Team-BHP > Shifting gears > Gadgets, Computers & Software


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 29th August 2019, 09:43   #1396
BHPian
 
Prowler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Madras
Posts: 623
Thanked: 546 Times
Default Re: Inverter Batteries

Quote:
Originally Posted by ghodlur View Post
1) The battery is not being charged, I assume this needs replacement as battery is more than 5 yrs old.
2) With the Microtek inverter unit, there is no indication of the mains On. According to the technician, for the indication to be ON the battery has to have some charge. Is this correct?
Battery age alone doesn't determine whether the battery is 'alive' or not. Turn off the power and connect a headlight bulb (at least 55 W). If the bulb lights up normally, your problem is elsewhere. But if there is no light, replace your battery.
Prowler is offline  
Old 29th August 2019, 09:57   #1397
Senior - BHPian
 
ghodlur's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Thane
Posts: 5,431
Thanked: 2,822 Times
Default Re: Inverter Batteries

Quote:
Originally Posted by Prowler View Post
Battery age alone doesn't determine whether the battery is 'alive' or not. Turn off the power and connect a headlight bulb (at least 55 W). If the bulb lights up normally, your problem is elsewhere. But if there is no light, replace your battery.
Thanks mate.
That light check was done by the technician, he said the battery life is done. During the last 6 monthly checks, he had observed heating of the battery and a bulge on one side. Because of that reason, the battery was disconnected.

I guess changing the battery will be the only option now. Any suggestions from experts?
ghodlur is offline  
Old 30th August 2019, 00:49   #1398
BHPian
 
suzuki san's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Goa & Bombay
Posts: 631
Thanked: 489 Times
Default Re: Inverter Batteries

Quote:
Originally Posted by ghodlur View Post
A couple of issues with Inverter setup at my parents place.
1) The battery is not being charged, I assume this needs replacement as battery is more than 5 yrs old.
2) With the Microtek inverter unit, there is no indication of the mains On. According to the technician, for the indication to be ON the battery has to have some charge. Is this correct?
Hi Ghodlur,
On a normal Microtek invertor, running on mains power, there will be two green lights (steady) on the front panel.
In the event of a power failure, the invertor switches over to battery power and only one green light (steady) will show on the front panel. You will also usually get a high pitched whistling/screeching type of noise while on battery power.
Once the main power comes back on, the right hand side green light will start flashing to indicate battery is being charged. The left side green light stays on and steady.
Depending on how long the power was off and your battery condition, this light could stay flashing for up to 2 or 3 hours - or more.
In the event your power fails and your battery is old/dead/damaged, there will be an alarm (high pitched buzz), a red light will come on on your front panel and the invertor will shut down completely.
If the body of the battery is bulging, it's a bad sign. Usually means you have not kept it properly topped up with distilled water and the plates have buckled inside. Time to change the battery.
Hope this helps.
Regards,
SS
suzuki san is offline  
Old 15th October 2019, 18:59   #1399
Distinguished - BHPian
 
R2D2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Pune
Posts: 2,948
Thanked: 4,377 Times
Default Re: Inverter Batteries

During the quarterly DW top up, I realised one of my 6.5 year old 200 AH Exide batteries is showing signs of aging. The presence of dark sludge (looks like used engine oil) floating on the electrolyte or coating the floats/vent caps is a sign of the +ve plate deteriorating and losing lead dioxide. The count down to replacement has begun. I hope they last me at least another 6-12 months. Frankly Exide inverter batteries are excellent but prices are up by about 30% compared to what I paid for the current set back in Apr 2013.
R2D2 is offline  
Old 21st October 2019, 12:53   #1400
BHPian
 
Thilak29's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: KL 14 / KA 05
Posts: 704
Thanked: 1,828 Times
Default Re: Inverter Batteries

Help!

This rainy season saw three burnouts among inverters (one standby and both Luminous branded). Are these devices highly prone to voltage surges? I have got the safety net of good earthing, fuse and MCBs and no other electric equipment took hit. I ponder what is wrong with inverter boards, will adding surge protector help?
Thilak29 is offline  
Old 21st October 2019, 14:07   #1401
BHPian
 
Prowler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Madras
Posts: 623
Thanked: 546 Times
Default Re: Inverter Batteries

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thilak29 View Post
Help!

This rainy season saw three burnouts among inverters (one standby and both Luminous branded). Are these devices highly prone to voltage surges? I have got the safety net of good earthing, fuse and MCBs and no other electric equipment took hit. I ponder what is wrong with inverter boards, will adding surge protector help?
It will surely help. Fuse/MCB will not protect against high voltage transients. A simple MOV (metal oxide varistor) wired in parallel before the inverter and fed through a MCB will save your electronics. But a full size Mains SPD will protect the entire house. We have been writing about them in this thread for a long time.
Prowler is offline  
Old 26th October 2019, 13:07   #1402
Newbie
 
kontinuity's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Pune
Posts: 11
Thanked: 15 Times
Default Re: Inverter Batteries

Hi guys,

Been looking for a replacement for my aged AutoBat 180ah battery. Got quoted the below 3:

(includes 2k for old battery)
* Exide Inva Tubular 200ah - 15000 (3 yr warranty)
* Luminous 200ah - 14000 (3 yr warranty)
* Murphy Battery 220ah - 8000 (5 yr warranty)

This is in Pune. Any ideas if this is reasonable?

Thanks!
kontinuity is offline  
Old 27th October 2019, 12:12   #1403
BHPian
 
suzuki san's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Goa & Bombay
Posts: 631
Thanked: 489 Times
Default Re: Inverter Batteries

Hi Guys,

Does anyone know what the ratings C10 and C20 mean w.r.t. Inverter Batteries? I have been given to understand that C10 is industrial grade and gives better back up. Also more expensive. Can anyone confirm this?

Is anyone using "Exide" Solar Blitz Tubular batteries and, if so, your feedback please.

Thanks & Regards,
SS
suzuki san is offline   (1) Thanks
Old 27th October 2019, 13:48   #1404
Distinguished - BHPian
 
Thad E Ginathom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Chennai
Posts: 9,396
Thanked: 14,705 Times
Default Re: Inverter Batteries

I'm half guessing... But lead-acid batteries hate being fully discharged, which, in, say, a car, should never happen. Batteries made for inverters need to cope with occasional full discharge. Is the rating to do with this?

Awaiting marks out of ten for my answer from the experts
Thad E Ginathom is online now  
Old 27th October 2019, 17:19   #1405
Distinguished - BHPian
 
R2D2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Pune
Posts: 2,948
Thanked: 4,377 Times
Default Re: Inverter Batteries

Quote:
Originally Posted by suzuki san View Post
Does anyone know what the ratings C10 and C20 mean w.r.t. Inverter Batteries? I have been given to understand that C10 is industrial grade and gives better back up. Also more expensive. Can anyone confirm this?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thad E Ginathom View Post
I'm half guessing... But lead-acid batteries hate being fully discharged, which, in, say, a car, should never happen. Batteries made for inverters need to cope with occasional full discharge. Is the rating to do with this?
What the C10 and C20 means is the discharge rate i.e. 'X' Amps in 10 hours or 20 hour rate. So technically a C10 is better than a C20 because it can handle a faster discharge rate.

E.g. a 200 AH C20 battery can discharge 10 Amps/hour for 20 hours while a 200 AH C10 battery will handle 20A/hour for 10 hours. For home use C20 is fine.

And yes, batteries do not like to be completely discharged even deep discharge types can handle upto a max of 80% depth of discharge while with car batteries don't like anything less than 20%. Check the battery specs for the exact discharge rate C10/C20 and other technical characteristics including # of discharge cycles (life).
R2D2 is offline   (1) Thanks
Old 27th October 2019, 17:43   #1406
Distinguished - BHPian
 
Thad E Ginathom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Chennai
Posts: 9,396
Thanked: 14,705 Times
Default Re: Inverter Batteries

Thanks, R2D2. Zero out of ten for me because I answered the wrong question!
Thad E Ginathom is online now  
Old 28th October 2019, 00:07   #1407
BHPian
 
suzuki san's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Goa & Bombay
Posts: 631
Thanked: 489 Times
Default Re: Inverter Batteries

Quote:
Originally Posted by R2D2 View Post

And yes, batteries do not like to be completely discharged even deep discharge types can handle upto a max of 80% depth of discharge while with car batteries don't like anything less than 20%. Check the battery specs for the exact discharge rate C10/C20 and other technical characteristics including # of discharge cycles (life).
Thanks R2D2,

Useful info indeed.

So how does one avoid complete discharging of a battery? If, for example, the power fails in the middle of the night and the inverter cuts in, how is one supposed to guess when the battery will get completely discharged? Right now with the new inverter I have bought, it does give me the "DTE" but this is not the case on most normal inverters. In the event that the battery does get fully discharged, what can one do to prevent damage to the battery?

Regards,
SS
suzuki san is offline   (1) Thanks
Old 28th October 2019, 09:23   #1408
Distinguished - BHPian
 
R2D2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Pune
Posts: 2,948
Thanked: 4,377 Times
Default Re: Inverter Batteries

Quote:
Originally Posted by suzuki san View Post
So how does one avoid complete discharging of a battery? If, for example, the power fails in the middle of the night and the inverter cuts in, how is one supposed to guess when the battery will get completely discharged? Right now with the new inverter I have bought, it does give me the "DTE" but this is not the case on most normal inverters. In the event that the battery does get fully discharged, what can one do to prevent damage to the battery?
Normally an inverter will sound an alarm to indicate battery voltage is low (discharged) and should the load not be reduced or disconnected manually the inverter will automatically shut off the AC output to preserve the battery and its own circuitry. The voltage at which an inverter does an auto shut off varies from model to model so you need to check the instructions or ask the dealer.

That said, deep discharges are best avoided because they have a detrimental impact on the battery life. Even with tubular models try not to go below 50% SoC. Either reduce load in the home or buy a larger battery if your current models run down too soon. Our former 150 AH lasted us nearly 2 days when there was a blackout due to a damaged high voltage cable. Hence upgraded to 200 AH the next time, which I reckon will last me at least 2.5-3 days with minimal load.

To prevent lasting damage to batteries that are dead or have been drained below 80% SOC make sure they are charged back to 100% ASAP. Also remember the inverter takes quite a bit of power, to fully charge them again. And float charge also consumes power. My inverter is responsible for a hefty %age of my power bill. The more the # of batteries and the larger they are the more power your inverter consumes to charge and maintain them.

But TWO most important things for enhanced battery life are; adding distilled water in time AND checking charging voltage. Please ensure voltage is checked and water replenished regularly.

Last edited by R2D2 : 28th October 2019 at 09:24.
R2D2 is offline   (1) Thanks
Old 28th October 2019, 13:13   #1409
BHPian
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Bangalore
Posts: 493
Thanked: 605 Times
Default Re: Inverter Batteries

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thad E Ginathom View Post
Thanks, R2D2. Zero out of ten for me because I answered the wrong question!
Not all marks lost Thad. You did score points.
All batteries are rated for 1C which means a 150Ah battery will be capable of delivering 150A for ~1 Hr. A 200Ah is capable of delivering 200A for 1 Hr.
However, the C rating specifies the safe discharge/charge rate for the battery.
So a C20 battery is safe to be discharged in 20 hours, and if you try to discharge it in 10 hours, the battery life will be affected. Try doing it 1 hour, your battery is permanently damaged.

The same goes for the charge rate. A 200Ah battery rated for C10 charging can be safely charged at 20Amps. C5 rated battery can be charged at 40A and you can get your battery charged in 5 hours. This doesn't mean that the battery cant be charged at a higher rate, but you do that at the risk of damaging the battery or its life.

The charge rate is more important for solar applications while discharge rate is important for UPS applications. In solar applications, You would ideally want a battery which can be fully charged in a days 5Hrs of sun light. So batteries with C5 charge rate is preferred for off grid solar applications.
Holyghost is offline   (1) Thanks
Old 28th October 2019, 15:05   #1410
Distinguished - BHPian
 
Thad E Ginathom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Chennai
Posts: 9,396
Thanked: 14,705 Times
Default Re: Inverter Batteries

Thanks for the marks! And for the further explanation
Thad E Ginathom is online now  
Reply

Most Viewed
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Copyright 2000 - 2020, Team-BHP.com
Proudly powered by E2E Networks