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Old 30th April 2021, 13:23   #1
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Default Motorcycle Restoration | Beginner's Guide

Starting this thread based on a couple of request from members outside this forum and for the benefit of our fellow members and readers.

Motorcycle Restoration | Beginner's Guide-09_copy.jpg

Disclaimer:
- I'm not an expert in restoration, sharing this content based on my learnings from past and inputs from fellow members (inside & outside this forum)
- Further inputs, suggestions, improvements, corrections, critics from anyone is always welcome
- Most important disclaimer, I don't hold any responsibility if you end up spoiling your machine by following these steps If at all anything fails, let's celebrate the failure together


Other thread (How NOT to restore your old motorcycle) on similar subject which I enjoyed the way it was put

Contents:
  • Decision
  • Preparation
  • Execution
  • Finishing

Last edited by Mr.Boss : 2nd May 2021 at 22:51.
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Old 2nd May 2021, 21:50   #2
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Default re: Motorcycle Restoration | Beginner's Guide

Decision

Follow the simple 5W2H analysis
  • What?
  • Why?
  • When?
  • Where?
  • Who?
  • How?
  • How much?

Starting with What?
The obvious answer is Restoration but the indirect question is whether to restore or not?

2 cases here,
  • Classic / vintage : Answer is 'YES' straight away if one has time, money and patience
  • Regular commuter still in production : YES, only if there is any sentimental attachments. Otherwise buying a new one makes sense

I myself did a couple of Pulsar restorations for close friends for some sentimental values and don't want to part with the bike. And both the bikes are immaculately maintained and used until now

Details here https://www.team-bhp.com/forum/motor...ification.html (Bajaj Pulsar 150 Classic - Restoration & Modification)

Motorcycle Restoration | Beginner's Guide-pulsar-black.jpg

Motorcycle Restoration | Beginner's Guide-pulsar-red.jpg

Next comes Why?

It depends on the need. Very few go for a mechanical restoration to keep the machine on duty and most of the restorations I come across (including my own bikes) are not daily driven machine, restored just for the passion, love and lust towards the machine and kept as garage queens (my first RX covered 12k km post restoration in 7 years)

Let's touch How? portion before going for the other 2 W's

The most easiest as well the toughest part is here, making the right decision
- Complete restoration or partial?
- One go or in steps?

This question is mostly answered as an outcome of previous question. Also depends on the condition of machine and ability to spend (sometimes based on the part and labor availability)

My first bike (Blue RX135 ) was done in steps,
- Got the bike, used for a year
- Understood the issues, areas to be addressed
- Started with the tires, brakes and repaired the engine (re-bored to next oversize)
- Cosmetic upgrade, full strip down restoration
- Brakes upgrade (Front disc brake)
- Transmission upgrade (5 speed gearbox)
- Further cosmetic / functional changes (16" rear wheel, rear shocks)

Details here (1998 Yamaha RX135 Restoration completed : Now, 5 speed converted!)
This being my 2nd RX (1st one stayed with me for a very short duration) learnt from my mistakes and were taken care from the 2nd bike onwards.

2nd RX was not in a running condition when I purchased, so I'm left with no other option except to strip down immediately and do a full restoration
Details here (Restoration - 1997 Yamaha RXG)

My suggestion for how to proceed is,
- Get used to the bike before stripping down, understand the issues and areas which needs a change / repair / improvement and then proceed for restoration
- Prioritize : Give importance to the mechanicals than the cosmetic upgrade

Next comes the other portion of How?
  • 100% left to mechanic
  • Partial supervision & direction
  • Jointly with mechanic
  • 100% DIY

It depends mostly on individual's knowledge, ability to spend time and energy. I started with the 3rd option (FYI, my first RX restoration was the very first RX my mechanic worked and stripped down. Our gentlemen agreement was, he has to do whatever I say and I take the full responsibility if anything goes wrong) and once I got enough trust on the mechanic's outcome I moved to 2nd option (after 7+ years one of my RX is getting restored without my presence)

How much?
How much can we spend? This is the most influential and deciding factor for any repair / restoration work. It doesn't mean the quality can be compromised for a lower budget, for any budget constraints split the restoration in steps and prioritize the mechanical job than the cosmetic upgrade.

Where?

Find the right resource (than the expert one) who could put all his effort and passionate on the job rather than someone trying to mint money. Restoration is not like regular repair (especially when it comes to classic and vintage bikes) It needs a lot of attention & dedication otherwise we may end up with V2.0 or V infinity

Incase of DIY, find a dedicated place where you can work peacefully and without disturbing others at home. Otherwise be prepared to get poisoned on the next meal

This was the condition of guest bedroom, hope you can understand the reaction from my better half
Motorcycle Restoration | Beginner's Guide-spares-bed.jpg

When?

Right time for restoration is always "Now" or "ASAP" or "Immediately" after all we are petrol heads and couldn't resist ourselves when it comes to cars and bikes. But depends mostly on the other preparation items,
- Once what, why & how portion is clear
- Detailed check on parts and fund availability is confirmed
- Labor (mechanic, painter, etc) availability (in case of DIY, tools availability)
- Avoid summer and rainy season

My mechanic was kind enough to spend most of the Sundays at my home (opening the garage will have too many distractions)
Motorcycle Restoration | Beginner's Guide-bikes-home-1.jpg

Motorcycle Restoration | Beginner's Guide-bikes-home-2.jpg

Motorcycle Restoration | Beginner's Guide-bikes-home-3.jpg

Last edited by Aditya : 4th May 2021 at 16:59. Reason: Typo
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Old 2nd May 2021, 23:14   #3
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Default re: Motorcycle Restoration | Beginner's Guide

Preparation

Something to keep in mind

Motorcycle Restoration | Beginner's Guide-83a9bd5715dff3f17a2c6044b31dc75e.jpg

Better outcomes are guaranteed if the preparation phase is handled with care. I suggest to spend some additional time and energy during the preparation phase to avoid spending multiple folds later. Speaking from my own experience, I had started a couple of projects without proper planning and either couldn't complete on time or abandoned.

one such example is here (Building a 'Pocket Bike' out of a TVS Scooty ES)

For first timers it is always good to take support or KT from someone who has failed in past. Believe me, 1 failure story teaches a lot more than hundreds of success stories. I don't mean or ask to refrain from taking the advice from one who succeeded, it is more beneficial to understand Dos and Don'ts rather than following only the Dos.

Preparation starts with,
  • Collecting the manuals (parts catalogue, repair / service manual)
  • Align with mechanics and other agencies for timeline and cost
  • Arrange sufficient funds and space (if required to store the parts)
  • Understand what needs a repair or replacement or upgrade
  • Note down the list of parts to procure (use parts catalogue to to avoid missing anything)
  • Check for parts availability locally. Otherwise find the right source

Collected few manuals online and some scanned copies through fellow members of Team-BHP & other forums

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Motorcycle Restoration | Beginner's Guide-exploded_autolube_pump.jpg

Motorcycle Restoration | Beginner's Guide-mikuni.jpg

Last edited by Mr.Boss : 3rd May 2021 at 08:19.
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Old 3rd May 2021, 08:43   #4
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Default re: Motorcycle Restoration | Beginner's Guide

Execution

1. Wash the bike

Before stripping down, wash the bike without fail. A proper pressure wash and de-greasing (Kerosene or Diesel being used by mechanics) the areas where the oil leak or grease accumulation will save you from future tragedies.

Quoting from our fellow member RiderZone's post
https://www.team-bhp.com/forum/motor...otorcycle.html (How NOT to restore your old motorcycle)
Quote:
Mistake 2: Not washing the bike

I donít know why I didnít wash it before I started work on it, a few minutes of hosing would have made the next few months so much easier.

The whole thing was covered in a mixture of grease, oil, and mud, there was simply no place you could touch without getting your hands dirty. My shiny new Nitrile gloves were a gooey mess within minutes, I had to resort to using my momís hair dying transparent glove thingies, which obviously were a disaster.

Even with all my precautions, the floor, the tools, and everything that the bike touched were covered in black ooze. It was a slimy, sticky, slippery mess for the remainder of the project.
I did the same mistake during my earlier restorations. Though everything was done at mechanic's place (which is messy usually) logistics could have been easier and clean if the bike was washed in advance.

This was the condition after dismantling
Motorcycle Restoration | Beginner's Guide-img_0279.jpg

And I'm left with no other option but to take everything to nearby water wash centre and get them washed properly before I give them for sandblasting
Motorcycle Restoration | Beginner's Guide-2.jpg

Took this learning and for the subsequent restorations we started with washing. For reference, this is how the frame looked after dismantling from a washed bike
Motorcycle Restoration | Beginner's Guide-washed-frame.jpg


2. Collect the necessary tools

Repair / service manual can save a lot of time here (especially for the special tools like pullers) It is worth investing on such special tools if the bike will be retained for ever. Sometimes making a custom tool saves space and one single tool can handle multiple vehicles (Eg: magnet pullers, with variable PCD studs)

We normally do the dismantling and assembly late in the evening or sometimes during mid night. There are instances where we are left with no support for such special tools (or sometimes no replacement for a broken impact driver) in the middle of night and we had to wind-up without completing the job. So it is always better to have a back-up before starting the job.

Make sure to have below items before dismantling
  • All necessary tools
  • Parts catalogue, all manuals
  • WD40 (or a similar agent)
  • Bins and boxes to secure the parts
  • Cotton waste
  • PPE (most ignored item)
  • Dremel / engraving tool (to mark identification in parts, to avoid misplacing or parts swap)

3. Dismantling

This is the most easy & enjoyable job in restoration. Anyone who could hold a spanner or screw driver could accomplish the mission in few hours. But if the right order / sequence was not followed, we may end up with a tedious process later.

Below is the sequence I follow for Yamaha RX
  • Drain all fluids (Petrol, transmission oil, 2T oil)
  • Start from the body panels & accessories (Seat, Fuel tank, side shields, chain guard, battery)
  • Disengage the control cables and chain
  • Open the engine side case
  • Remove the clutch assembly, magnet & coil assembly
  • Remove Carburetor and exhaust & plug the manifolds
  • Remove Head and bore, then take off the engine bottom end from the frame
  • Loosen all necessary fasteners (T-stem, fork, rear shocks, axle bolts, crash guard, etc)
  • Dismantle all other parts, securing the frame on wheels & center stand as much as possible

Helping hand is always better, but remember TOO MANY COOKS SPOIL THE BROTH

Motorcycle Restoration | Beginner's Guide-too-many-hands.jpg
This involved 4 people - mechanic, couple of his friends and yours truly (behind the lens) and the bike was dismantled in less than 25 mins. Guess what, few small bits (magnet woodruff key, couple of other balls) went missing and none of us knew where it went.

While dismantling make sure to segregate the parts accordingly
  • Parts for painting
  • Platting (worthy to be platted)
  • Lathe work (re-bore, crank calibration, clutch basket reset, etc)
  • Other repair (Seat, electrical coil check, etc)
  • Secure for future
  • Scrap (Keep aside, don't discard anything until the restoration is completed)

Clean the parts as much as possible while dismantling or before sending then for further processing
Motorcycle Restoration | Beginner's Guide-cleaned-parts.jpg

Make sure to have identification marks engraved on the critical parts that goes out for repair work. These days people are so greedy to swap the genuine and good parts with fake and useless goods. Remember, the 'made in japan' novelty has a huge market when it comes to RX & RD parts.

Last edited by Mr.Boss : 3rd May 2021 at 14:49.
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Old 3rd May 2021, 10:47   #5
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Default re: Motorcycle Restoration | Beginner's Guide

Execution - Contd...

4. Painting
  • Make sure to have the frame (and related parts) tinkered for any repair work (common areas will be on the center stand pin hole wear, rear or bottom areas of frame due to rusting)
  • Sand blast or chemical etching to remove the existing paint (there are enough debate on YouTube on which is good and bad, I let to choose based on the availability)
  • Between painting or powder coating, again choose based on the availability
  • In any case make sure the painting is done in a controlled environment

In case of DIY, use proper PPE and exhaust system (base minimum as suction fan) and follow the multi-coat painting process (I'm not an expert on this subject) with enough curing time between each coat.

5. Platting
  • Segregate the parts and plate them only if they are worthy to be done (some cases getting a new part makes sense both in terms of money and effort than platting them)
  • Decarb the exhaust
  • For fasteners, take care to maintain the platting thickness (excess thickness will increase the critical dimension and I myself ended spoiling the threads in engine case once)

6. Repair

<<Need basis>>
Especially for the re-bore job, find a competent garage who keeps the maximum precision. Most of the garages I came across recently were running with (ab)used machines and out of precision. My last restoration (Red candy - RX100) was done with one such example and the engine seized already, where as the very first restoration (Blue RX135) done with my regular guy is running fine after 7+ years (touch wood)

Same applies for the crank calibration & clutch basket reset with new rubber kit. Quality of workmanship is most important here.

Cover the painted, platted and repaired parts safely until the bike is assembled back

Motorcycle Restoration | Beginner's Guide-bins.jpg

Last edited by Mr.Boss : 3rd May 2021 at 12:38.
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Old 3rd May 2021, 12:17   #6
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Default re: Motorcycle Restoration | Beginner's Guide

Execution - Contd...

7. Procuring the parts

Comes next the most tedious job these days. Market is flooded with greedy sellers quoting a hand and leg for classic / vintage bike parts and equally flooded with cheap and fake parts (especially in OE packing) It needs some eagle eyes or trustworthy source to buy genuine stuffs.

For Yamaha parts I'm really missing Indiaspares.in who used to supply genuine parts at MRP (Boodmo of Yamaha spares those day)

Motorcycle Restoration | Beginner's Guide-india-spares.jpg

Few care points,
  • Either find genuine and trustworthy source for online purchase or buy stuffs from local market after seeing them in person.
  • Olx and Facebook groups are filled with fake parts and greedy sellers
  • Few ecommerce sites (including Flipkart and Amazon) has some cosmetic parts listed, but some are not genuine and some are priced higher than MRP
  • Before heading out for purchase (or ordering online) use the parts catalogue to list down the parts requirement
  • Once ordered or purchased partially, mark them again on the parts catalogue
  • While buying used spares, make sure about the current condition of part rather than the manufacturing location.
  • In simple, don't fall for the 'Made in Japan' or 'Imported' tags. Remember, though there is a difference in manufacturing quality, how well the part was used or abused in past matters a lot when it comes to used parts
  • Even for the novelty of 'Made in Japan' or 'NOS' parts, be sure what to purchase and what not the purchase (One classic example is people quote 10x price for a 2 decade old NOS Oil seal which already lost it's shelf life and as good as a scrap now)

This part was removed from my bike since the clutch milling worn out and couldn't function well.
Motorcycle Restoration | Beginner's Guide-japan-parts.jpg

Swapped with a brand new case & kept aside this one thinking for getting it repaired later. Someone I knew (dealing in used spares) was looking for this made in japan case and I sold him for a mere scrap rate (to recover the logistics cost) and guess what, the same part was posted in FB groups for 5x the MRP.

Some parts (including consumables) are hard to source these days. So if you could find such parts, get them in bulk (or at least a few more spare) and secure for future

Sometimes back Motul 2T oil (not even the synthetic one) was not available and managed to get an entire case and stored. I'm left with 2 or 3 cans now
Motorcycle Restoration | Beginner's Guide-2t-oil.jpg

Sometimes we may end up buying a donor bike for the spares. Gladiator in background was a proper running bike purchased for the alloy wheels and Front disc brake.
Motorcycle Restoration | Beginner's Guide-gladi.jpg

After removing the required parts few items were sold and the left out was scrapped (and recovered more than the purchase price )

Last edited by Mr.Boss : 3rd May 2021 at 12:36.
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Old 3rd May 2021, 14:10   #7
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Default re: Motorcycle Restoration | Beginner's Guide

Execution - Contd...

8. Assembly
  • Before start to assemble the bike, once again cross check if all necessary parts, tools and manuals are in place
  • Segregate the parts well in advance (sub assembly parts like engine components, Fork oil seals, springs, locks, etc)
  • Keep the parts catalogue and repair manual nearby, tick the parts once the assembly is done (to make sure no part is left out)
  • Use proper tools (like pullers) and avoid hammering as much as possible
  • Clean the engine internals and use compressed air to remove any dirt (having a clean room for engine sub assembly is preferred)
  • Note that hammering the engine case or parts will disturb the crank calibration and will seriously affect the performance
  • Some people heat the engine case for easy insertion of bearings, but keep in mind excessive heating will spoil the case and adversely affect the functioning and performance
  • Pre-lubricate the gears and engine internals
  • If the coil plate has slots or additional mounting holes, make sure to maintain correct timing with necessary tools
  • Ensure the functioning of gear shift and clutch operation, neutral indicator before completing the sub-assembly
  • Complete the other sub assemblies (Fork, wheel truing, Hub, bearing & sprockets, brake assembly, etc) and ensure their readiness
  • For main assembly, start with the cycle parts (frame, fork, wheels, T-stem, handle bar and follow reverse order of dismantling
  • Ensure proper tightening torque as mentioned in service manual (I did this for only one bike when I could get hold of a torque wrench. Others were based on gut feeling)
  • Ensure the electrical connections are in place
  • Fill all fluids (better not to fix the fuel tank. Use a testing can to fire the engine)
  • For a freshly bored engine, make the run-in with intermittent gap
  • Adjust the AF ratio by tuning the carburetor

Better to take an expert help (if required) for engine sub assembly. This saves re-opening the engine case if something goes wrong. Here is the picture of my mechanic getting 'gyan' from his 'guru' during our first restoration. He was kind enough to explain the reason behind certain practices and best practices.
Motorcycle Restoration | Beginner's Guide-expert-help.jpg

One example of upgrading for better performance without spoiling the OE looks. RX has pathetic headlamp (even going by 2 decade old standards) and this is the only option to retain the classic look and enhancing the light throw
Motorcycle Restoration | Beginner's Guide-hl-upgrade.jpg

One example of how not the do the assembly.
Crank area to be covered with clean cloth or a card board secured with 4 studs to avoid any parts or dirt getting inside
Motorcycle Restoration | Beginner's Guide-how-not-.jpg

Using wrong tool to open the sprocket nuts damaged the hub
Motorcycle Restoration | Beginner's Guide-hub-damage.jpg

After trying out many combination of shock absorbers (ignoring few expert advise) I understood nothing beats the OE spec. Using a wrong height affects the dynamics and also puts a lot of load on the chain and sprocket (due to change in swing arm articulation path)
Motorcycle Restoration | Beginner's Guide-shcoks.jpg

Last edited by Mr.Boss : 3rd May 2021 at 14:48.
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Old 3rd May 2021, 15:34   #8
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Default re: Motorcycle Restoration | Beginner's Guide

Finalizing
  • Once the bench run-in is completed, recheck all tightening torque
  • Have a trial run in a not so crowded area (accompanied by an escort vehicle)
  • Fine tune the carb, clutch and brake play
  • After couple of hundred kilometers tighten the chain slag, brakes and clutch play (if required)

With this we are completing the restoration and enjoy riding the machine.

Next comes the important episode of securing the parts for future.
  • Items listed as scrap during dismantling, check once again and secure what ever may be required for future and discard the rest
  • Secure critical parts for future use
  • Remember, parts price is increasing multiple folds now and some are not available any more.

Few such cases from Yamaha RX

Part name - Old price (2~3 years ago) - New price
  • Speedo meter - 500 - 1.1k
  • Chain guard - 700 - 2.8k
  • Fuel cock - 79 - 270
  • Cylinder kit - 8k - Out of production

Used parts
  • Standard bore - 4k - 15k
  • 5s gearbox - 5k - 12k

When I did my first restoration people advised to stock few parts (cylinder kit to be specific) which I ignored and today when I understood the necessity I couldn't find one. Now started getting the used parts and preserving them for future. Today I could make 1 complete RX100/RX135/RXG with the available spares if I could get a frame

Thanks for spending your valuable time here. For any updates / corrections / improvements, please feel free to add.
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Old 3rd May 2021, 20:31   #9
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Default re: Motorcycle Restoration | Beginner's Guide

Some related threads

https://www.team-bhp.com/forum/motor...otorcycle.html (How NOT to restore your old motorcycle)

https://www.team-bhp.com/forum/motor...tutorials.html (Yamaha RX Series Bikes : DIY Video Tutorials)

https://www.team-bhp.com/forum/motor...converted.html (1998 Yamaha RX135 Restoration completed : Now, 5 speed converted!)

https://www.team-bhp.com/forum/motor...ts-pieces.html (Yamaha RX100 restoration - From bits & pieces)

https://www.team-bhp.com/forum/motor...amaha-rxg.html (Restoration - 1997 Yamaha RXG)

https://www.team-bhp.com/forum/motor...storation.html (1990 Yamaha RX100 Restoration)

https://www.team-bhp.com/forum/motor...completed.html (OMG! 3rd RX at home - 1998 Yamaha RX135 4S. EDIT: Restoration completed!)

https://www.team-bhp.com/forum/motor...ification.html (Bajaj Pulsar 150 Classic - Restoration & Modification)

https://www.team-bhp.com/forum/motor...completed.html (Got gifted a Yamaha RD350. EDIT: Restoration completed)

https://www.team-bhp.com/forum/motor...-me-again.html (I bought a Suzuki Shogun to Restore. UPDATE: Back with me again!)

https://www.team-bhp.com/forum/motor...storation.html (Kashmir ki Kali - My Yamaha RXZ restoration)

https://www.team-bhp.com/forum/motor...ood-crush.html (My Yamaha RX100 restoration thread - A tribute to my childhood crush)

https://www.team-bhp.com/forum/motor...different.html (Another Yamaha RX build...wait, this time itís different)

https://www.team-bhp.com/forum/motor...ll-almost.html (Yamaha RD 350 - Restored (well, almost))

https://www.team-bhp.com/forum/post-...intenance.html (Lambretta scooters - Restoration & Maintenance)

https://www.team-bhp.com/forum/motor...storation.html (Yamaha RD350 Restoration)

https://www.team-bhp.com/forum/motor...aha-rx100.html (Reliving my college days! Restoration of the dearest 1995 Yamaha RX100)

https://www.team-bhp.com/forum/motor...135-tiger.html (Restoring '98 model Yamaha Rx 135 Tiger)

https://www.team-bhp.com/forum/motor...aha-rx100.html (Old Love, New Form : Restoring my '91 Yamaha RX100)

https://www.team-bhp.com/forum/motor...-now-sold.html (My 2002 Yamaha RXZ - Update: Now Sold!)

https://www.team-bhp.com/forum/motor...bajaj-m80.html (Semi-restoration of my Bajaj M80)

Last edited by Mr.Boss : 3rd May 2021 at 22:05.
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Old 4th May 2021, 06:15   #10
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Default re: Motorcycle Restoration | Beginner's Guide

Thread moved out from the Assembly Line. Thanks for sharing!
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Old 4th May 2021, 07:16   #11
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Default re: Motorcycle Restoration | Beginner's Guide

That Yamaha looks like its just come out of the showroom. Very good restoration indeed. I'm interested in that story. Did you add a disc brake? And from which bike is it sourced from?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr.Boss View Post
Disclaimer:
- I'm not an expert in restoration, sharing this content based on my learnings from past and inputs from fellow members (inside & outside this forum
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Old 4th May 2021, 07:49   #12
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Default Re: Motorcycle Restoration | Beginner's Guide

Written like a boss ! THANK YOU, Mr. Boss - very nicely put together, with references to other threads.

Btw, one question - is 2T getting difficult to procure ? How long can you store it if you get stock like a carton of it ?
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Old 4th May 2021, 08:26   #13
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Default Re: Motorcycle Restoration | Beginner's Guide

Phenomenal thread, Mr. Boss! Thanks for sharing. Going to our homepage today .

Having restored an old Jeep to excellent condition, I will add the following points that are universal to restoring an old bike or car:

• Make sure you really, really love the vehicle needing restoration. It takes a LOT of effort, money & time and you will get a good result only if you are really motivated. I have seen way too many abandoned projects. It should be the kind of vehicle that is really special (whether in terms of character or nostalgia).

• Ensure that the vehicle itself is restorable. In the car world, a mechanically-simple Mercedes W124 / W126 is restorable, but an electronically-complex W140 isn't.

• You need to have access to an excellent independent garage which understands the vehicle and / or has lots of experience with it. This is perhaps the most important point. It's like choosing the right doctor for your heart bypass surgery.

• Whatever your planned budget is, I will bet that the final bill will be 50 - 100% higher. Budget for that.

• Whatever your deadline is, I can bet that you will overshoot it by 2X.

• Don't cut corners. Go for the best quality parts (either OEM or better than OEM).

• Don't cut corners. Go for the best quality labour. My rebuilt Jeep has better reliability than when it came from the factory!! What's more, the factory-built Jeep suffered massive rust in 5 - 6 years. My rebuilt Jeep has lesser rust after 10 years, thanks to best practices such as Wurth coatings etc.

• Forget about 100% perfection. What I have realised with large projects (whether restoring a vehicle or renovating your home) is that 80% perfection and a "very good" high quality output take up an acceptable amount of time. But chasing that final 20% perfection (e.g. finishing in areas where you won't even bother to look later in life, exacting panel gaps) take up as much time as the initial 80% of the project. That's why, with very large projects, I am now 100% satisfied with an 8 / 10 result. Primarily because I don't have the time or bandwidth anymore for that final 20% enhancement. Instead of spending 4 additional months chasing perfection, I would rather take my vehicle out on drives & road-trips.
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Old 4th May 2021, 08:39   #14
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Default Re: Motorcycle Restoration | Beginner's Guide

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sebring View Post
That Yamaha looks like its just come out of the showroom. Very good restoration indeed. I'm interested in that story. Did you add a disc brake? And from which bike is it sourced from?
Thank you. Disc kit is from Yamaha Gladiator
More details about the bike is Here (Yamaha RX100 restoration - From bits & pieces)

Quote:
Originally Posted by condor View Post
Written like a boss ! THANK YOU, Mr. Boss - very nicely put together, with references to other threads.

Btw, one question - is 2T getting difficult to procure ? How long can you store it if you get stock like a carton of it ?
Thanks for the kind words.
2T oil as such is not difficult to source. Motul had some supply issue sometimes back (especially in the area where I live) and managed to get this last carton stock from the distributor. Motomix 2T is easy to source then the other synthetic blends from Motul.

Most grades of motor oil have shelf life from 3-5 years. Those days my monthly usage was nothing less than 500-800km, and 1 can (500ml) should last for 1 tank fill (close to 500km) roughly translating I should have consumed the entire stock in less than 2 years. But since the running got reduced I'm left with 2 or 3 cans now.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GTO View Post
Phenomenal thread, Mr. Boss! Thanks for sharing. Going to our homepage today .

Having restored an old Jeep to excellent condition, I will add the following points that are universal to restoring an old bike or car:
Thank you.
I wish I get a chance to do a 4 wheeler restoration

Last edited by Mr.Boss : 4th May 2021 at 08:42.
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Old 4th May 2021, 10:38   #15
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Default Re: Motorcycle Restoration | Beginner's Guide

Fantastic article Mr Boss and thank you for sharing your valuable experience/learning with others.

For people doing DIY and especially for the first time it would be better if you make short videos of critical parts being dismantled and store them in marked bags or trays. Reason why I say to make a video is when a bike like even the RX is dismantled completely the amount of small parts around is phenomenal and easy to misplace or get confused with what goes where and the video would be a good reference point. And as always better to do it with some experienced head around.

Also never over tighten bolts and be careful of the torque specification of each part. Like you don’t want to damage irreplaceable parts like heads crankcase etc.

This is how one should go about tightening the head bolts(cross). Never tighten the bolt to its fullest in one go and instead do a few turns a time and keep checking if all is in order.

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr.Boss View Post
When I did my first restoration people advised to stock few parts (cylinder kit to be specific) which I ignored and today when I understood the necessity I couldn't find one. Now started getting the used parts and preserving them for future. Today I could make 1 complete RX100/RX135/RXG with the available spares if I could get a frame

Thanks for spending your valuable time here. For any updates / corrections / improvements, please feel free to add.
Living around RD 350’s made me realise the value of having spare parts for the future and luckily I did that a good decade ago when they were available at MRP rates. Back then Jhaveri Auto was giving up their Yamaha dealership for Honda and that meant a lot of OE spare parts were available for grabs. I used to go their and just tell them what parts you have for the RX series and pick up almost everything in quantities I thought I may require in the future. Now that investment feels like Gold but just like household Gold one will never sell it no matter what

I always take out the parts clean and check every few month’s/years. And this is not even the entire stock as they are scattered all around the house along with my scale models

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These dual coloured air filters are non existent now and even though it’s worthless now (disintegrated as these don’t have a long shelf life) I have kept it as a memorable.

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Quote:
Originally Posted by condor View Post
Btw, one question - is 2T getting difficult to procure ? How long can you store it if you get stock like a carton of it ?
When I did my cosmetic restoration on my RX 135 and RD 200 I ran out of my regular Motul 2t Oil stock and could manage to get a few cans via amazon. I think they now cost 170 for 500 ml.

I also have some cans of Motul 800 with Ester which are over a decade old and visibly still good.

Last edited by SnS_12 : 4th May 2021 at 10:50.
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