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Old 13th March 2023, 18:21   #3841
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Re: Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin

Fuel efficiency on the twins depends quite a bit on the right hand. Even in city, if it is gentle riding, 25 kmpl is what I get. On the highway, most of the time I get around 30 kmpl with 32 being the highest. Windblast also affects it.
I hardly open the throttle more than 50%. One can say, I under utilize the engine, probably because I am used to riding a bike that doesn't need much revs, all these years.
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Old 13th March 2023, 20:57   #3842
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Re: Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin

Almost similar riding route, Noida expressway to south Delhi, I regularly get 24-26 kmpl. Even with slightly fast riding.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bsenroy View Post
I guess it also depends on traffic conditions, riding style etc.
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Old 14th March 2023, 10:19   #3843
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Re: Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin

Quote:
Originally Posted by tharian View Post
Fuel efficiency on the twins depends quite a bit on the right hand. Even in city, if it is gentle riding, 25 kmpl is what I get. On the highway, most of the time I get around 30 kmpl with 32 being the highest.
Similar story here. On my previous ride (rental bike which is run 60k+ kms) with 10% mild city (Bengaluru) traffic + 90% highway with rpm hovering around 3000-3200, I got 31.5 kmpl.
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Old 16th March 2023, 12:08   #3844
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Re: Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin

Quote:
I prefer sticking to the tarmac, but would love to explore the hidden roads. Would someday want to learn the art of riding trails/offroads. (can the INT 650 be modified as an off-roader?)
I see that you have already purchased the interceptor.

Coming to your question - Can the interceptor be modified as an off-roader? Lets see...

Some years back, i was under the same dilemma. I had bought an interceptor and i always desired it to be a bit more versatile. My other bikes being 310GS and Xpulse, my riding style was tuned accordingly, for eg, raising butt and riding over broken patches, where interceptor in stock had its share of limitations. Over time, i have managed to make some mods which have helped my cause. will try and share them here just incase they are helpful to others.

SUSPENSION: The biggest pain point of interceptor is its stock suspension. It does ok on good roads, but take it on bad broken roads and once can feel smallest of undulation, esp if one is spoilt by long travel suspension of bikes like xpulse/GS. Imported suspension upgrades like YSS / OHLINS are very expensive and are more tuned towards precision in handling and less on comfort. We tried playing around with the front suspension with Himalayan springs, suspension oil of various grades, spacer lengths etc and finally settled with front suspension kit from way-2-speed. This kit comprises of preload adjuster, new set of longer springs with variable compression, thicker oil, 15mm spacer to increase suspension travel. The kit did help with improving the front suspension as well as raising the front end, increasing the ground clearance. But that was job only half done, as there was nothing much available for the rear suspension for a reasonable price. Until recently where a friend experimented with swapping suspension from CB350 on his interceptor. I rode his bike, liked it and went for the same (think i had posted about this some months back). Now with the rear suspension from the CB350, and the front from Kit from way-2-speed, the bike is much more comfortable over bad - broken roads and ends my hunt for suspension upgrade.

ERGONOMICS: 2nd major issue i had with interceptor was riding geometry / ergonomics esp while standing and riding trails. Many experiments were tried over time with various handlebars, risers, seat mods, pegs etc. Now the bike feels as comfortable and upright as a GS while sitting or saddling. The setup is a 2" pivot riser + a taller pull-back handlebar and lowering of foot peg position by 40 mm. Lowering of foot-peg was a bit challenging where i fabricated the new setup taking Himalayan pegs as base and making brackets etc. Been a couple of years and touch-wood, its all been holding good. A flat and wider seat with forward slope reduced also helps. I feel there is some more scope to further improve on the seat for all day riding comfort.

WEIGHT: is a big issue if one is riding off the road. AEW exhaust helped me shed 6-7 kgs. I could clearly make out the difference when i installed them first. Bike felt much lighter and flick-able. I have also not installed too many heavy accessories like saddle stays etc, which helps keep the weight in check.

TYRES: i have converted the tyre setup to Tubeless and have been using Timsun tubeless dual sport tyres. They are good for on road as well as on trails. Taller tyre profile also helps with further bumping the GC.

OTHERS: Interceptor is a bike where the center of mass is towards the lower side, which is good to have. The torquey nature of engine also helps off the road, where the engine is much more tractable. Dont need to frequently shift gears.

VERDICT: So with all these mods over last few years, can interceptor work as an offroader? The answer is a restricted yes. It can do trails, bad roads, no roads, gravel, etc fairly well in good control and comfort. But when it comes to gnarly technical trails, high angle ascents and descents with loose stones gravel, etc i would not dare attempt them, where as i could give it try on my xpulse. The mods have definitely solved my purpose, where i can stand and ride for long on bad broken roads, dont have to slow down on speed breakers, etc. Also not to mention the fact that i have been subjecting the bike to a fair bit of torture by going hard over undulations, jumping speed breakers, and bikes been mechanically holding well. Hope it continues that way. All in all, i am very happy with the bike now as it compliments my requirements well.
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Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-01-03.jpg  

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-01-06.jpg  

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Old 16th March 2023, 14:11   #3845
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Re: Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin

Updated Continental GT launched from 3.19 Lakhs onwards.

Alloy wheel equipped variant is priced at 3.39 lakhs, while the range topping Chrome tank equipped Mr. Clean which still comes with spoked wheels is priced at 3.45 lakhs.

Name:  20230316010321_RE00.jpg
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18 inch alloys, so can be retrofitted to our existing motorcycles. Finally

The switch gear and LED headlamp from the Super Meteor 650 makes its way to the CGT 650 too.

Link from Autocar: https://www.autocarindia.com/bike-ne...19-lakh-427576
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Old 16th March 2023, 15:22   #3846
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Re: Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin

From RE's website, the alloy wheels & blackened engine are available on 2 models of Interceptor & 2 models of GT650, namely Black Ray & Barcelona Blue Interceptor (331K) & Slipstream Blue & Apex Grey GT650 with a fascinating look (like the 120 anniversary edition)

Black Pearl & Sunset Strip carry the same old special paint scheme (321K)
Canyon Red & Cali Green (new color) are monotone colors (303K)
Mark II, as usual full Chrome tank (331K) are still available in spoked wheel for those retro lovers.

Similarly for GT: Slipstream Blue & Apex Grey (339K) with blackened engine & alloy wheels
Dux Dulux carry the same old special paint scheme (329K)
Rocker Red & British Racing Green (319K) are monotone colors with stripe
Mr. Clean in Chrome fuel tank (345K) are spoked wheel & non chrome/silver engine.

Technically, no change in the engine, although my heart throbs for the blackened engine. Hopefully some of the specification are incorrect, especially Width of 835mm {old: 1165mm}, Height of 1067mm {old: 789mm} & Kerb Weight of 218 Kg {old: 202 Kg}. Relief comes in form of the tire size & brakes that has not changed from the old & new models {100/90-18 & 130/70-18, 320mm & 240mm}

USB charger near clutch lever & Meteor like handlebar grips are bonus on all the newer models. Not sure if the price increase is justified (~22K for the similar variants of old & new models), but the value proposition seems good. If I were to buy an Interceptor or GT, eyes closed it will be: Black Ray or Apex Grey my first choice & can perhaps settle with Barcelona Blue or Slipstream Blue as second.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf royal-enfield-interceptor-technical-specifications.pdf (2.08 MB, 44 views)

Last edited by aargee : 16th March 2023 at 15:26.
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Old 18th March 2023, 21:30   #3847
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Re: Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin

Needed advice: I own 2022 interceptor 650 and have gone through the hassle of fixing the punctures twice already and don't want to go through that again. I'm planning convert my wheels to tubeless. Which is the better option out-ex, way2speed or just regular high quality silicone? If anyone using these places help me out. Or should I ditch these jugaad and go for the alloy which probably will be available from RE in a couple of months
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Old 18th March 2023, 23:42   #3848
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Re: Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin

Quote:
Originally Posted by The_Stig View Post
Needed advice: I own 2022 interceptor 650 and have gone through the hassle of fixing the punctures twice already and don't want to go through that again. I'm planning convert my wheels to tubeless. Which is the better option out-ex, way2speed or just regular high quality silicone? If anyone using these places help me out. Or should I ditch these jugaad and go for the alloy which probably will be available from RE in a couple of months
Way2Speed is better. But if youíre running on Ceat tyres, they arenít tubeless, regardless of rim sealing. So youíll have to change to Ralco or Pirelli or some other TL tyres.
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Old 19th March 2023, 06:45   #3849
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Re: Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin

Quote:
Originally Posted by GreyNomad View Post
Way2Speed is better. But if youíre running on Ceat tyres, they arenít tubeless, regardless of rim sealing. So youíll have to change to Ralco or Pirelli or some other TL tyres.
Thank you for your reply...may i ask how long you've been using way2speed? How's the reliability? And doesn't it just peel off from the rim, from all the heat and pressure that wheels sustain?
Yes, I've planned to get MRF nylogrip zapper-y which I found on Amazon which are the same size of the stock ones or the vredestein (that comes with the new Continental GT)
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Old 19th March 2023, 20:29   #3850
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Re: Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin

Quote:
Originally Posted by aargee View Post

Technically, no change in the engine, although my heart throbs for the blackened engine. Hopefully some of the specification are incorrect, especially Width of 835mm {old: 1165mm}, Height of 1067mm {old: 789mm} & Kerb Weight of 218 Kg {old: 202 Kg}. Relief comes in form of the tire size & brakes that has not changed from the old & new models {100/90-18 & 130/70-18, 320mm & 240mm}
Seems like there are a minor performance tweak as well, both the bikes now make peak power 500rpm lower on the rev range , as reported by a few media houses.
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Old 20th March 2023, 16:34   #3851
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Re: Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin

Quote:
Originally Posted by aargee View Post
From RE's website Hopefully some of the specification are incorrect, especially Width of 835mm {old: 1165mm}, Height of 1067mm {old: 789mm} & Kerb Weight of 218 Kg {old: 202 Kg}. Relief comes in form of the tire size & brakes that has not changed from the old & new models {100/90-18 & 130/70-18, 320mm & 240mm}
Previously RE had quoted 202Kg, which is the dry weight, a la Triumph, who still quote the dry weight. 218kg is more realistic, it appears to be the real 'Kerb Weight', which as per the widely accepted DIN norms means the weight of the vehicle, all fluids and 90% of the fuel.
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Old 23rd March 2023, 09:36   #3852
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Re: Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin

Quote:
Thank you for your reply...may i ask how long you've been using way2speed? How's the reliability? And doesn't it just peel off from the rim, from all the heat and pressure that wheels sustain?
Yes, I've planned to get MRF nylogrip zapper-y which I found on Amazon which are the same size of the stock ones or the vredestein (that comes with the new Continental GT)
I have been running on way2speed tubeless conversion kit as well. Its been close to 6 months without any issues or drop in pressure. I have timsuns Tubeless tyres on the bike which i belive are bias-ply with stronger side walls.

Prior to this, i had tried tubeless conversion with DOWSIL 732 sealant which was working fine for a friend. On my bike, i developed minor leak on the rear tyre, so gave up on that approach. That was however with stock pirelli phantom tyres.

I know a few more riders who are using way-2-speed conversion kit in Bangalore without any issues. I guess it also depends on who is doing the conversion, his skill set and attention to details.
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Old 25th March 2023, 04:52   #3853
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I've had this amazing machine for a little over 2 years now. The odometer crossed the 20,000km mark a couple of months ago.

In these two years, the bike has been a reliable runner. I have zero complaints. I've largely ignored the low battery warning I've had since last April. The bike starts without a hitch so I've left it at that. When the lamp comes on, I charge the battery. Battery voltage has not dropped below 12.3 volts (With the low battery warning lit) so I am guessing I can carry on running like this till the bike hesitates to start.

Rust is a minor issue. What I have realized is that if you let small water droplets stand on the chrome bits like the handlebar, bend pipe, etc, they will turn out as a rust spots. Wipe them down as soon as you can. I ignored this and my bend pipe has lost most of its new look shine. While its mostly surface rust, the bike will no longer have that shine like it used to. I say this as someone who does not do any TLC for the bike. The bike gets a hose down at home once every 6 months at best. A gap this long means my rims and spokes are covered in grime and who doesn't love the joy of cleaning spoked wheels. Reminds me of the days I used fine sand paper element for cleaning rusted spokes on my Street Cat.

I flagged the above as I've had a few rain soaked days of riding. You are in no mood to wipe down the bike once you reach your destination. You are tired, drained out and the first thing you want to do is get out of those rain soaked clothes and have a hot shower. More so after riding in ~15 degree conditions.

The last service was carried out at 19,7xxkm. Oil was switched from Motul 7100 to 3100 10W40. Oil filter was not changed. I've done >1000km with the new oil. Initial impressions are that the 7100 feels better. Will have to wait and see if there are long term benefits with the 3100. The strange thing is that I can't tell that an oil change has happened with this new grade. It feels more or less the same. The engine isn't more refined or coarse. The gearbox shift quality has not improved or worsened. When I used to do an oil change with the 3100, the change was noticeable. Even on the short ride home, you felt like the bike had new oil in it. I've been maintaining service intervals of 6000 - 7000km. In this time, the chain does not develop much slack and you can keep riding if you have to. No rattles or anything falling of the bike to date. This last service raised a few issues with braking. None that I had realized while riding. I did have quite a bit of travel or play for the rear brake lever. Thought it was wearing out of brake pads. When the service station checked for brake pressure, they found it weak for the rear brakes. On checking the brake fluid line, they found air in the system. Brake fluid was replaced and the entire system was bled. The same was done for the front brakes too. There was no air in this case. The brakes are back to how it felt when the bike was new. Braking is sharp with little play on the levers. I've not had to adjust the tappets to date. Aside from a little noise during cold starts (<15 degrees centigrade), all is well. This is a blessing of sorts as I dread anything that requires lifting of the valve cover.

I've had two small incidents on the road. First was an SUV rear ending. Fortunately the impact was at <5kmph so damage was limited. Ended up with a bent and cracked tail lamp assembly. Water isn't seeping in so I left it as is. The next was a bizarre one. I went for a ride with a mayte who rides a BMW F800GT. I am not sure if it was a case of distraction or not paying attention. I was stopped at a cross road and waiting for vehicles to pass. I was preparing to turn left. He comes up from behind and rear ends me at about 20 Kmph. He was approaching the same intersection and kept looking to the right for traffic while the bike was moving straight ahead. I guess his view of me in front of him went away or he thought I moved ahead. That BMW is a bigger and heavier bike. The impact was enough for me to loose balance. I fell with the bike. The tail end of the AEW exhaust made contact with the road, which lead to a small scratch and my clutch lever was beautifully bent in the shape of a U. I managed to sort out the clutch lever over a weekend DIY. In both these instances, it was the rider or driver not paying attention to the vehicle in front. Even though I was stationary in both cases, they thought I had moved. It was luck with the BMW as a quick glance in the rear view mirror suggested he was coming way too fast to stop. I braced myself for impact. The road had a steep camber on the left of the bike too so when I did drop my foot down to prevent a fall, there was no road for support. I must say that fitting the large engine guard was money well spent. It saved me and the bike from extensive damage.

I am not sure if the same applies in India. I had ordered for a new clutch lever thinking I won't be able to straighten out the damaged one. It was a wallet bleeding $90!. Thanks to importing these parts. When the clutch lever arrived, it was the entire assembly including wiring for the engine cut out circuit. I wonder if you can order the clutch lever alone as a child part in India, or, if this is how it is. Anyway, this new lever assembly now sits in a spare parts bag.

I've had the AEW TE102 exhaust on the bike for quite some time now. There is no looking back at the stock exhausts. An aftermarket exhaust, provided it is designed well and not too loud is the way to go. Not only does the bike sound & feel better with these exhausts, the slimmer profile does a good job for looks. I did try riding without the baffles and sure enough, it gets louder. Encourages you to ride the bike hard. There's lots of bass and its entertaining to ride in the City. Gets irritatingly loud on an open road though. The noise will tire you after a point. Top end response takes a hit too.

With the TE102, the one thing you do loose is a bit of low end grunt. Its not immediately apparent and when you can ride only your bike, you don't notice what you've lost or gained. This was quite apparent when I took FM tharians bike for a short spin. He runs with a AEW TE201 with a Silent DB killer and at the time was using a Way 2 Speed air filter element with the stock air filter cover in place. Its either the design of the exhaust that offers more back pressure or a combination of the TE201 and Way 2 speed air filter that is a good match. The bottom end response is better than my bike. I installed the same air filter with an open bracket, in hope of regaining some of that lost bottom end and improving top end response without the Regular DB Killer. For now, that difference is purely theoretical or on paper. If anything, a little induction noise is heard when you go hard on the gas. For those of you considering an AEW exhaust, I'd go with the TE201. Whatever this exhaust is doing internally is something I can't explain. Its a better match and has a louder note too (This was a surprise). Even with the DB killers inserted. To be clear, I was not on a quest for gaining power. This bike has plenty enough that unless you are racing the thing around a track, I doubt you need more for everyday use and the occasional road trip.

A point to raise about the screws for the air filter housing. They are soft. Never, ever over tighten them. I don't know how this happened (must have been from last service), I could not get one of the screws out when I wanted to replaced the stock air filter with the Way 2 Speed one. It was over tightened. Fiddling with the one jammed screw ended up in a completely warped screw head. There was no way to grip it anymore. I got the screw removed and replaced with a new one (of better quality) at last service. They used a gentle action of a hammer drill working in reverse and took the screw out. No damage to the inner threads or any of the plastics.

Economy has been more or less steady. I get about 240km till the reserve light blinks. I am sure one can extract more miles if you ride conservatively. When I switch to B roads, I pay less attention to the throttle and hit 5000 rpm with an aggressive approach. When you do this, economy goes down hill, fast.

The lights are okay. I rarely ride post sun down and don't really miss a brighter headlamp. Fortunately other road users dip their lights if they see oncoming traffic.

Most find the front suspension too soft. In this part of the world, I find that softness a blessing. The roads are far from smooth and anything that can reduce transmitting that towards the handlebar is a win. I need to have a play with the rear suspension. At times, you feel like you are being thrown around at its stock setting.

I've got Bridgestone Battlax tires on both ends of the bike and I maintain them at 30/34psi. Dry level grip is good. Is a better wearing tire than the stock Pirelli's. Haven't gone wild with cornering in the wet. I will admit that I am close to wetting my pants these days every time I see a film of water running across the road (Will cover more about this further below). New Zealand chipseal roads are punishing due to the rough road surface so you need a tire that offers good grip and decent life. Ultra slick or grippy tires will be wallet bleed.

In terms of touring accessories and what goes along with the bike during trips, I have a Trip Machine duffel bag. Its my Armageddon bag. I've got clothes, jocks, extra socks, a towel all packed in. This bag is never emptied out. The other main reason to strap the bag is to carry a water bottle and a spare tire tube. The bag is strapped to the bike 90% of the time. The best way to use this bag is to load it up as much as you can. It isn't very secure when its part loaded and can shift around the seat. There are 2 hook straps that ensure the bag does not sway too much from side by side and another 4 straps to secure the bag further. The bag isn't water proof. Trip machine do provide a rain cover that goes around the bag and is secured via a plastic hook. The rain cover can protect to about 70%. Water does tend to seep in under a torrential downpour, especially when the bike is parked in the open.

Comfort on this motorcycle is subjective or should I say a debatable matter. One thing is clear, the touring seat is better. You sit higher and there is some extra cushioning underneath. The stock seat feel comfortable initially and after about an hour, you feel like you are sitting on a slab of stone. Combine this with a committed riding position, battling winds from all directions and you're not all that comfortable anymore. In facts, its a struggle to be seated on this bike and ride at anything over 100Kmph. Fatigue sets in early, for me. Marathon or non-stop runs are best avoided.

The section below is less about the bike and more about the riding experience in a different country.

Riding on New Zealand roads has been quite an experience over the last 2 years. Its mostly positive. To start, traffic is a sparse once you head out the city. Once you head onto B roads or off the main State highways, you are on your own mostly. I try and stay away from motorways or expressways as much as possible. B roads are better and you're not around open spaces of land. I bring this up as the Interceptor does not not like any wind. You've got head on wind the deal with, however, side winds make it a bit hairy. You feel pushed around, depending on the direction of the wind blowing. You'd think that a bike this heavy will be rock steady on the road.

More than checking for rain or sunshine, the focus on my weather App is to check wind speed around the region and towards my destination. You don't want to be riding any bike if cross winds are over 30 Kmph. Not that you can't ride. Its a strain and you need absolute focus which ends up making you feel more tired by the end of your road trip. Aside from wind, I've also come to learn and discover first hand, what various tar compounds can do to the surface of a road. The chip seal process used for roads in New Zealand contains petroleum products for their sealing (I guess this is standard fare globally). I have not read enough to know the ratio of this compound that goes in with Bitumen. When it gets really hot (>25 degrees centigrade), this petroleum mix starts to rise from the melting tar above. That makes the road extremely slippery. I was advised on a Motorcycle Training Program on spotting these patches and to avoid them as much as possible, especially on roads that have a lot of patchwork done to them. B (A lot of A roads too) roads are full of patch jobs. The Trainer showed us footage from a motorcycle dash cam of a rider sliding and falling off the bike while taking a wide turn on a bone dry road. To my eyes, the road looked perfectly okay. Things get worse when the weather suddenly switches from hot & muggy to rain in an instant. We see this a lot these days. That oily substance mixed in the tar, which has risen due to heat is now mixed with water. We all know how that plays out. I experienced this sort of thing on a trip to Hastings last year (Same part of New Zealand thats now submerged and destroyed after Cyclone Gabrielle). The conditions were wet and I was going arrow straight at about 90Kmph. At a point, the bikes rear end fish tailed. It lasted for a second at the most and was scary enough that I reduced speed immediately. I lost all confidence for that day and till the weather improved. That experience spooks me out even now as I've never experienced a motorcycle fish tailing while going arrow straight down a road. Its that Chipseal compound used that makes the road dangerous for a motorcycle rider. To make matters worse, many New Zealand State Highways used steel wire for fencing or dividing two lanes of the road. If you slide into one of these at motorway speed, you're looking at serious injury. On wet roads, its best to ride with plenty of room for error.

The above isn't to say New Zealand roads are bad. The Government has not prioritized the upkeep of B roads in the same way they do for A Roads or Major State Highways. Design and Execution of motorways are really good. I've yet to come across a situation of water standing on a motorway. Expansion joints are barely felt when you go over a bridge.

It is mandatory to own two sets of riding gear in this part of the world. For Winter and Summer. I've kept it quite simple. I've got hiking pants which work well during the colder months like Winter and Spring. These pants block out wind entry like no other pant I have used before. Spring can get cold and a lot depends on your ability to absorb or bear that cold. My body can't deal with any cold so I am suited and booted to an almost winter level during Spring season. I have a short sleeve part leather, part fabric Glove and a long Sleeve full fabric winter one. Both made by Ixon. The winter one isn't as good as advertised. All the temperature ratings claimed don't hold up. My fingers end up frozen on a winter day. An Ixon wind deflector jacket which is worn under my Dri Rider jacket. I recently got a used Levi's Leather jacket which has a furry inner section. This is my current Summer Jacket and I love it to bits. Leather keeps wind out far more effectively than my Dri Rider. I also love the flexibility to move versus all the inner armor plating on the Dri Rider that restricts movement. I had a simple Rexine fabric shoe that I wore till the sole on one of them got a hole in it. Replaced it with a similar ankle height shoe. The only bit of riding gear that I am no longer enjoying is my Bell lid. It is starting to feel too snug and I am finding it rather heavy. I want to get something lighter and in line with the styling of my bike. One of those classic look ones with a large visor area like this Bell Bullitt. There are a few manufacturers making these. Need to find one that prioritizes comfort and wind deflection. I wear two balaclavas below my lid for a second level of wind protection.

With just about any ride, there is some preparation you do. You look at destination options, the route you take, should you carry luggage or not, look out for weather (which is getting harder to predict nowadays). As days get closer, preparation switches to the excitement of the ride. This happiness or excitement happens only when you have the right motorcycle. That is what the Interceptor is, to me. I love this machine. Every weekend, I am looking for an opportunity to hit the road. Granted it isn't the ultimate touring motorcycle. Its a sort of big brat bike which can do some touring due to the size and nature of the engine. Yeah, I do need a stretch every 80 to 100km and thats okay. Comfort is not the Interceptors selling point. Its about how you feel when you ride this bike. Its raw. You feel the engine buzz, you hear the intake, there is immense satisfaction when riding on a twisty road. Few bikes have this.

Signing off from Aokautere
Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-img_20230226_135325.jpg
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Old 25th March 2023, 18:31   #3854
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Re: Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin

Quote:
Originally Posted by sandeepmohan View Post
Oil was switched from Motul 7100 to 3100 10W40
Hello sir, feeling a little curious to understand the rationale of downgrading from 7100 to 3100, which may not necessarily match my rule book knowledge with the benefits of your experience; hence seeking to enlighten if there is any specific reason please?

Additionally, I'm assuming its a typo on the engine oil grade 10W50 was mistyped as 10W40.

Ridden: Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 & Continental GT 650 Twin-a1.jpg

Last edited by Chetan_Rao : 25th March 2023 at 21:18. Reason: As requested.
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