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Why I was impressed with the Mahindra Scorpio-N petrol AT

The XUV 700 is still the better urban vehicle as compared to the Scorpio-N.

BHPian kosfactor recently shared this with other enthusiasts.

As with the Thar and the XUV 7OO - M&M has taken things to the next level with the Scorpio-N.

Driving impressions

The Scorpio-N feels like a more hunkered down 140PS Scorpio. I felt right at home. I could very easily slot into drive and just go as if it's my own vehicle. Tight parking spots did not bother me one bit and I'm not a parking sensor or camera user, but it's easy to park. The direct steering, engine response , the way the vehicle darts through traffic is all exactly like how you expect a Scorpio to be.

The Scoprio-N petrol is eerily quiet, you'd think it's an EV till you floor it and you hear a growl from underneath. I completely forgot that it's an electronic power steering apart from when parking at low speeds where it's super light.

The AT and mStallion motor are trigger happy if prodded, but with smooth throttle input it goes along at a traffic friendly speed with minimal brake use. Brakes are sharp but just right for a tall vehicle, anything more and it would be uncomfortable.

The turn indicator sound is very nice, stereo sounded like how Sony used to be before the subwoofer culture came in, so it's clear and doesn't hurt your ears. I noticed that side glass is thinner now but has a good amount of tinting. You can put a garland on the grill and it will block the front camera adequately; given the height of the bonnet that camera is good to have. Horn pad is not hard and the horn is of the Windtone type.

Just a reminder, the XUV 700 is the better urban vehicle. There is very much the old Scorpio underneath all those creature comforts on the inside and it suits those who need a BOF utility vehicle. Just that it's now more comfortable and silly fast.

PS: I sat in the third row of XUV7OO and N back to back, there isn't much difference.

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