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Old 11th August 2016, 11:17   #1366
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Default Re: Tools for a DIYer

Quote:
Originally Posted by lapis_lazuli View Post
, .

Thanks Ray Saheb. The Moglix site is a new one for me!

On the other hand, I need the extender rod as well (Tommy?). I don't have a 1/2 drive set (or the extender).

However, I found this:

http://www.ebay.in/itm/16MM-Spanner-.../291565196235?

But not too sure of the reach would be enough. Need to remove the air box and verify how deep down, the plug sits. May be will buy one such.

Ideal would be the ones listed for almost 2500 on amazon India, the proper
spark plug tool. But that is TOO high a price. Silly price actually. I am too lethargic to visit Chawri or Kashmere gate.
You could also go to Chawri Bazar hand tools market (Between Ajmeri Gate and the Metro Station). There you will find a variety of hand tools
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Old 16th August 2016, 19:02   #1367
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fine69 View Post
Is there a substitute to using Torque wrench? I need to fit some heavy duty hook eye anchor bolts on the walls and realized that they require specific torque to be applied to these bolts. I don't really want to buy a torque wrench costing 10k so looking for an alternative here.

While we are on the topic, I have never seen any of the carpenters using torque wrench when using anchor bolts, they tighten them with all their might and the bolt tends to hang on to stuff pretty well too. In fact I have a pull-up bar hanging from anchor bolts which the carpenter had tightened using a regular adjustable spanner, no torque measurement considered at all.
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Originally Posted by ajitkommini View Post
Is there some place that offers high value tools like this on rent? The local hardware guy near my place has a collection of large drills, demolition hammers etc. displayed outside the store that he gives out on a rental basis. There might be some similar service for precision tools as well.
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Originally Posted by Aroy View Post
How much torque is specified? Normally tightening fully (10-12mm dia bolt) with 300mm long arm of the wrench does the job for most masonry jobs. Torque ratings are given for critical fastener. Just enough to tighten them but not enough to break the bolt. In general the "just enough" stretches the bolt a tiny bit, so it is not to be used a second time
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeroen View Post
You can make your own Torque wrench, have a look:

http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/to...le-d_1909.html

Not sure why the carpenters donít use them, maybe they havent got them, or they donít know what specific torque needs to be applied? Or they havenít got a clue why you would need to torque. But then again, I have seen a number of houses and apartments collapsing in India over the last year. So somebody got something wrong or forgot something!

Jeroen
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Originally Posted by Thad E Ginathom View Post
I never heard of torque wrenches being used outside of mechanics!

Perhaps, though, where lives may depend on a bolt (eg lift-shaft fittings or building safety-harness points) it might be necessary for the manufacturers to state such a thing.

My bet is that they want to prevent overtightening, as many installers would go for this "all their might" approach. I see plumbers doing the same thing with screw-thread steel pipes.
Quote:
Originally Posted by fine69 View Post
http://www.boun.in/Anchore7ba.html?T...d%29%20Anchors

Are you saying that if I normally tighten it enough, it should be ok. I don't mean to use it ever again, just put it and forget it.

Or would using too much of strength defeat the purpose of the anchor bolt?

EDIT: My objective is to put these bolts (in the link) in the wall so that they don't come out even if I try to pull them out with all my strength. I will be using them for a workout.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aroy View Post
See the posts above, which give a method of measuring the torque and in your case getting the right torque for tightening the bolt.

If it is a 10mm or 12mm bolt, tightening with all your strength will be fine (it is difficult to break the bolt), for thinner bolt you may break it by over tightening.

In my experience, anchor bolts in the wall need tightening enough to prevent their working loose with vibration, but you have to be sure that the hole in the wall is not only the proper diameter, but the wall material should be solid brick/concrete, not plaster or material which will crumble. All our geysers (20L and 30L) models are secured using 8mm bolts, tightened till they are firmly embedded.

Anchor bolts expand as you tighten them, so once fully tightened you can not pull them out, unless the wall material crumbles.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeroen View Post
Torque wrenches are (or should be) used in all sorts of application and or industries. Other then car mechanics, marine/naval engineers uses them on a vast array of different equipement, they are used in the aviation industry.

They are used in the telecom industry, certain (fiber) connectors need to be torque-ed properly.

People who put up the likes of ferris wheels and such use them.

Lots of bits and pieces on many industrial plants require torque wrenches. E.g. think of pressure vessels.

We often think of torque wrenches as putting a lot of torque on a bolt/nut. But itís about getting the exact correct amount. The torque that is needed to properly install a simple fiber connector is very small. A six year old has enough strength. But the trick is to get it exact right so the fiber doesnít deform, but itís still tight enough to ensure a water tight seal.

Watch makers use torque wrenches! The list is endless.

If you want some of the basics behind torque, have a look at this:

Way past the DIY stage, but here is the sort of stuff we used on the big marine Diesels etc. This (hydraulic) tool actually stretches the bolt without twisting (torquing) it. Very precise loading of the bolts!

Enjoy, Jeroen
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thad E Ginathom View Post
Yes, like I said: mechanics. I never limited that to cars! But no matter: nice examples

The last torque wrench I came close to was in the hands of my dentist: he was getting the torque on an implant right.
Can you guys give pointers on good Torque Wrenches available here but not too expensive? I could find mostly Taparia and Ambika? Which of these would you recommend?

I need something that covers the range starting from 7 NM up to 300 NM. I think this will need to be broken into two wrenches (14-68 & 70-340)?

Oh and continuing on that topic.

Do some of you guys think these old beam or deflection type wrenches still have their uses?

Might I say they are much cheaper and could be something very usefull for a DIYer.

http://www.aliexpress.com/item/whole...6-6d6f8cab5db7

I admit on this particular chinese one the markings are not so very precise but for a DIYer who does oil pan nuts, drain nuts, wheel lugs, head cover bolts...is something like this close enough?

Last edited by Gannu_1 : 16th August 2016 at 19:38. Reason: Back to back posts merged. Please edit your previous post within the 30 minute window to add more contents to it. Thanks!
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Old 16th August 2016, 19:59   #1368
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Default Re: Tools for a DIYer

Unless you are using torque wrench for mechanical fastening like crankshaft or engine head bolts where specific torque is required to prevent the fasteners becoming loose, a beam type wrench is good enough, provided you can monitor the pointer properly.

The ratchet type wrenches are generally used in a professional or production environment where ease of use, accuracy and time are more important than the cost of the wrench.

I prefer Taparia, as I have no knowledge of Ambika brand.

Last edited by Aroy : 16th August 2016 at 20:00.
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Old 16th August 2016, 20:16   #1369
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Default Re: Tools for a DIYer

If you can always see the pointer on the beam type torque wrench while you are working with it then you can go for it. Sometimes based on angle/position you will be working on you may not be able to read the pointer, for thise use the click type torque wrench and go by the sound.
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Old 16th August 2016, 22:51   #1370
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Default Re: Tools for a DIYer

Quote:
Originally Posted by BowMan View Post
Can you guys give pointers on good Torque Wrenches available here but not too expensive? I could find mostly Taparia and Ambika? Which of these would you recommend?
I've never owned one. I've never actually taken an engine apart, and I doubt very much if I'd succeed in reassembling it if I did <Blush>
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Old 17th August 2016, 13:03   #1371
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Default Re: Tools for a DIYer

I have a bosch drill set and got few drill bits in the kit for Concrete metal and wood.

Two of the concrete drill bits have tips worn off after little usage.

Is there an easy method to sharpen the drill bit using some hand tool such as emery stone ? I searched on web but instructibles and other sites mention few tools to keep the angle at 59 deg and use of grinding wheel.

Or alternatively is there any place in Bangalore where I can get my drill bits sharpened ?

I am sorry if this is a repeated query but I could not find specific info after little search.
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Old 17th August 2016, 13:35   #1372
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Default Re: Tools for a DIYer

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Originally Posted by amitk26 View Post
I have a bosch drill set and got few drill bits in the kit for Concrete metal and wood.

Two of the concrete drill bits have tips worn off after little usage.

Or alternatively is there any place in Bangalore where I can get my drill bits sharpened ?
Why dont you just buy a new bit instead of sharpening the old one? In hardware shops you can get new drill bits for less than 50 a piece. So you can replace bits as and when they wear out. I have got many new bits after the old ones got blunt or broke.
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Old 7th September 2016, 14:51   #1373
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Guys,
I am thinking of buying the following for light home DIY:

1) DeWalt DCD771C2 cordless drill
https://www.amazon.in/gp/aw/d/B00ZLN...=AYFUN65GEX883

2) Bosch 73-piece drill bit set
https://www.amazon.in/gp/aw/d/B00NNX...28KTSNY29X7MQ#

How will these work together, and are they worth buying?

If not, what are your suggestions for a maximum budget of 20K?
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Old 7th September 2016, 15:28   #1374
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Default Re: Tools for a DIYer

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Originally Posted by pillainp View Post
Guys,
I am thinking of buying the following for light home DIY:
1) DeWalt DCD771C2 cordless drill
2) Bosch 73-piece drill bit set.
How will these work together, and are they worth buying? If not, what are your suggestions for a maximum budget of 20K?
If you are buying for HOME use the buy any CORDED drill machine within 2K.

I would recommend Black & Decker OR SKIL, both make good machines.
I use B&D for light to heavy duty work and has had no complaints in last 4 years and I do use it every weekend for my woodworking and concrete projects.

Drill set again is up to your choice. The most common sizes used in homes are 04-10 MM. Pls be informed that there are separate types of bits for common drilling & concrete drilling (06-12 mm is idea size for home).
If anything to do with wall hangings, do buy plastic plugs (different sizes) also.

You can acquire all above for less than 5k.

Regards-Sonu
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Old 7th September 2016, 16:10   #1375
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pillainp View Post

1) DeWalt DCD771C2 cordless drill
https://www.amazon.in/gp/aw/d/B00ZLN...=AYFUN65GEX883


If not, what are your suggestions for a maximum budget of 20K?
Dewalt DCD771 is a very old model and spending 10k+ on this model is not worth the amount. They launched the brushless motor models a few years ago and dcd786, 796 are the latest models. The previous gen 785,795 are being sold at mouth watering prices in EU and US.
And secondly, dewalt has pathetic service in India. Better stick to Bosch or a corded drill. Not sure if Bosch has launched their 18v cordless drill in India. Bosch sells almost all spare parts for its tools through their service centers in Bangalore. You can buy the parts and repair most of the tools by yourselves. This is one of the best things of owning a Bosch tool.
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Old 7th September 2016, 16:43   #1376
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Default Re: Tools for a DIYer

Can someone here give me a full listing of all the parts/tools in this roll please? And i am looking for something similar to carry on my motorbike with me - any suggestions on what to get where?
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Old 8th September 2016, 19:08   #1377
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So then:

Per advice above, have decided to go with a corded drill.

What is the difference between the Bosch GSB 13 RE and the Bosch GSB 600 RE?

Which is better?
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Old 8th September 2016, 19:15   #1378
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Default Re: Tools for a DIYer

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Originally Posted by pillainp View Post
So then:

Per advice above, have decided to go with a corded drill.

What is the difference between the Bosch GSB 13 RE and the Bosch GSB 600 RE?

Which is better?
AFAIK 13RE is only the drill. 600RE is the total kit.
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Old 8th September 2016, 19:18   #1379
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But there is GSB 13 RE Smart kit and a 600 RE kit

Also what are your thoughts regarding the GSB/GSR 1080-2-LI? Which is better?

I need a light cordless drill/driver anyway, which was why I was thinking of the DeWalt DCD771 C2.

Last edited by pillainp : 8th September 2016 at 19:20.
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Old 9th September 2016, 16:34   #1380
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Originally Posted by pillainp View Post
But there is GSB 13 RE Smart kit and a 600 RE kit

Also what are your thoughts regarding the GSB/GSR 1080-2-LI? Which is better?

I need a light cordless drill/driver anyway, which was why I was thinking of the DeWalt DCD771 C2.
GSB 13 RE and 600 RE should be the same. 600 RE might include different set if tools, but the drill remains the same.

GSB 10.8 has hammering function while GSR 10.8 do not have hammer function. As long as you dont plan on drilling concrete with these cordless, GSB/R 10.8 is a good tool for light use.
I have been using a similar Milwaukee M12 drill for the past 2 years and is really happy with its light weight. I never had to pull my hammer drill other than for concrete.
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