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Old 19th October 2020, 15:53   #136
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Default Re: Review: My Yamaha R1 (WGP 50th Anniversary Edition)

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Originally Posted by james View Post
This is one of the few threads on tbhp that really interest me and I regularly check back for updates. Anyone who works on their vehicles has my respect and that respect increases multi-fold when a torque wrench is thrown into the equation.

Ride safe!

Cheers!
Thanks for the kind words, James. And about the Torque Wrench, it nerds me out to super high level for some reason. I am currently saving up for one. Something in a reasonable range to work on my bikes. Hopefully, in the coming months I'll have one.

Cheers
Krishna
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Old 20th October 2020, 15:37   #137
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Default Re: Review: My Yamaha R1 (WGP 50th Anniversary Edition)

Quote:
Originally Posted by james View Post
This is one of the few threads on tbhp that really interest me and I regularly check back for updates. Anyone who works on their vehicles has my respect and that respect increases multi-fold when a torque wrench is thrown into the equation.
+1. Amazing how many garages get by without a torque wrench.
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Old 20th October 2020, 16:32   #138
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Default Re: Review: My Yamaha R1 (WGP 50th Anniversary Edition)

Hey there enjoyed reading this post. Do you mind telling me which torque wrench you use to work on you R1? We are looking to start working on our Z800 by ourselves. Would be good to know what tools we need to get started.
Thanks!
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Old 20th October 2020, 18:02   #139
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Default Re: Review: My Yamaha R1 (WGP 50th Anniversary Edition)

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Originally Posted by tuttusai0264 View Post
Hey there enjoyed reading this post. Do you mind telling me which torque wrench you use to work on you R1? We are looking to start working on our Z800 by ourselves. Would be good to know what tools we need to get started.
Thanks!
Hi, Thanks for the kind words.

Well for the Torque Wrench, it belongs to my friend and the brand is Britool, which is a sister brand to Stanley from what I understand.
The one used is the BRITOOL EVT600A 1/2'' Square Drive Torque Wrench, this particular one can be used to tighten from 12-68 Nm.

Now as far as getting started with working on your bike. A set of basic tools should work, they are not that costly even if you are considering to buy Stanley or Taparia brands.

I'll post here a photo of what bare minimum basic stuff is required and will post the amazon links to them too.

A part of my Essential set of tools. Link to products listed below
Review: My Yamaha R1 (WGP 50th Anniversary Edition)-img_1823.jpeg

Taparia C - Clamp
Review: My Yamaha R1 (WGP 50th Anniversary Edition)-img_1810.jpeg

Nose Pliers
Review: My Yamaha R1 (WGP 50th Anniversary Edition)-img_1798.jpeg

A good quality sliding T Square handle 1/2" to which you can attach sockets of bigger sizes to attach or remove high torque bolts/nuts. I use this

A good 1/4'' Square Drive Metric Socket Set. I use this

Good set of magnetic tip Phillips and flat screwdriver

A tiny 2 in 1 screwdriver to reach tight spots. Use this, You can thank me later for this one

A good SQ. Drive Metric 1/2'' 6 Point Socket Set. I use this

Now if a rachet set is not something you want it is al; ways good to invest in a good set of combination spanner set. With one end being a ring spanner and another end being an open-end spanner. I use a set from Stanley, here is the link

T handle Allen key set, I use this. These are a lifesaver as compared to the normal more portable set like these. I have both just for the portability convenience.

A good mallet. I use the Taparia branded soft-faced mallet with plastic ends which can be unscrewed and replaced with different sizes or new set if required.

If you want to work with brakes and seized caliper pistons and the likes, get yourself a C-clamp like this. This works for all the bike that I have.

And finally a good set of Cutting Pliers and Nose Pliers. These come in handy when dealing with removing clips and clamps. Any brand should do.

Now I do have quite a bit more tools which might be a bit overwhelming to start with, but once you start working you will get a fair idea of what is required and what is not. I did not get all these at once, rather it has been bought over a period of 1-2 years and continues to grow. But this should be a good starting point. Hope this helped. Happy wrenching to you.

Cheers
Krishna

Last edited by krishnaprasadgg : 20th October 2020 at 18:26. Reason: Added more details about the tool asked
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Old 20th October 2020, 22:12   #140
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Default Re: Review: My Yamaha R1 (WGP 50th Anniversary Edition)

Wonderful log Krish. The amount of satisfaction with such DIY is extremely extremely positive. And I echo the other Bhpian's notion, throw in a torque wrench and I am extremely happy. Ride safe, keeping taking good care of her.

Cheers!
VJ
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Old 20th October 2020, 23:19   #141
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Default Re: Review: My Yamaha R1 (WGP 50th Anniversary Edition)

[quite common as dirt build-up sometimes cause them to seize up a bit. Just a healthy dose of brake cleaner can fix this issue

Ideally you would have to remove pistons and clean caliper, grease the pistons and put them back in. That would ensure longer service interval for this part. Not sure if that's different for super bikes.

Also where do you get the parts for R1?
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Old 21st October 2020, 07:27   #142
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Default Re: Review: My Yamaha R1 (WGP 50th Anniversary Edition)

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Originally Posted by SS80 View Post
Ideally you would have to remove pistons and clean caliper, grease the pistons and put them back in. That would ensure longer service interval for this part. Not sure if that's different for super bikes.
You are spot on mate. Nothing special for superbikes either, it's the exact same procedure.
Ideally, a proper brake rebuild would see be with the caliper fully detached from the bike(brake lines removed) and pistons will be pushed out and cleaned thoroughly, the piston seating sleeves will also be cleaned as there is will be a deposit/gunk in them from older brake fluid as well.

The issue is when you remove the pistons it's advised to replace the seals as well. Since the braking is quite ok (even though I am not happy with the feedback) we had decided we would do a caliper level and piston outer area clean and see how smooth the piston activation is and if they are terribly seized up then put in an order for the brake seal kit from Yamaha or any aftermarket brake rebuild kits and perform a proper rebuild.
But since we found the front to be pretty smooth apart from 1 piston on the left side caliper which was sorted after a surface level clean and the rear caliper which was much harder but worked well enough for the amount of usage it has we decided there is no immediate need to do a complete rebuild.

So maybe once I am approaching 30k km or so will test the braking again and get the rebuild kit and have at it. Rest assured that will be documented too in detail.

The only reason I did not mention the thought process in the previous post was because it would have made the post even more unwantedly long.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SS80 View Post
Also where do you get the parts for R1?
There are ordered directly from Yamaha Bangalore parts guy. They are pretty easy to come by, and pretty cheap too.

Cheers
Krishna

Last edited by krishnaprasadgg : 21st October 2020 at 07:28.
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Old 21st October 2020, 12:50   #143
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Default Re: Review: My Yamaha R1 (WGP 50th Anniversary Edition)

As a DIY biker myself, i d love to highlight here that clicking lots of pics with each step when you have dirty greasy hands is a tedious and appreciable job. The way you logged it all is just wow. I d update my own thread with pictorial DIY too because reading yous, I could see how passionate the OP must be for his ride.
Cheers.
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Old 21st October 2020, 21:18   #144
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Default Re: Review: My Yamaha R1 (WGP 50th Anniversary Edition)

Lovely thread, Krishna! Rated 5 Stars.

As a fellow Crossplane R1 owner (albeit a 2010), I could empathise on several points
The R1 was a dream come true for me - from a wall poster in my bedroom as a student to the actual machine in my garage several years later.
I absolutely love it and even rode it to my wedding

There are definitely bikes that are quicker, faster and better-handling than the Crossplane but maybe only the RSV4 can match up to it when it comes to CHARACTER.
The 2009 - 2014 R1 is a motorcycle that can scare the crap out of you if you try riding it beyond your limit and this makes you really respect it.

Sharing a few photos from CSS last year. I highly recommend that you take your R1 to track but make sure to have the right tyres and brake upgrades in place. I installed Metzeler RACETEC RR rubber, a Brembo RCS 19 unit, Galfer steel-braided brake lines, Vesrah Super RJL XX Brake Pads and ran Motul RBF 660 high temperature brake fluid and all of these these paid huge dividends on MMRT.

Looking forward to more updates!

Ride safe,
Aaron
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Review: My Yamaha R1 (WGP 50th Anniversary Edition)-003.jpg  

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Old 22nd October 2020, 08:51   #145
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Default Re: Review: My Yamaha R1 (WGP 50th Anniversary Edition)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Entsurgeon View Post
As a DIY biker myself, i d love to highlight here that clicking lots of pics with each step when you have dirty greasy hands is a tedious and appreciable job. The way you logged it all is just wow. I d update my own thread with pictorial DIY too because reading yous, I could see how passionate the OP must be for his ride.
Cheers.
Thanks for the kind words Doc, And yes please do post your DIY works too. It'd be epic to read and watch.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TurboGTR View Post
Lovely thread, Krishna! Rated 5 Stars.

As a fellow Crossplane R1 owner (albeit a 2010), I could empathise on several points
The R1 was a dream come true for me - from a wall poster in my bedroom as a student to the actual machine in my garage several years later.
I absolutely love it and even rode it to my wedding
Thanks a lot, Aaron.
We practically have the same bike minus the TC I guess. But Boy does your bike look killer in the full black scheme. And that Arai lid is just pure envy . Lovely track pics.

Quote:
There are definitely bikes that are quicker, faster and better-handling than the Crossplane but maybe only the RSV4 can match up to it when it comes to CHARACTER.
The 2009 - 2014 R1 is a motorcycle that can scare the crap out of you if you try riding it beyond your limit and this makes you really respect it.
Absolutely no doubt. My first few days with the bike was quite intimidating, even now I don't dare to WOT the bike in any conditions. But the thrill of riding it way below its actual limit itself is exhilarating enough, to be honest. I still have quite a bit to extract from the bike. The suspension setup is not fine-tuned at all for my weight and style. Need to get to that soon.

Quote:
Sharing a few photos from CSS last year. I highly recommend that you take your R1 to track but make sure to have the right tyres and brake upgrades in place. I installed Metzeler RACETEC RR rubber, a Brembo RCS 19 unit, Galfer steel-braided brake lines, Vesrah Super RJL XX Brake Pads and ran Motul RBF 660 high temperature brake fluid and all of these these paid huge dividends on MMRT.

Looking forward to more updates!

Ride safe,
Aaron
Yes, CSS is in cards, Covid has thrown the spanner in the works a lot. Budgets are tight and will be for some time. Slowly but steadily will reach there. I do intend to attend next year. Hopefully, it will be possible.

And did I mention how killer the bike looks in black?! Track fairing gives it a more epic persona too.

Aaron, Those are some very tasty yet functional mods you have mentioned. Do post the complete mod list on your bike here, from what I can see you also have aftermarket rotors and the Racefit full system exhaust too.

Also, I'd love to pick your brain on a few topics regarding the mods done. So I'll get in touch with you via PM.

-------------

Meanwhile, adding 2 pics I took to showcase the hidden titanium piping inside the stock exhaust. Remember when I said the stock end cans seem lighter than the LV pipes? It was a bit tough to the camera angle right but I think should be clear enough.

Titanium Goodness

Review: My Yamaha R1 (WGP 50th Anniversary Edition)-img_1957.jpeg

Review: My Yamaha R1 (WGP 50th Anniversary Edition)-img_1959.jpeg

Cheers
Krishna

Last edited by krishnaprasadgg : 22nd October 2020 at 08:54.
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Old 22nd October 2020, 21:29   #146
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Default Re: Review: My Yamaha R1 (WGP 50th Anniversary Edition)

Quote:
Originally Posted by krishnaprasadgg View Post
Thanks a lot, Aaron.
We practically have the same bike minus the TC I guess. But Boy does your bike look killer in the full black scheme. And that Arai lid is just pure envy . Lovely track pics.
Appreciate it, Krishna
Yes, your bike has Traction Control and DRL which are missing on mine.
I've used several good helmet brands in the past including Shoei, Scorpion, Xlite, HJC, etc. but Arais are just AMAZING. I'll probably never buy anything else again. This is a RX-7V and I also have a Chaser X for regular use on my other bikes.
I got both of these from the UK so it helps if you have family or friends abroad who can carry one back home for you!

Quote:
Originally Posted by krishnaprasadgg View Post
Absolutely no doubt. My first few days with the bike was quite intimidating, even now I don't dare to WOT the bike in any conditions. But the thrill of riding it way below its actual limit itself is exhilarating enough, to be honest. I still have quite a bit to extract from the bike. The suspension setup is not fine-tuned at all for my weight and style. Need to get to that soon.
Setting your suspension correctly is definitely one of the best and cheapest 'mods' you can do. It may involve a lot of trial and error. You just need to have a friend around to assist you with the sag measurements. There are a lot of good videos on YouTube to help with this.
Like you mentioned earlier, losing weight and exercising regularly is the way to go and this will also make a huge difference by bettering your riding experience and will increase your stamina while on track.

Quote:
Originally Posted by krishnaprasadgg View Post
Yes, CSS is in cards, Covid has thrown the spanner in the works a lot. Budgets are tight and will be for some time. Slowly but steadily will reach there. I do intend to attend next year. Hopefully, it will be possible. And did I mention how killer the bike looks in black?! Track fairing gives it a more epic persona too.
Absolutely understandable, CSS is quite a pricey affair. It may also be a good idea to get some track experience on a smaller bike like your CBR 250R first so you can focus on learning the correct techniques first. I initially trained with Apex Racing and later with Atomic Racing before finally getting to CSS. Before riding the R1on track, I did a lot of laps on my Ninja 250R and at one event on a R15 too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by krishnaprasadgg View Post
Aaron, Those are some very tasty yet functional mods you have mentioned. Do post the complete mod list on your bike here, from what I can see you also have aftermarket rotors and the Racefit full system exhaust too.
Yes, I forgot to mention the Galfer rotors! There's a lot of stuff installed and I'll share a list in a future post.

Quote:
Originally Posted by krishnaprasadgg View Post
Also, I'd love to pick your brain on a few topics regarding the mods done. So I'll get in touch with you via PM.
Absolutely! I'd be happy to help if I can.

In some of your earlier posts, I noticed a Tiger 800 XRX and another machine at what I'm assuming to be your home.
Adding a couple of photos from my wedding that may strike a chord

Cheers!
Aaron
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Review: My Yamaha R1 (WGP 50th Anniversary Edition)-29352226_10156369304489461_6264072103136620120_o.jpg  

Review: My Yamaha R1 (WGP 50th Anniversary Edition)-29352303_10156369297969461_4580027012565829604_o.jpg  

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Old 23rd October 2020, 06:35   #147
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Default Re: Review: My Yamaha R1 (WGP 50th Anniversary Edition)

Quote:
Originally Posted by TurboGTR View Post
I've used several good helmet brands in the past including Shoei, Scorpion, Xlite, HJC, etc. but Arais are just AMAZING. I'll probably never buy anything else again. This is a RX-7V and I also have a Chaser X for regular use on my other bikes.
I got both of these from the UK so it helps if you have family or friends abroad who can carry one back home for you!
It's so consistent how every person who owns an Arai always says the exact same thing. They will never buy anything else ever again. What a testimonial to a family-run brand! My dream gear setup for helmets is what you are having right now. I had a golden chance to get one when I went to Germany but alas overspending on a MotoGP weekend in Italy meant I could not make the helmet work. Ah! There's always going to be a second time.

Quote:
Setting your suspension correctly is definitely one of the best and cheapest 'mods' you can do. It may involve a lot of trial and error. You just need to have a friend around to assist you with the sag measurements. There are a lot of good videos on YouTube to help with this.
Yeah, Dave Moss Tuning videos are always a must-watch for me. Need to muster enough confidence to mess about with the suspension. Now as I am getting more and more comfortable working with the bike, it's just a matter of time.

Quote:
Like you mentioned earlier, losing weight and exercising regularly is the way to go and this will also make a huge difference by bettering your riding experience and will increase your stamina while on track.
Well, the weight loss plan is not going exactly to plan I am no more fitting into my riding pants need to do something about that soon before I start riding regularly again.

Quote:
It may also be a good idea to get some track experience on a smaller bike like your CBR 250R first so you can focus on learning the correct techniques first. I initially trained with Apex Racing and later with Atomic Racing before finally getting to CSS. Before riding the R1on track, I did a lot of laps on my Ninja 250R and at one event on a R15 too.
That's the plan. Lot's of street riding techniques needs to be unlearned first. Better to be safe and not bite off more than I can chew.

Quote:
Yes, I forgot to mention the Galfer rotors! There's a lot of stuff installed and I'll share a list in a future post.
Waiting for it. Maybe a few more pics of the bike from all angles too. I just can't get enough of the CP4 era R1 looks.

Quote:
In some of your earlier posts, I noticed a Tiger 800 XRX and another machine at what I'm assuming to be your home.
Yeah, my garage currently is the 2013 CBR250R (been here the longest since 2013), the 2020 Tiger 800XRX, and the R1.

Quote:
Adding a couple of photos from my wedding that may strike a chord
Lovely pics. The whole squad rolling together is such a goosebumps-inducing photo.

Cheers
Krishna
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Old 31st October 2020, 10:35   #148
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Default Re: Review: My Yamaha R1 (WGP 50th Anniversary Edition)

Disclaimer: This might turn out to be a rant post. But I definitely feel there is something to take away from this post for anyone who is on the lookout for buying an SBK. Let me begin then.

It’s been exactly 4 weeks since I rode the R1.

Review: My Yamaha R1 (WGP 50th Anniversary Edition)-img_2056.jpeg

I have had this conflicting thought in my head for quite some time now. Over the past few months, I have felt more and more that taking the R1 out for a spin has started feeling like a chore/errand. At the same time, I have put on so much more miles on the Tiger and my CBR while not having faced this dilemma or feeling like riding the bikes to be a bother at all.

So that raised a couple of questions that I now had to answer.

Was buying the R1 a mistake?
Has the honeymoon phase finished?
Am I done/fed up with this bike?
Should I have gone for an easier to ride bike?

I thought about this long and hard and I got some solid answers for myself.

Was buying the R1 a mistake?

No, buying the R1 was not a mistake and never will be for me, it is one of the best moment in my life, the pride and emotions I had on that day is something I just can’t put into words and that moment is the realization of a dream which still doesn’t feel real. And to me that says a lot. This might sound super cliche and cheesy to people who see bikes/cars as just tools to get from A-B but I am sure most members here who read this get exactly what I mean when I say that I still look back at her every single time without fail after I park the bike and walk away, and that look still gives me goosebumps and the “pinch me” moment is still there.

Has the honeymoon phase finished?

I never really liked the phrase “Has the honeymoon phase finished?” but that doesn’t make it an invalid question and my answer to that question is again a solid and resounding No. I don’t think it has the reasons I stated above is a testimonial to that it still blows my mind to walk up to the garage and see an R1 sitting there. It just doesn’t get old.

Review: My Yamaha R1 (WGP 50th Anniversary Edition)-img_2057.jpeg

Am I fed up with this bike?

I know it might look like that when I said that I am riding the Tiger and the CBR much more than the R1 but the fact is no, I am not fed up at all. In fact, I absolutely love spending time on the bike and working on it myself, and learning more about it each day. I am continuously spending time/effort and money to bring it back to the way it would have looked rolling out of the factory and at the same time even working on making this bike feel like it’s mine, to put my unique touch on it. If I just wanted to get the “owning an SBK” phase out of my system I could have already be done with it. And now more than ever with COVID and financials being tight I am still paying the EMI’s for the bike through my nose and also spending money on buying parts, almost every other week I am placing an order for parts which to be honest I really shouldn’t be doing and my bank balance agrees on this. So Am I fed up with the bike? Nah, if I was fed up this would have not been the case, instead, this bike would have been on a classifieds/Olx ad quite a few months back.

Should I have gone for a much “easier to ride” bike?

Logically? Yes, but then it would have not been my dream bike no? Like I said in the first post of this thread, over the years many bikes had taken the “dream bike” status in my head, but the R1 has always had a special place in my heart. So yeah maybe I should have gone for an easier to ride bike but I am glad that I didn’t and bought my actual dream bike itself.
Yes, the R1 is a pain to ride everyday or in the city, it has too many flaws, the clutch is too hard, it heats up like crazy, throttle response is super choppy, engine braking is very intrusive, you can’t ride in the higher gears at lower speeds like most i4’s can and it demands a very aggressive riding position/fitness level from the rider but I love every second of it, and I put over 4000 km on the bike within the first 3 months of ownership while that is the number of km some people struggle to hit even with years of ownership of bikes like the R1 and I do not mean that as an insult.

Review: My Yamaha R1 (WGP 50th Anniversary Edition)-img_2058.jpeg

But wait, then why am I not riding the bike as much now, after the first 3-4 months, or more importantly why have I mentioned that riding the bike seems like a chore/errand now?

You see I finally realized a few points today when I went out for a short spin.

Location

Location is critical, access to good safe roads where I can ride the R1 suddenly became scarce for me when I moved back to Kerala right before the pandemic set in.
When I was in Bangalore I took it for granted that I was just 2 km away from getting onto the E-City flyover that took me right into NH roads which meant I could enjoy the lovely straight /winding twisty roads of the National highway at my disposal and that meant I did not have to ride around in the city to scratch that itch to ride. That is not the same in my hometown, here for me to be able to get to some proper open roads to enjoy the R1 I have to navigate through quite a bit of broken/bad roads and a huge number of trucks/car/commuters on bikes and scooter before I and the bike can breathe easy. These are roads on which to ride at a pace where the R1 is comfortable means taking a huge risk which I was not ready to do. So naturally, I had to ride more on city roads which would be much more unpleasant.
Now this is not something that I did not know, but something that I did not put in the right context, so it is was only obvious that over time I would start feeling hesitant and ultimately ended up questioning myself if I made a big mistake with the R1 and I am not going to lie it messed me up a bit in my head for a few days

Other bikes to ride

You see I am in the fortunate place to have multiple bikes at my disposal. This is the reason why I got to ride the Tiger and the CBR more. Whenever I had that itch to ride a bit longer I would just decide to take the Tiger or even the CBR at times. It would mean I would get a chance to ride something different and will not have to struggle in traffic as the Tiger and CBR both are very capable of handling it as compared to the R1. SO by not riding the R1 every single time I have no reason to feel guilty about not riding it, instead it makes the times I take out the R1 much more memorable too.

Attention

Now because the R1 is a big, loud, in your face unapologetic bike, it grabs a lot of attention in traffic and makes life hell with people constantly trying to catch up to you and try and block your way whenever possible that you just get mentally and physically tired trying to dodge around this and are just trying to enjoy your ride. While it still happens on open roads it is much safer and you can just disappear at a seconds notice in a safe way if required.

You will have to plan your rides

Yes, unfortunately, this is always going to be the case. You cannot just take your bike and pick a direction and go with this, well, you can but it won’t be so enjoyable.

Right, now you might be thinking, that’s a lot of words but I still don’t get the point of this rant, so, what is your point?

Ok, I’m finally arriving at it. The reason why I said all this is because I know that there are a lot of people who end up selling their dream bikes and settle for something different/less just because of going through a similar phase or even people who are/get discouraged from getting their dream bikes because of thinking or are being told reasons similar to what I have faced/felt recently.

And to them, I implore to not give up just because of this. Do not give up on your dream machine just because it is not easy to ride in cities, you have less access to highway/track nearby, you ride it so less or any such reasons. Instead, plan for scenarios on overcoming these or working around these, plan your rides more carefully, plan your ride time more carefully, keep another smaller or more all-round bike in your garage for any other situations/errand running, and if you are thinking of selling your current/smaller bike to get a bigger one, don’t, instead try and to save up more in order to make it work with keeping your current bike as well. Because if not, you might end up in a situation where you might not use the bike much and start feeling guilty about it and succumb to pressure, and ultimately try and get rid of it and then feel bad afterward.

Nobody gets to say you bought the wrong bike other than you yourself so try and avoid pouting yourself in that spot. So for me, today’s short spin with the R1 has been quite an eye-opening experience, I hope this helps at least one person who happens to read this.

Review: My Yamaha R1 (WGP 50th Anniversary Edition)-img_2060.jpeg

Review: My Yamaha R1 (WGP 50th Anniversary Edition)-img_2061.jpeg

Well, that's about the end of the rant.
IF you made it this far then job well done I guess. Not many can sit through my rants and thoughts. Few members here already know that


Cheers
Krishna
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Old 2nd November 2020, 08:42   #149
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Default Re: Review: My Yamaha R1 (WGP 50th Anniversary Edition)

You win some you lose some. And this week I lost.

My Sunday DIY turned out to be a failure.

So If you remember I had mentioned that I have a pretty irritating Neural light malfunction with this bike wherein the bike during relatively operational temperature does not show the neutral sign even when the bike is in neutral but works perfectly fine when the operating temperature is lesser than 80 degrees C.

Something like this

Neutral light showing while in neutral

Review: My Yamaha R1 (WGP 50th Anniversary Edition)-img_2028.jpeg

Neutral light not showing while in neutral
Review: My Yamaha R1 (WGP 50th Anniversary Edition)-img_2061.jpeg

Now, this issue in no way affects the working of the bike other than the fact that I cannot put the bike on the side stand with the engine running or start up the bike without depressing the clutch when the engine is hot. Which gets pretty irritating when on longer rides.

Anyways, I was reading through the factory manual on Saturday evening (as you do ) and came across the troubleshooting section to check the working of the gear position sensor.

Looked like a pretty straightforward job and some more forum deep diving and a lot of people seemed to have got rid of similar GPS issues by just cleaning the sensor and fitting it back. So decided to give it a try on Sunday.

So let's get to it.

Tools required
  1. 10mm ring spanner
  2. 5mm allen key
  3. 4mm allen key

So the sensor sits about directly behind the shit linkage input shaft. So the first thing that needs to come off is the shift linkage. Before you go about removing this it is advised to make a marking on the input shaft and the linkage arm to make sure that you get your shifter position in the same place as it was before the removal, if you don't then you will have to spend some time to get it back to the position you are comfortable with.

Make a mark using as shown to get the alignment spot on when fixing back

Review: My Yamaha R1 (WGP 50th Anniversary Edition)-img_2066.jpeg

To help do the marking use a pencil or a whiteboard marker and mark a line on both the input shaft and the linkage arm so that you can get it aligned back on reinstall and you are ready to go.

Use the 10mm ring spanner to loosen the pinch bolt and the linkage arm just slides out and move it out of the way.

Slides out easily. Leave the bolt on there to make sure you don't lose it.

Review: My Yamaha R1 (WGP 50th Anniversary Edition)-img_2067.jpeg

Next using the 5mm Allen remove the front sprocket cover. There are 3 bolts holding it securely in place and take a bit of finagling to get it off as it's a bit tightly packed in there.

You can see the 2 bolts on the top and bottom, the 3rd bolt is behind those overflow drain pipes and tough to see/ capture on camera

Review: My Yamaha R1 (WGP 50th Anniversary Edition)-img_2068.jpeg


Review: My Yamaha R1 (WGP 50th Anniversary Edition)-img_2069.jpeg


Now there is one more rubber bushing/dampener on there that needs to come off to get access to the GPS sensor, this part just slides out relatively easy.

Notice the 3rd bolt hole now that the sprocket cover has come off. Now to remove the rubber dampener. It just slides off effortlessly

Review: My Yamaha R1 (WGP 50th Anniversary Edition)-img_2070.jpeg

Note the amount of filth and gunk that has accumulated. So get ready for a before and after shot

Before
Review: My Yamaha R1 (WGP 50th Anniversary Edition)-img_2072.jpeg

After
Review: My Yamaha R1 (WGP 50th Anniversary Edition)-img_2079.jpeg

So back to the topic. Now that we have full access to the one end of the GPS sensor. Now we have to use a 4mm Allen key/t handle to crack those 2 bolts loose. Even though it is held on with just 4nm of torque it is in there with thread locker from factory and blue threadlocker at that so takes a bit of effort that you'd think to get it cracked open.

Review: My Yamaha R1 (WGP 50th Anniversary Edition)-img_2074.jpeg



Opened
Review: My Yamaha R1 (WGP 50th Anniversary Edition)-img_2075.jpeg

So to put it in layman terms how a GPS works are the small nipple(holds a small voltage charge) that you see there is part of what can be called as a GPS roller which changes position based on the gear in which the bike is slotted in. And based on its position it makes contact with the actual sensor(pic below) and completes the circuit and the charge is sent to the relevant wires which is connected to the wiring loom and the information from this is used for any purpose by the ECU. For eg. To allow the bike to start w or w/o the clutch depressed, to cut off the engine or not when the side stand is activated, so on and so forth.

The contact points. Each point denotes a particular gear Neutral is the smallest circle and in an anti-clockwise direction, it denotes gear 1 through 6

Review: My Yamaha R1 (WGP 50th Anniversary Edition)-img_2077.jpeg

So based on the position of the contact pin making contact with these copper contacts it sends a voltage charge to the wires at the end of the sensor and the ECU knows which gear the bike is in.

So usually what happens is there could be a miss-contact happening because of dirt/gunk or any other reason which blocks the signal and the gear is not read on the dash/ECU and a proper clean usually fixes the issue. here the sensor had a bit of dirt on the 'N' contact point it and I cleaned it off (forgot to take a pic of the dirt on it).

The mating surface of the sensor also was a bit dirty (refer to the pics above) so I cleaned it up as well and everything else looked good. Now I was pretty confident that the issue would be over since there was a bit of dirt on it and could have been the potential problem.

So I got back to installing it back. Mind you the torque spec on these are just 4 Nm so you need to be very careful as to not over-torque them. Just finger tight with a little bit of torque should do the trick.

and I reinstalled everything other than the sprocket cover back and switched the ignition on and thankfully the 'N' light was on, so I did not break anything in the process. Took the bike for a test ride to get the operating temp a bit high and at about 98 degrees heat I slotted it into N and the N light was working, so I thought to myself that the problem is sorted but alas just a second later the light went away.

So now we are back to square one. The next step is to inspect the other end of the sensor that connects to the wiring loom. But I decided not to do that today as the bike was now heated up and the wires connect to the loom below the fuel tank and that area gets insanely heated up so decided to try that another day. I do not have much hope for that anyway. Looks like a GPS sensor replacement is what will sort this issue out.
I had read about a lot of people who had to end up replacing this to sort the issue, but hey it was worth a try.

Now, this is where any inputs would be highly appreciated.
The manual suggests checking continuity and if there is no continuity at any point just replace the sensor.

Review: My Yamaha R1 (WGP 50th Anniversary Edition)-screenshot-20201101-6.53.17-pm.png

Now in my case, it wouldn't have been straight out continuity problem because obviously there is continuity for 'N' as it works when the bike is cold. It only loses continuity when it's hot. I thought it was because of some gunk or something else blocking the contact point which there was gunk but as it turns out wasn't the issue or not entirely the issue. So that begs the question what could have been the issue? Any inputs?


Meanwhile added a new item to my tools and cleaners arsenal. The STP heavy duty brake parts cleaner. They are available on Amazon and is a great product to use as well.

Review: My Yamaha R1 (WGP 50th Anniversary Edition)-17a811cd244a4b0caca9cbbab660d70d.jpeg

I have a proper Caliper rebuild coming up on my CBR and all the parts required(pistons, o rings, sliding caliper boots) have been acquired. Will be using this on that. Hopefully will post a detailed DIY thread on that.

Cheers
Krishna
krishnaprasadgg is offline   (11) Thanks
Old 2nd November 2020, 10:43   #150
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Default Re: Review: My Yamaha R1 (WGP 50th Anniversary Edition)

Quote:
Originally Posted by krishnaprasadgg View Post
And to them, I implore to not give up just because of this. Do not give up on your dream machine just because it is not easy to ride in cities, you have less access to highway/track nearby, you ride it so less or any such reasons. Instead, plan for scenarios on overcoming these or working around these, plan your rides more carefully, plan your ride time more carefully, keep another smaller or more all-round bike in your garage for any other situations/errand running, and if you are thinking of selling your current/smaller bike to get a bigger one, don’t, instead try and to save up more in order to make it work with keeping your current bike as well. Because if not, you might end up in a situation where you might not use the bike much and start feeling guilty about it and succumb to pressure, and ultimately try and get rid of it and then feel bad afterward.
That was very nicely written, krishnaprasadgg. I can totally relate to everything that you said, even though my Triumph puts out half the power that your R1 does. Having a second, more usable two wheeler in the garage is a very sensible piece of advice, it doesnt matter if it is a scooter or a 250cc tourer, the second two wheeler will make running around town for errands completely tension free while the bigger bike can be taken out for more calculated rides.

P.S - one more way to avoid buyers remorse is to not ride a more comfortable big bike than the one that you already have. You have a Tiger 800 to ride, so you get to notice the difference between the R1 and the Tiger extremely often. I got the keys to a Tiger 900, and after a day of riding it, I hopped back onto my Street Triple and felt like I was riding a Daytona
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