads then led to the Suzuki showrooms and 6 months later, Ive had a topsy turvy ownership experience with my Suzuki Gixxer SF 250.

Out of the blue, a friend's TN 37 registered Honda CBR 250R came up for sale. The bike was in Cochin and had run less than 34,000 kilometers. Best of all, it came in Honda's stunning Repsol livery. The moment I got to know about the availability of the motorcycle, I went giddy with excitement. This was exactly the motorcycle that I was looking for, right?

Suzuki Gixxer SF 250 Ownership Review-whatsapp-image-20230129-2.33.50-pm.jpeg

For anyone interested in a high level comparison of the two motorcycles
  • The handlebar setup on the Honda CBR 250R is narrow and high. The handlebar setup on the Suzuki Gixxer SF 250 is much wider and lower. With the Suzuki, you dont get any pressure on your wrists.
  • The footpegs on the Honda are quite high. The footpegs on the Suzuki are much lower. Overall, the ergonomics of the Suzuki are much more comfortable, for someone of my height.
  • The engine on the Honda has an unexciting low end but packs a punchy mid-range. Hence, you think that you are doing 90 kmph, whereas you are actually doing 75 kmph. The Suzuki powertrain offers a very linear power delivery. Hence, you think that you are doing 75 kmph, whereas you are actually doing 90 kmph.
  • The brakes on both bikes could be better. That said, the braking setup on the Honda probably edges out that of the Suzuki, by a tiny margin.
  • The Honda engine wasnt as perfectly smooth, as what I thought it would be. There were vibrations around the 5,000 mark in the 3rd, 4th and 5th gear. However, the moment I slotted the gearbox into 6th, everything became butter smooth. This is the famed Honda refinement, that I have heard so much about! The Suzuki engine (post warranty replacement) is really smooth below 5,000 RPM and then vibrations seep in.
  • The Honda offers a nice windscreen which does a good job of deflecting air off your torso. The windscreen on the Suzuki is only for getting Instagram likes.
  • The rebound on the rear suspension on the Honda did throw my off my seat (in fairness, it wasnt set for a rider of my weight). The Suzuki's suspension is a lot more forgiving, in comparison.
  • Since its a global model, you get a ton of aftermarket parts, across all price brackets, for the Honda. The Suzuki doesnt have even 5% of the aftermarket parts, in comparison.
  • The longevity of the Honda engine is without a doubt. Its like a fine wine that ages gracefully. The short term refinement of the Suzuki engine itself is suspect. God know what it will be like with 1,00,000 kilometers of riding across Indian roads!

Suzuki Gixxer SF 250 Ownership Review-20230126_181111.jpg
The difference in the handlebars

Suzuki Gixxer SF 250 Ownership Review-20230126_181123.jpg
The difference in the footpeg heights

Suzuki Gixxer SF 250 Ownership Review-20230126_181135.jpg
The difference in the combined ergonomics

Thankfully, my friend trusted me enough to lend me the bike for a few days, so that I could see whether the CBR 250R suited my requirements. On paper, it was perfect. I even did a short Sunday morning ride with my usual riding partner, who was on his famous red Tiger 800. Sadly, I just couldnt come to terms with the ergonomics on the brilliant Honda CBR 250R. The riding position simply put too much pressure on my wrists and wasnt spacious enough for someone of my height and broad-ish frame. With a heavy heart, I handed the keys of the lovely Repsol edition CBR 250R, back to my friend, and collected my Suzuki GSXRRR 250. For now, Im helping him find the right buyer for his CBR 250R. Too bad it couldnt be me!

Suzuki Gixxer SF 250 Ownership Review-whatsapp-image-20230129-2.33.47-pm.jpeg

Suzuki Gixxer SF 250 Ownership Review-whatsapp-image-20230129-2.33.48-pm.jpeg
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Old 3rd February 2023, 23:43   #113
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Re: Suzuki Gixxer SF 250 Ownership Review

Track days are always different than the actual roads. You don't see an animal crossing or a pedestrian all of a sudden on track. Tracks are well cleaned, paved properly and you can rely on the corners. But no roads in India can match a track. Engine braking has its both positive and negative. It is the reason no track run engine will be given a warranty and it has lesser life. Yes all those said a track is the place to learn if given a chance. You learn a lot of basics to perfection which comes from the back of the mind which helps you in crucial situations. Counter steering and certain other techniques can never be learnt by a road only user and a lot more. Keep the great learning for best use!
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Old 5th February 2023, 09:16   #114
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Re: Suzuki Gixxer SF 250 Ownership Review

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Quote:
Originally Posted by neil.jericho View Post
VijayAnand1, my experiences with Indimotard and RACR are a few years apart from each other. Hence, I might be off on a few points. To the best of my recollection, both Indimotard and RACR teach the same concepts and practice the same drills, for their entry level programs.

In terms of differences between Indimotard or RACR, my observations are below
- Indimotard's trainers include Anand Dharmaraj, Shumi, TBHPian Vignesh and Daniel Anandraj. All are veteran riders and coaches. RACR's trainers are national level racers including Rajini, and young riders like Ullas S, Lani Zena, Rajiv Sethu etc.
- Indimotard takes a theory heavy approach from the start, and follows it up it with on track riding. RACR takes a more hands on and practice oriented approach to learning.
- Indimotard's approach may be more suited to road riding and racing, while RACR's approach may be more suited to racing. I say this based on my recollection that Indimotard encourages a stronger engine braking style, while RACR encourages a more brake oriented style.
- Indimotard doesnt / may not offer rentals on suits, boots and gloves (do check up on this) while RACR does. Having rentals works to keep entry costs low and allows young riders / first timers, to experience track riding.
- Indimotard offers the facility of bike transportation from Bangalore, while RACR doesnt (at least, not to my knowledge).
- Indimotard's fees are definitely higher than that of RACR.

I learnt and unlearnt, a lot from attending the level 1 sessions in both Indimotard and RACR. It is impossible to clearly state that either school is better than the other, for every type of student. Each school has their own strengths. Pick which suits your learning style and budget.

The perception in the motorcycling enthusiast community is that going for these track riding sessions is either
a. only for the well heeled
b. only for track nuts
c. only for the well heeled track nuts
That sounds really fun! I have been riding an Apache 160 4V for over a year now and would love to try it out on the track My father made me attend driving school for bikes out of fear that I'd dive under a truck if not taught well. Though puns aside, I really am grateful that he forced my to learn through them as it made me a much better rider than majority of people in India (The ones who get unrestricted access to 2 wheelers since their teens and evolve into chappris )
I was looking out for tracks in Maharashtra to try out but unfortunately couldn't find one.. Where it this place you're talking about?

Last edited by Sheel : 5th February 2023 at 09:59. Reason: Mod note attached.
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Old 5th February 2023, 21:51   #115
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Re: Suzuki Gixxer SF 250 Ownership Review

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Originally Posted by HoldMaBeer View Post
I was looking out for tracks in Maharashtra to try out but unfortunately couldn't find one.. Where it this place you're talking about?
HoldMaBeer, there are 3 major tracks in India, where you can go to learn
- Kari motor speedway which is in Coimbatore
- Madras Motor Race Track (MMRT) which is in Madras
- Buddh International Circuit which is in Greater Noida

You can also look at getting training in places like Meco Kartopia in Bangalore. TBHPian deepfreak15 had attended a course there (Motorcycle Track day with CRA Motorsports - Meco Kartopia, Bengaluru).
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Old 8th February 2023, 10:18   #116
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Re: Suzuki Gixxer SF 250 Ownership Review

Quote:
Originally Posted by VijayAnand1 View Post
Amazing. Track days are a different fun altogether. Krishna should have brought his R1, it should have been a different kinda monstrosity on the track. But it's good to always hone one's skills on a smaller bike then progressively up the ladder. Maybe neil, if you could trickle down a few points/handy tips shared by the coaches, an apples to oranges comparison perhaps that makes Indimotard and RACR unique in their teaching approach. Would humbly appreciate that.
Quote:
Originally Posted by neil.jericho View Post
The perception in the motorcycling enthusiast community is that going for these track riding sessions is either
a. only for the well heeled
b. only for track nuts
c. only for the well heeled track nuts

Nothing could be further from the truth. Yes, track riding isnt cheap. But I believe that the benefits far outweigh the total financial outlay. These theory and practical lessons do translate into real world benefits.
VijayAnand1, I was chatting with a gentleman that I met at the RACR track weekend regarding the course and he shared his perspective on the matter. He is based out of Shillong. With his permission, I have posted the following paragraph. I hope this helps more enthusiasts understand why track riding courses can be helpful to riders of all ages and geographical locations.

My intention in joining was rather simple: I began biking in 2020(!) after more than two decades of driving. I have more than enough experience when it comes to four wheels but next to none on two wheels. The more I rode, the more I realized how little I knew about riding. I donít have the luxury of another 20+ years of biking to learn all that I need to know. Thus began my search for a systematized and formal training for two wheelers. I chose RACR because of their racing background. My logic was that if motorsport is the pinnacle of motor engineering then motor racing should be the same for riding. Also, our roads here resemble a racetrack than the typical expressways that can be found around the country. Hence, knowledge of lines, engine braking, throttle control, braking, counter steering etc are integral to our riding.
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Old 8th February 2023, 17:49   #117
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Re: Suzuki Gixxer SF 250 Ownership Review

Subtle! Track days change you as a person. As they say, the more you learn, the little you know, is a time and again proven pearl of wisdom. If anything I've learnt from my experience as a motorcyclist thus far (excluding a track day) is that track is a single variable, whereas street/conditions is a constantly changing variable. This is the thin line that inundates new track day folks with an experienced one. They want to do it all, in one go, whenever they ride. Unfortunately things don't work that way.

You need to be ADAPTABLE TO roads to become a better rider. Accelerating through the entire corner, adding more lean, as you speed up only really works in gentle bends, with near perfect visibility or in controlled environments like race tracks, when you know the nuance of the track. On streets you can crash following some of the track practices. The key to be a better rider is to blend "some" of the aspects of track riding to the conditions that are presented to you on hand while riding.

I always say, a good rider is one who adapts to the roads and makes peace with his pace. A bad rider makes the road accommodate to his pace, which is short-lived eventually. And as someone said, I live to ride another day!

Appreciate it Neil.

Cheers!
VJ
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Old 12th February 2023, 14:51   #118
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Front brake pad change - F Motors

A few days after the third service of the motorcycle, I dropped into the Suzuki SVC to pick up a spare part , as I planned to do a week long ride. When the service advisor heard that I was going for a 5 day ride, he proactively checked the front brake pads on the GSXRRR 250 and promptly told me that they would only last for another 1,000 - 1,500 kilometers. How they missed this crucial aspect, when I had given the bike for service, less than a week back, is beyond me!

The motorcycle had done only 8,300 kilometers at that point of time. Bear in mind that I'm a sedate rider and use a lot more engine braking, than most other riders. Despite that, the pads wouldn't have lasted for even 10,000 kilometers.

Since I had plans to eventually upgrade the front braking system (maybe changing the master cylinder to that of the Duke 390?), I thought it best to switch to non OEM but higher quality brake pads. From the time that I purchased the GSXRRRRR 250, my friends had suggested that I switch to ceramic brake pads from Versah. This was the perfect opportunity to switch over to better after market pads.

F Motors sourced and fitted the Versah brake pads for me. The MRP of the pads is Rs 1,300. As always, the service experience with F Motors was stellar. I continue to highly recommend F Motors for its excellent workmanship and attention to detail.

Now that the pads are scrubbed in, I can confirm that the bite from the front end has improved, as compared to the stock setup. The braking is clearly stronger and more reassuring, than before. That said, while it is an improvement, most enthusiasts will need a master cylinder upgrade to compliment the performance of the Versah ceramic pads.

For now, Im keen to see how long these Versah pads last, as compared to the stock pads.

Suzuki Gixxer SF 250 Ownership Review-20230203_154258.jpg
Disassembling the front brakes

Suzuki Gixxer SF 250 Ownership Review-20230203_153123.jpg
Versah ceramic pads

Suzuki Gixxer SF 250 Ownership Review-20230203_153133.jpg
Versah ceramic pads

Suzuki Gixxer SF 250 Ownership Review-20230201_155954.jpg
Old pads - side view

Suzuki Gixxer SF 250 Ownership Review-20230203_153416.jpg
New pads - side view

Suzuki Gixxer SF 250 Ownership Review-20230203_153748.jpg
Old pads - top view

Suzuki Gixxer SF 250 Ownership Review-20230203_153713.jpg
New pads - top view
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Old 22nd February 2023, 19:15   #119
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9,000 kilometers up

Quote:
A few days after the third service of the motorcycle, I dropped into the Suzuki SVC to pick up a spare part , as I planned to do a week long ride. When the service advisor heard that I was going for a 5 day ride, he proactively checked the front brake pads on the GSXRRR 250 and promptly told me that they would only last for another 1,000 - 1,500 kilometers. How they missed this crucial aspect, when I had given the bike for service, less than a week back, is beyond me!
When I took my bike for its 3rd service to the Suzuki superbike dealership, I expected a top notch experience. After all, this is the same team that works on all the Hayabusas and VStrom 650s in Kerala. I still havent gotten over how they serviced the bike without checking the brake pads. A few days ago, while I was on a ride, I suddenly found the dash showing an "OIL CHANGE" warning. The service advisor confirmed that they had forgotten to connect the Suzuki tool to the bike, to clear the automatic "OIL CHANGE" warning which gets triggered after the bike crosses a particular odometer reading. He asked me to bring the bike in, so that they can clear the warning from the dash. I'm beginning to wonder what else they might have forgotten during the service

Meanwhile, the motorcycle crossed 9,000 kilometers on this impromptu ride to the hills. Ill try to post about it, later today.

While on the ride, I just might have managed to decode the mystery behind the (in?)famous vibrations issue which plagues the Gixxer / SF 250. Let me do a few more rides to confirm my hypothesis.

Meanwhile, the Versah brake pads have bedded in nicely, over the last 700 odd kilometers. They are a noticeable improvement over the stock pads but it isnt a night and day difference.

The suspension being on the stiffest setting did help improve the handling in the twisties. Fresh out of the showroom, the stock setting of the rear preload was 5 (out of 7). That was good for touring and some spirited riding, but it fell short on the track. The rear preload was changed to the maximum of level 7, during the 3rd service. I should probably experiment with level 6, to see how it fares.

The mileage since day 1 stands at 35.75 kmpl.

Suzuki Gixxer SF 250 Ownership Review-20230221_160252.jpg
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Old 23rd February 2023, 15:31   #120
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Re: Suzuki Gixxer SF 250 Ownership Review

My ownership review of Gixxer SF 250 after 3 years/35000 kms

The background and initial impressions (posted on xbhp when I bought the bike):-
Buying experience:
On January 2019, I have decided to buy a motorcycle in the range 1.5 L to 1.85 L by March 2020. So that I have time to mobilize the required fund and I might get BS 4 stock clearance offer. With 2 years of knowledge gathering on bikes finalized Gixxer 250 (Gixxer SF 250 wasn't falling into my price range). By 07/02/2020, I had 1.7 L in hand and started enquiring about rates so that I shall buy by mid of March 2020. Almost all the dealers refused that Gixxer 250 will be available after BS 6 stock comes. One dealer said he can arrange one, but if I choose Gixxer SF 250 he will provide it at Rs. 1,70,000/-. And me excited, discussed with family and decided to buy immediately. I visited the showroom to see the condition of the bike and booked on that day itself. The next day went for taking delivery and did thorough PDI checks (Thanks to internet). After completing all the formalities by lunch I reached home with the bike. It was beautiful, the tiredness due to lack of previous day sleep vanished. While I was admiring the beauty of the vehicle in the parking lot,I noticed oil leak from engine head. I became furious and went back to showroom after completing the Friday prayers. The showroom guy seemed to be dissapointed and sorry and offered for a replacement if I am willing to take black colour or else he would repair the same vehicle under warranty. As I loved both the colours, I opted for the black one. Their main showroom was 50 kms from my place and they offered a brand new gixxer 150 to reach there (This is why the PDI is so damn important). I rode slowly considering that someone would buy it and finally took the delivery by 6 pm. After a few days, they gave me a studd helmet (worth around 1k) and suzuki seat cover.

Ownership experience:
As per the owner's manual, the following should be strictly followed for engine breaking in,
Upto 750 kms- <5000 Rpm
750 to 1600 kms- <7500 Rpm
After 1600 kms- <10000 Rpm
1st service @ 750-1000 kms
2nd service @ 4500-5000 kms
Further services at every 4500-5000 kms or 6 months whichever is earlier.
Rode the bike as instructed and reached 750 kms mark in a week, and by the tenth day completed 1000 kms and gave it for service. After service there wasnít any notable differences and took the bike for a long trip (600 kms up and down). During all this time followed the manual instructions. Currently after a month exactly completed 2600 kms. The following are my thoughts about the bike

Pros:
Engine: The engine feels so reliable. It is linearly torquey and powerful on almost all rev ranges. It feels absolutely smooth at 6000 rpm. Below that this a commuter and post that this is a sports bike.
Transmission: The gear box is the thing that amazed me most. The shifts are perfect. I would compare this to that of the R 15
Looks: Personally I feels that this is the best looking bike below 3 lakhs and it sure grabs some attention.
Mileage: I got 42 kmpl at 5000 rpm drive in highways. In mixed conditions i'm getting 35 kmpl. 38 kmpl can be achieved at 110 kmph crusing speed.
Versatility: Below 5k Rpm, this feels as a 150 cc and can be used in commuting and post 6k rpm this roars till the end.
Ergonomics: I am 5'7" I have the habit of sitting on to the edge of the seat. With that style my back is COMPLETELY upright. The ergonomics is comfy for both traffic and touring.
Cruising capability: Crusing at 110 kmph to 120 kmph is easy on this bike. 130 kmph can be reached without any fuss. 140 kmph is a sure thing but at this speed the motor is stressed. But during all these speeds, the bike was surprisingly planted.
Tyres: The tyres feels very sticky (but in online, there are negative reviews about MRF Rev Z C). Really I can feel the tyres hugging on to the road P.s. I am very new to cornering and comparing this with FZ 25 , R 15 V1/V2 stock tyres.
Head light: The head light offers enough spread and range
Heating: I rode continuously 150 kms at high revs (7000 to 9000 rpm) at 35 degree Celsius weather and during all that time I felt only once heat pushing towards my calf and that too was not disturbing (would be pleasant in winter)
Braking: The braking is perfect to my satisfaction (I donít know why there are negative reviews in you tube) and being a first user of ABS, it feels so confident.
Cons:
Pillion seat: The pillion seat is tall as that of R 15 V 2, and the comfort is not good too.
Engine at 4k to 5k Rpm: Most of the times, there is sharp vibration between these Rpms that travels all along the chassis up to the pillion seat. Also at this Rpm, sometimes the engine sounds differently (I donít know how to describe the sound)

Now, coming to my current views,

Pros,
Looks: This may be subjective, but I love the looks. The side and rear are marvelously designed. It do attract attention.
Engine: This might be highly debated, particularly among those who suffer severe vibration. But, this engine is highly versatile. Be it commuting, touring, spirited riding it can do all albeit master of none. Not even a single moment during my tenure, I felt bad about this engine. Too early to say, but i feel this can last long as well.
Middleclass-esque: This bike can do commuting, spirited ridding, touring and what not!(except off roading). And the service interval is once in 5k kms/6 months, each costing maximum of 2-2.5k. The stock MRF lasts way long (32k- front, Rear still on and seems it can touch 40k easily). Considering all these isnt this perfect for the people who wants everything with their limited money?
Suzuki-response: The one boon which I got is the GM of bangalore region who is very helpful. He helped on multiple occasion to get the issues resolved promptly. Also, the complaints registered in suzuki portal are considered.
Gixxer club: The gixxer club in bangalore is very good. The group is active, helpful and fun. Decent amount of rides are organised now and then.

Cons,
Service centers: This being sold only in premium showrooms, if one were to live/move to rural side it will be an absolute disaster. From my hometown, the nearest ASC is 100kms away!!
Japanese reliability? Really? : In 2017, being an 125 cc owner, till then I haven't ridden any sporty motorcyle. The only big bike which I rode was bullet 350. Then I had an opportunity to have R25 V2(65k on odo) with me for 5 days. And 5 days later my entire perception about motorcycle changed, ENTIRELY!!! So that's what revving is!! i finally experienced it. Me being a fan among the crowd of RE, turned into a hate towards RE. Partly, because i found the real nature of my liking and partly due to the refinement! TBH, from that moment my interest towards motorcycle grew multifolds.
Now, coming to the topic- I was so sure that I was going to buy a japanese motorcycle only. The reason being reliability and refinement. Even I ditched Dominar 400 UG (in 2020, the diff in price was just 30k). The engine is definitely smooth but not as like that of yamaha and honda (better than bajaj and TVS). But i was left stranded on road on 3 occasions- 1. Some coil went off that was replaced under warranty, 2. Sensor was misplaced after service, 3. Battery died almost suddenly after 9 months of changing the battery.
Fit and finish: This needs a slight improvement, as they started to make noise. Particlarly the official seat cover, that squeaks everytime we get on to the bike.

To suzuki,
1. The product needs to be improved overall, I hope they already doing that aggresively as vstrom250 owners are very happy.
2. Definitely, there are electrical issues in the bike- starter coil, battery losing its life in an year or two. Both these issues are occuring all of a sudden and it is not just limited to me as number of people reported the same issue.
3. As a vouch for reliability, should offer free towing in case of breakdowns.
4. Once you start comparing with busa and GSXR, the bar is very high. Then this rivals directly the R's of Yamaha and CBR's of Honda and GSXR's of suzuki!

Final verdict: To be honest i can neither complain or praise the motorcycle completely. There are so many goods to fall in love with the motorcycle and occasional mess ups that question the validity of the love.
Castro Gunner is offline   (7) Thanks
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