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Old 20th March 2021, 10:51   #5476
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Originally Posted by superguy282 View Post
Currently the only option that pops up in my mind, is the RC100 especially the drop bar version. The only downside which I feel is major is the limited gearing, especially with the respect to the route I take usually and the overall topography of Pune. Which is why I wanted to know other options as well. Thanks in advance!
As an 85 kilo guy who went through the same travails with his ACT over 4 years ago, I can share that you can try all wheel truers, from the hacks to the best (it's an art). Even change nipples and spokes (costly). But in all probability a problem wheel will remain a problem wheel and a source of great annoyance. And kill the fun of riding.

Only solution (in my case that's what I did finally) is to get a complete better quality stronger wheel for the rear. Your extra 10 kilos over me means that it becomes imperative.

Or change the bike,though I'm not sure if the basic Triban is also built for your weight.

I'd go for the more expensive brands. They are built to actually take payloads up to 120 kilos. And they stand by their stared spec claims.

All the best.

Cheers, Doc

Last edited by ebonho : 20th March 2021 at 11:03.
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Old 20th March 2021, 11:55   #5477
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Originally Posted by superguy282 View Post
So today I broke my 8th spoke in a span of 5 months.
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Originally Posted by ebonho View Post
I can share that you can try all wheel truers, from the hacks to the best (it's an art). Even change nipples and spokes (costly).
I have faced issue of broken spokes with my hybrid bike ACT110 as well as current Cannondale Synapse. And I am not a heavy rider (<=65kg). So as suggested by you and Doc, I think in addition to weight, probably the riding style also matters. I might not be called a gentle rider, especially on the type of broken roads we have.

So the solution for me was to keep replacing spokes. Going to mechanic of these modern bike stores costs about 120 to 150 per visit for spoke replacement. So I bought the tools and spokes and do a DIY.

One interesting thing to note is, only the original spokes are breaking and not the replacement ones. So I think it has to do with life of spoke as well.

Doc, why do you think spoke replacement would be an expensive affair? Due to Labor? I buy non-black spokes for my Act. The shop sells me at Rs. 2 a piece. Finding the right size and black in color for Cannondale was a hunt but eventually a shop in Phadke haud had it. He sold it for Rs. 10 a piece. One other shop quoted my 6 a piece but he did not have the correct size in stock.

As suggested by Doc, I think wheel replacement is one solution or like me, if you are into DIY, keep replacing spokes as and when they break. Replacing the full bike just because spokes are breaking is an overkill and you also can't be sure if new bike would not face the same issue.

Last edited by shipnil : 20th March 2021 at 11:56.
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Old 20th March 2021, 13:31   #5478
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Only solution (in my case that's what I did finally) is to get a complete better quality stronger wheel for the rear. Your extra 10 kilos over me means that it becomes imperative.
I did think about this, but wasn't sure about that being the cause. However, it makes sense now, especially with my recent findings. Could you tell me where you procured the wheels from? A few shops do come to my mind as to where I may get them, but I have no experience with any of them. Also, did you change it only for the rear (which is what I would also prefer to do) or did you have to change both? Can I retain the hub, freewheel and spokes and change just the rim?

This options seems to be quite doable once I get the details sorted out. In fact I'd prefer this rather than getting a new one. I am a bit hesitant to let go of this cycle as it has grown on me!
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So as suggested by you and Doc, I think in addition to weight, probably the riding style also matters. I might not be called a gentle rider, especially on the type of broken roads we have.
Yes I believe so too. I rarely slowed down on speed breakers and crashed through them unless there was someone ahead slowing down, which in hindsight was basically inviting the spokes to break. Ever since, I do slow down (although just a touch) and prefer to stand up over these sections. However there is always that one pothhole that catches you offguard and is enough to break a spoke, especially whilst exploring new routes.
Quote:
As suggested by Doc, I think wheel replacement is one solution or like me, if you are into DIY, keep replacing spokes as and when they break. Replacing the full bike just because spokes are breaking is an overkill and you also can't be sure if new bike would not face the same issue.
I do love to DIY, but I would'nt want to do it often and would prefer a rather permanant solution. Replacing the bike came into the picture because of the sheer number of times I've approached the mechanic in the past few months, all of which weren't just for replacing spokes. However, I am going to rethink this and am most likely upgrading the wheels. Thanks a lot!
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Old 20th March 2021, 13:45   #5479
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Doc, why do you think spoke replacement would be an expensive affair? Due to Labor? I buy non-black spokes for my Act. The shop sells me at Rs. 2 a piece. Finding the right size and black in color for Cannondale was a hunt but eventually a shop in Phadke haud had it. He sold it for Rs. 10 a piece. One other shop quoted my 6 a piece but he did not have the correct size in stock.
Yup, availability, cost and the whole hassle of time getting the bike to the mechanic and back (taking the wheel is usually not optimal, in terms of making sure the dishing is correct and the wheel properly centered in the frame). In my experience, spokes on a well adjusted wheel do not break. They are designed to share the load of the rider and any bad hits. Yes, a really bad hit at a really unlucky bad angle will break a spoke on even a well built wheel, but that is an outlier. In my experience there is usually a whole gamut of different reasons before that.

The spokes may be fatigued. They will start breaking one by one, regardless of how well you build the wheel each time.

The rim may be of poor quality or might have weakened (fatigue, wear - especially on rim braked versions).

The hub may be of poor quality and/or may be out a tad. The spokes will keep breaking in such circumstances, regardless of what you do, till you replace the hub. And re-lace the entire wheel afresh.

The hub spoke holes may not be beveled properly and you will then find typically the J elbow type spokes breaking off at one particular point and hole. If you bother to keep track that is ...

But the most important reason is a poorly built (laced) wheel where all the spokes are not under near the same tension and the dishing is wrong, thereby pulling the wheel to one side (which hack mechanics assure you is not an issue and is perfectly normal, and go around the main problem by readjusting the brake calipers so that one side does not touch) ... dishing is the process by which a wheel is centered in the frame in spite of the spokes on one side (the drive side with the cassette) being shorter and more vertical than the non-drive side. It gets more acute on the 11-speed bikes compared to the lower end 7 and 8 speed bikes.

The last point will find you snapping a spoke on a normal hit within a few days of the wheel being worked on.

Solution - never ever go back to the same mecjhanic for wheel truing work. And tell him politely never to touch your wheels.

The cheapest black spokes I got for my ACT were 25-30 bucks from Giant (at RTO). The other shops they cost 50-60 bucks.

For my CAAD I bought a Sapin chromed steel spoke for 65 bucks from D Byk Store.

Quote:
Originally Posted by superguy282 View Post
I did think about this, but wasn't sure about that being the cause. However, it makes sense now, especially with my recent findings. Could you tell me where you procured the wheels from? A few shops do come to my mind as to where I may get them, but I have no experience with any of them. Also, did you change it only for the rear (which is what I would also prefer to do) or did you have to change both? Can I retain the hub, freewheel and spokes and change just the rim?

Yes I believe so too. I rarely slowed down on speed breakers and crashed through them unless there was someone ahead slowing down, which in hindsight was basically inviting the spokes to break. Ever since, I do slow down (although just a touch) and prefer to stand up over these sections. However there is always that one pothhole that catches you offguard and is enough to break a spoke, especially whilst exploring new routes.
I got the wheel directly from the TI cycles factory. I believe it is the OE wheel of the pricier Montra Trance Pro (exact same frame as the ACT110, different fork). The entire built-up wheel. Only the freewheel and tyre and tube came off the old wheel. Only the rear wheel. The front never gave me problems. Never fix what does not need fixing.

And yes, you ALWAYS stand up over a bump, or rumblers, and definitely through a pothole or pipe laying cut in the road. Especially when you are a big guy. That way you are kind to the bike, and kind to your soft parts down below.

Cheers, Doc

Last edited by ebonho : 20th March 2021 at 13:54. Reason: Removed the "man" qualifier for the soft parts, thereby keeping it gender neutral.
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Old 21st March 2021, 13:04   #5480
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Without much further ado, presenting my dream build - Look 795 Blade RS nicknamed Pegasus

Attachment 2133427
This has got to be one of the prettiest, most compelling things (on wheels) that I've ever laid eyes on... seriously...

I'm an old-school guy, but this just shows where new tech and materials can take us.

I suspect it will be a very long time (if ever) before I'd own anything like this myself, but hats off for undertaking to put something together on your own.

A dream bike to be sure...

-Eric
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Old 21st March 2021, 14:20   #5481
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Getting back to humbler endeavors:

Picked up a somewhat battered pair of Giant Revel ex-rentals this past week at quite reasonable price, and subsequently got them mostly (apart from touching up paint) serviced/done up.

The Bicycles thread-img_20210319_15134001_1.jpeg


Beyond the respect generally afforded the brand, I hadn't known much about them despite there being a showroom here; Upon investigation, it seems they are fairly renowned for offering strong, light frames even on (easily upgradable) entry-level models, which is what we have here with the Revel.

The forks on these aren't premium, but being hydraulically-damped are better than some. And they've got proper cassette-style hubs out back, an Acera 3x8 setup, and Shimano mechanical calipers. Seems a pretty robust / reliable setup.

A day after finishing them, someone wants to buy one... Still a cycle supply shortage here, and pricing/range seems to have shifted upwards for the likes of Scott/Giant, as such not sure they have much in the way of solid entry-level stuff on offer right now, and definitely NOT willing to part with the second one right now.

****

As for more personal projects:

Was intrigued by the idea of these 1x gearing setups as are being used a lot now; Saw a great gravel-bike build on YouTube on a vintage Ross roadbike frame that utilized a 1x10 arrangement that really seemed compelling (and with Shimano 150 derailleur not too expensive)... Then last week rode a new carbon-fiber Trek 29'er with 1x12 gearing, which proved I could get more than enough range for my purposes in a 1x...

...the appeal being simplicity & minimalism more than anything else. Less hardware, less gear combinations and ratio overlaps, etc. Everything I need on one thumb.

Only problem being that for sufficient range I would want at least a 10-gear cassette out back... And my newly-fitted sealed-bearing hubs are the threaded freewheel-type!!!

And above 8 gears moves to thinner, costlier chains and chainrings, too... so getting complex & expensive where simplicity/expediency/low-cost was the goal.

Other trouble was that being an alloy frame, I can't physically spread the swingarm apart without compromising the material (as the builder could on that old steel Ross), as I'd probably have to do to allow for 10-12 gears and the attendant greater axle/gear width...

While contemplating all this, came across a crankset with proper bolted, removable gear-rings (vs. riveted, as common on the low-end stuff)...

The Bicycles thread-img_20210321_09062801_1.jpeg

So figured a 2x8/9 could (for now) provide the spread I need and still be accommodated in this frame. I guess a lot of modern mtb's have gone this route gearing-wise, so it looks a little more contemporary and seems an okay compromise / move in the right direction. And leaves me with 16 ratios instead of only 10-12.

So having removed the largest ring (thereby shaving some modest weight), I left the 28/38 rings up front.


Next issue was the lack of options in freewheels... China sources have up to 9-speeds, but of course of dubious quality and transport presently... Suntour has 8's, but not finding an India source.

So resorted to some solid jugaad engineering with grinder and welder, a standard 13x28 mtb unit, and a MegaRange ring from a scrapped Shimano, and built my own 13x34 threaded 8-speed freewheel...!

The Bicycles thread-img_20210321_090646_1.jpg

Had it out for a run today and can say the setup seems about "perfect" (for me)...

Here there is hardly any flat ground, and where there is, the max 38/13 gearing is enough to persuade the full knobbies up to maybe 25 kmph peak...

Not being a speed-freak, am content to mostly coast downhill - while ascents revert to the smaller front ring. Tried the steepest I encounter locally and found it pretty easy with (bit better than standard 21-speed mtb) 28/34 cogs engaged (0.82:1 vs. 0.85:1 std ratio). Upgraded to a plated midrange KMC chain while I was at it, which looks good and runs smooth.

So all's well, and apart from the worn-out fork (some solution for that later, I hope), the bike's finally about where I want it to be...

-Eric

Last edited by ringoism : 21st March 2021 at 14:30.
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Old 21st March 2021, 16:31   #5482
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I am able to get Shimano 105 brake pads and changed all the four of them. The stock ones are rock hard and are like plastic. Quite surprised that the 105s were Japan made. I assume these are the same brake pads that are used on road bikes which are equipped with Shimano 105 Groupset (rim brake). I need to bed them in (use it for some time) to give a conclusion.

The Bicycles thread-20210320_172923.jpg

The Bicycles thread-20210320_172943.jpg

Also changed the Saddle. This is better than stock.

The Bicycles thread-20210321_074335.jpg

The Bicycles thread-20210321_070809.jpg

Now my wife is using the Volante. Here is one small comparison:

Firefox Volante pros:
1. Overall quality is top notch and way better than Decathlon bike, part quality is high and things are very well put together.
2. Brakes are outstanding (V brakes).
3. Lightweight for an Indian made hybrid bike.
4. Altus and Acera components - Not entry level components.
5. Its 1+ year and never faced any issue. No squeaks, rattles.

Firefox Volante cons:
1. Paint quality is not good. I mean it is very thin. I am using automotive polish and wax (Meguiar's) to protect the paint. Also, some masking tape on wire rubbing area. I need to do the same on RC100
2. Parts may be difficult to get. For example: there is no option to order Volante tyre, tube or other parts from Firefox online shop. I have to rely on local stores only.
3. Altus and Acera components - manufacturers mix different components to reduce cost. This is not a good sign to see different model components.
4. The bike is a bit pricey, especially its a local brand.

Triban RC100 Pros:
1. Cheap for a road bike. Can be used to test the road cycle waters.
2. Good for indoor trainer purpose.
3. Parts will be available anywhere in India through Decathlon / online.
4. Does not look cheap or nasty like for example: Schnell bikes. I bought one for my son it is just rubbish.

Triban RC100 cons:
1. People mention that Decathlon bikes are not put together properly. It is true even I experienced the same on my bike. Had to fix the handlebar at a nearby bike shop.
2. When you buy, make sure to check brakes, check all bolts before riding.
3. Decathlon doesn't offer an option to upgrade the brakes, fork or group set. If you want to modify, you need to check outside Decathlon for options.
4. Not a light weight road bike, but light enough.
5. Stock brakes are rubbish
6. Only one factory colour available
7. Don't go to Decathlon during weekends and especially for bike fixing. It is usually very crowded and the mechanics are overloaded.

Sacrilege is coming up. Road cycle purists please skip below.
I find it really hard to ride without a mirror. I able to source one from Amazon. It is typical low quality Chinese product and I need to tighten the screws.

The Bicycles thread-20210321_074343.jpg

I am unable to fix the handlebar holder (80mm) as it requires a spacer which my local bike store does not have. I need to check it later.

Last edited by amvj : 21st March 2021 at 16:42.
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Old 22nd March 2021, 22:24   #5483
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Now my wife is using the Volante. Here is one small comparison:

Firefox Volante pros:
1. Overall quality is top notch and way better than Decathlon bike, part quality is high and things are very well put together.
2. Brakes are outstanding (V brakes).
3. Lightweight for an Indian made hybrid bike.
4. Altus and Acera components - Not entry level components.
5. Its 1+ year and never faced any issue. No squeaks, rattles.

Firefox Volante cons:
...
2. [re: parts availability].
3. Altus and Acera components - manufacturers mix different components to reduce cost. This is not a good sign to see different model components.
4. The bike is a bit pricey, especially its a local brand.
It's good to see Firefox holding up well against a long-established multinational brand.

Re: parts availability I would consider that immaterial, as almost everything on bicycles in this range is basically 3rd party/interchangeable, and items like OE tyres are at any rate often going to be changed/upgraded according to a riders tastes (...and the tyres I wanted from Decathlon have been out of stock anyway!).

The mixing between Acera and Altus should be of no concern, as they are of similar design in a similar range and completely compatible.

Not sure past.assumptions in terms of quality/ pricing should be considered valid re: local/Indian brands vs. names associated with imports, as all lines are getting blurred now. The B'twins (the ones I have) also are made here... Better IMO to judge & compare on essential merits without respect to brand status or nation of origin.

I've got six Firefox mtb's with me right now of various older models, and while mine are very basic component-wise, in quality of construction and weight feel they compare well alongside the entry-level Merida/Giant/Raleigh of similar (or newer) vintage I either own or frequently work on.

Someone bought one of my (battered) Giant Revel's today... they didn't even want to look at the Firefox Targets which are in near-perfect condition and very smooth runners... But it's a mistake IMO to get too hung up on brands, when practically speaking, components being similar/equal, it is really only particulars of frame design (besides paint/aesthetics) that differ in so many cases.

Local showroom mechanic says that as of late, even Suncross has improved dramatically in quality/consistency vs. their previous offerings. And they seem to be doing okay with Raleigh manufacture, too. This from a guy who also sells/services Giant.

-Eric

Last edited by ringoism : 22nd March 2021 at 22:37.
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Old 23rd March 2021, 17:51   #5484
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Minor update: upgraded to Look keo carbon-ceramic pedals bringing the overall weight to sub 8 kgs (around 7.7 to be precise)

The Bicycles thread-a7ddac2d252044568079c72794a8d5f9.jpeg

Nothing much left to do on the bike! Time to put her through some Road races !

Recently did a fast ride and felt quite comfortable with it
The Bicycles thread-99b9bbcdc8994e02b86b09a078afc5af.jpeg
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Old 23rd March 2021, 18:16   #5485
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Minor update: upgraded to Look keo carbon-ceramic pedals bringing the overall weight to sub 8 kgs (around 7.7 to be precise)
Curious - Did you consider an oval chainring? Why, if not.

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Old 23rd March 2021, 20:30   #5486
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... figured a 2x8/9 could (for now) provide the spread I need... leaves me with 16 ratios instead of only 10-12 [of a 1x]... ...left the 28/38 rings up front... Had it out for a run today and can say the setup seems about "perfect" (for me)... Here there is hardly any flat ground, and where there is, the max 38/13 gearing is enough to persuade the full knobbies up to maybe 25 kmph peak....am content to mostly coast downhill - while ascents revert to the smaller front ring. Tried the steepest I encounter locally and found it pretty easy with (bit better than standard 21-speed mtb) 28/34 cogs engaged (0.82:1 vs. 0.85:1 std ratio). Upgraded to a plated midrange KMC chain while I was at it, which looks good and runs smooth.

After the fact, started looking into gearing basics as it applies to mtb/gravel/bikepacking, and came across some good resources for anyone else trying to figure it all out. One is this very useful multifunctional calculator:

http://www.bikecalc.com/

Another is this - both the article and subsequent comments contain quite a lot of good info:

https://bikepacking.com/plan/granny-gear-inches/

Putting the final effective gearing in terms of inches per (crank) revolution makes very good sense and simplifies things a bunch.

I'll keep riding mine as-is for a couple weeks, but I see from the chart generated in the first link that (as I suspected) I actually have a lot of overlap in my ratios between the small & large front chainrings, which seems a bit unnecessary.

Importantly, I also read up a bit on the knee injuries common to those riding with too-slow cadences, and so despite my feeling strong enough for it, thought I might want to try for a slightly smaller low-ring on front for steep climbs, maybe a 24 or 26 in lieu of the 28, if the bolt-circle allows for it.

Btw the 38T/13 gets me close to 30kmph with a 90rpm cadence - considerably better than the 25 I'd figured (maybe accurately, if my cadence is currently closer to 70-75); If I had better-rolling tyres, I could pick up some onroad downhill speed with a 42T... if able to push the cadence to some short bursts up to 100, that would put me around 40kmph... Anyway, this calculator is quite wonderful / informative... the learning curve re:gearing is proving quite fun... and now I need to have a look into my parts bin...

-Eric

Last edited by ringoism : 23rd March 2021 at 20:45.
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Old 24th March 2021, 06:23   #5487
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Without much further ado, presenting my dream build - Look 795 Blade RS nicknamed Pegasus

Attachment 2133427
Wow!. Congratulations!. That sure is an eye candy. The colours and the aero frame comes together quite well. I am sure you will be cutting through the air superbly with this bike. I am not sure if you have mentioned this and I have missed the information, but how much does your build weigh?. Also, if you are on Strava, I would like to follow.

Cheerio!
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Old 24th March 2021, 13:04   #5488
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Fellow cyclists, I want to try cassette with different ratios than the current one that is there on my bicycle. How is the quality of cassettes available in Decathlon? Anyone has first hand experience?
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Old 24th March 2021, 13:48   #5489
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Fellow cyclists, I want to try cassette with different ratios than the current one that is there on my bicycle. How is the quality of cassettes available in Decathlon? Anyone has first hand experience?
AFAIK, Decathlon sells only Microshift or Shimano components regarding gears and its components. So I donít think you can go wrong with those.
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Old 24th March 2021, 15:55   #5490
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Fellow cyclists, I want to try cassette with different ratios than the current one that is there on my bicycle. How is the quality of cassettes available in Decathlon? Anyone has first hand experience?
I bought a 12 32 8 speed for my RC 120 to replace my worn 11 34. This new one is stainless steel, made in Taiwan, no brand name visible. Works OK on my bicycle but I detect a bit of roughness while pedalling.

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