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Old 13th June 2019, 07:59   #841
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Default Re: IT Industry and Employability of Technical Graduates

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I happened to stumble upon Vineet Nayar's "Employee first, customers second" TedX Talk and book.
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Any thoughts on this or perhaps even contrary view points since I don't know much about the HCL's journey.
Well, it is not anything new or unique. I have been following the same principles since 15 years with great results.

From my 2013 post:
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In my company it is the only way to go. I put employees first, customers next. If I take care of the employees, they will take care of the customers. Every engineer in my company, started as a trainee here. I know that every trainee is a potential team leader, architect, manager some day in my company. So I groom them to grow into that role. All my team leaders know that grooming their team members is integral part of their job.
Whether it is really the case in HCL, only HCL employees can answer it. This is a very difficult culture to build, because not every manager at every level thinks like this. It is easier if they start as freshers, but to train lateral hires to think like this will require intense orientation and evangelizing.
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Old 13th June 2019, 13:08   #842
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I guess this is the correct place to share my experience with the Indian IT industry. Moderators, please delete if this is not related to the topic of discussion.

I was born in a family where my dad and most of my relatives were employed in PSUs (electrical or civil engineers). Most of my cousins ended up becoming engineers overseas, while the remaining few stayed back and became doctors or joined the armed forces. However, I knew from quite an early age that I wouldn't end up following those paths. I loved learning languages, but I hated calculus, and I still don't know how I got 50% in my board exams. After school, I did not have too many options. I ended up with a miserable rank in the Kerala state engineering entrance exams, but that did not deter my parents from getting me an admission in an engineering college. I somehow completed the course (Before anyone asks, I did not cheat) in 5 years. I still hated calculus, and I also realized that I had no interest in programming. That meant that I could not get a job from any of the recruiters that came to our college.

Jobless and having barely completed graduation, I knew that I had to act fast. I knew that I wouldn't be so lucky if my dad bought me a seat for M Tech. I told my parents that I wanted a break, and that I had decided to travel. I spent a month travelling across India. Most of my destinations were cities where my friends worked. I spoke to them and got an idea of what happens in a workplace. During one of these conversations, I got to know that there were multiple roles in the software industry other than development or management. One such role interested me, and I decided that I would try to become a technical writer. I joined a technical writing course (based on the promise that they would help me find a job) and learnt the basics of technical writing. I kept my options open, and chose to join a small company based in Gurgaon. I took an instant liking for what I was doing, and kept my mind open to learning anything related to my job. I always tried to do my best in whatever I did. Now, eleven years later, I'm still a technical writer, though I added some recognizable and fancier employers to my resume, and I am still enjoying every second of work. I am also lucky enough to earn more than many of my friends who chose to stay in India. Just for reference, I earn approximately 5 times what my wife (a test engineer with the same number of years in the industry, and consistently good appraisals) earns.

I believe I got lucky. However, that luck was partly earned because I understood my strengths and weaknesses quite early. I kept my mind open for opportunities that played to my strengths, and never gave up. I also never compared myself to my more successful relatives or friends.

Last edited by Rehaan : 13th June 2019 at 15:01. Reason: Correcting: could > could not. As per discussion.
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Old 13th June 2019, 14:35   #843
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Default Re: IT Industry and Employability of Technical Graduates

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That meant that I could not get a job from any of the recruiters that came to our college.
Glad you found your calling inside the industry itself.

Last edited by Rehaan : 13th June 2019 at 15:02. Reason: Corrected in original post (and quote). Thanks.
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Old 14th June 2019, 08:09   #844
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Default Re: IT Industry and Employability of Technical Graduates

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I believe I got lucky. However, that luck was partly earned because I understood my strengths and weaknesses quite early. I kept my mind open for opportunities that played to my strengths, and never gave up. I also never compared myself to my more successful relatives or friends.
Great post.

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Well, it is not anything new or unique. I have been following the same principles since 15 years with great results.
That's good to know.

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Whether it is really the case in HCL, only HCL employees can answer it. This is a very difficult culture to build, because not every manager at every level thinks like this. It is easier if they start as freshers, but to train lateral hires to think like this will require intense orientation and evangelizing.
Yeah. I spoke to couple of them and all they could remember was how HCL didn't fire people during 2008 GFC and nothing else about the work culture that Vineet spoke about in the video.
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Old 14th June 2019, 12:30   #845
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Hi,

Went through the thread and lot of matured comments. Like the moment of Deja vu.
Started my career as JAVA developer way back in 2002 and worked in good & fancy companies for 12yrs.

Moved from Arch to PM role in 2014. Since then, life has been roller coaster ride. Most of the PM activities are pushed aside for project co-ordination tasks in big service companies. And when moved to smaller firms, they want PM to be Lead/BA/QA/PMO all in one plus take the mistakes done by team. There is lot of scope in PM for managing the project constraints/client/deliveries/team/scope all along the timeline. But, its not recognized properly. Even good certifications are not recognized, just plain paper.

On the ground, there is no difference in roles of PM/PgrM/DM etc. Like puppets in the hands of Onsite.
On the day of appraisal last year, had to move out without any confrontations due to irresponsible mistake done by Snr Mgmt due to billing issues. No increments last 2 yrs. Even when we say these are our strengths, companies want us to work on unnecessary tasks.

I observed lot of overhead activities in the name of process is going on big time. And few of mgmt folks take shelter in them as to who will bell the cat/pass the buck. Now, I see fresh graduates take PM training and just deployed to replace 13+yrs exp delivery resource within no time. At this juncture, even if we need to upskill what is the point. PM skill is not valued at all and that been my experience since last 5yrs. No offence, just wanted to put my perspective. What other options do we have. High time to move out of PM skill for sure.

Last edited by Eddy : 14th June 2019 at 14:06. Reason: Spacing for better readability
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Old 14th June 2019, 13:30   #846
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Default Re: IT Industry and Employability of Technical Graduates

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.....fresh graduates take PM training and just deployed to replace 13+yrs exp delivery resource within no time. At this juncture, even if we need to upskill what is the point. PM skill is not valued at all and that been my experience since last 5yrs....
It's an unsustainable objective, as many companies large and small are finding out in real time.

Swapping out a butt in a seat that says 'PM' on the back is one thing, having actual skills, both functional/technical and human, is another. Automating repeatable processes and 'project coordination' work well, until they don't, and that's the point where one needs a seasoned individual (or a team) to manage both the technical and human challenges of getting a project back on track.

If PM is your thing, evaluate if you're turning into a Project Coordinator. If the answer is yes, it's time to go back to either being a proper Project Manager (and weathering the cycle of not being valued), or get out. Coordinators have no long-term future, because there isn't much they do that can't be done by a cheaper resource in a couple years, or just automated so a piece of code can do it.

The only thing of real, sustainable value in a tech job is domain expertise. Your real worth to an organisation is what you know, not how many years you've worn a hat. There's plenty of both kinds, and it's invariably the latter who will struggle in the longer term.
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Old 14th June 2019, 22:11   #847
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Just wanted to share my little experience. If you think that AI / ML skills are more values and in much demand, here is something that happened to one of my teams. We needed to do Image detection / object detection for one of the projects and we wanted to have a data scientist in the team to do this, but since we are mostly using cloud infrastructure from Microsoft, one of our team member proposed to use the cognitive services that is offered by the cloud provider and this one had point and click solution to do image detection. Hence we did not need any data scientist per se to join our team! So the point I'm trying to convey is that even ML / AI is not going to be a stable on demand role in the next years or so as most of this will be point and click solutions being offered by these giants (AMG) - You know what I mean!
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